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Full text of "Breeder and Sportsman (1916)"

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THb BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 1, 1916 



.00 

TEED 



S THE STATE FAIR FUTURITY STAKE NU. 8 m 

' (Foals of mares covered in 1915) 

TO TROT AND PACE AT THREE YEARS OLD 

$2200 for Trotting DivisiOQ $1800 for Pacing DivisioQ 

To be Given Under tlie Direction of tiie 

California State Agricultural Society, 1919 

Entries to Close January 1, 1916 



Money Divided as Follows: 



TROTTING DIVISION 
$75 to Nominator of Dam of Winner in Summary of Race 
$2125 Three- Year-Old Trotters 



PACING DIVISION 
$75 to Nominator of Dam of Winner in Summary of Race 
$1725 Three-Year-Old Pacers 



ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS — $2 to nominate mare on January 1, 1916. when name, color, breeding of mare and stallion bred to must be given; $5 July 1, 1916; $5 Decem- 
ber 1. 1916; $10 on yearlings February 1. 191"; $10 on two-year-olds February 1, 1918; $10 on tliroe-year-olds February 1, 1919. 

STARTING PAYMENTS — $50 to start in pacing division; $75 to start in trotting division. All starting payments to be made ten days before the first day of the State Fair 
at which the race is to take pince. 

Nominators must designate when making payments lo start whether the horse entered is a Trotter or Pacer. 



.xvwxxwvv^ CONDITIONS ^MTM, 



The race in each division will be for three heats; if no horse wins two of the throe heats a fourth heat must be raced by the heat witmers to decide the winner of the race; 
all other horses to go to the barn. 

Trotting Division heat purses $650. Total purse $2,125. 
Pacing Division heat purses $550. Total purse $1,725. 

Heat purses divided ."jO. 25. 15 and 10 per cent; the extra $175 in the trotting division and the extra $75 in the pacing division goes to the winner of two heats. 
' Distance 100 yards. A distanced horse shall be entitled to money already won. 

If a mare proves barren or slips or has a dead foal or twins, or if either the mare or the foal dies before December 1, 1916, her Nominator may sell or transfer his nomina- 
lion or substitute another mare or foal, regardless of ownership; but there will be no return of a payment nor will any entry be liable for more than the amount paid in. In 
nominating, the name, color and pedigree of mare must be given; also the name of the horse to which she was bred in 1915. 
Entry must bo accompanied by the entrance foe. 

Nominators are liable for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $4,000, the amount of this guar- 
antee only. 

Hobbles will bo barred in trotting and pacing divisions. 

Right reserved .to declare off or reopen these Stakes in case the number of entries received is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors. 
There will be no more money.3 in each division or heat than there are starters. No Iiorse shall receive more than one money in each heat. 
Entries open to the world. 

Other than exceptions made in this entry blank, rules of National Trotting Association to govern. 
J. M. PERRY, President. CHAS W. PAINE, Secretary, Sacramento, California. 



$3,000 



GUARANTEED 



ONLY $2.°° TO NOMINATE MARE 



fiUARANTEEO 




Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 16 



$3,000 



TO BE GIVEN BY THE 



Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association 

For Foals of Mares Covered in 1915 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years 0\ff 

Entries Close February 1, J9J6 



$1600 for Trotting Foals. 
$150 to Nominators of Dams of Winners 



$1100 for Pacing Foals 
$100 to Owners of Stallions 

























■ ■ ifmrnii 



$1000 for Three-Year-Old Trotters. 

50 to the Nominator of Ihe Dam on whose Original Entry is named the Winner of 

Three-Year-Old Trot. 
600 for Two-Year-Old Trotters. 
25 to the Nominator of the Dam on whose Original Entry is named the Winner of 

Two-Year-Old Trot. 

50 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when Mare 
was bred. 

Given to Owners of Stallions standing highest 



$700 for Three-Year-Old Pacers. 

50 to the Nominator of '.he Dam on whose Original Entry is named the Winner of 
Three-Year-Old Pace. 
400 for Two-Year-Old Pacers. 
25 to the Nominator of the Dam on whose Original Entry is named the Winner of 
Two-Year-Old Pace. 

50 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace when Mare 
was bred. 

SPECIAL CASH PRIZES FOR STALLION OWNERS. 

1 number of Mares nominated in this Stake that were bred to their respective horses, divided as follows: 
FIRST PRIZE, $35; SECOND PRIZE, $15. 

Th* Above Prizes will be Paid on February 20ih, 1916 

ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS — $2 to nominate mare on February 1. 1916; when name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given; $5 August 1, 1916; 
$10 on Yearlings January 1. 1917; $10 on Two-Year-Olds January 1, 1918; $10 on Three-Year-Olds January 1, 1919. 

STARTING PAYMENTS. — $25 to start in the Two-Year-Old Pace; $35 to start in the Two-Year-Old Trot; $35 to start in the Thrce-Year-OId Pace; $50 to start in the 
Three-Year-Old Trot. All .Starting Payments to be made ten days before the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 

Nominators must designate when making payments to start whether the horse entered is a Trotter or Pacer. 

Colts that start at Two Years Old are not barred from starting again in the Three-Year-Old Divisions. 

CONDITIONS: 

The races for Two-Year-Olds will be mile heats. 2 in 3. not to exceed three heats, and if not decided in two heats, will be finished at the end of the third heat and money 
divided according \o rank in the summary; and for Three-Year-Olds — three hea's, money divided 25 per cent to the first heat, 25 per cent to the second heat, 25 per cent to the 
third heat, and 25 per cent to ^he race according to rank in the summary. Money in each division 50, 25. 15 and 10 per cent. Should two or more horses be tied for first 
ol.ice at the completion of the third heat, such horses only shall contest in a fourth heat ?nd money divided according ',o rank in the summary at the termination of that heat. 
A horse having won the first two heats and drawn or distanced in the third heat shall net lose position in the summary. Distance for Two-Year-Olds, 150 yards; for Three- 
Year-Olds. 100 yards. 

If a mare proves barren or slips or has a dead foal or twins; or if either the mare or foal dies before January 1. 1917, her nominator may sell or transfer his nomination or 
substitute another mare or foal, regardless of ownership; but there will be no return of apaymeni, nor will any entry be liable for more than amount paid in or contracted for. 
In entries, the name, color and pedigree of mare must be given; also the name of the horse to which she was bred in 1915. 

Entries must be accompanied by entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $3000, the amount of the guar- 
antee, only. 

Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacing divisions. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these Stakes in case the number of entries received is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors. 
Money divided in each division of the Stake 50. 25. 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division or heat th.an there are starters. 
Entries open to the world. Membership not required to enter; but no horses, ^herever owned, will be allowed to start until the owner has become a member. 



E. 



P. HEALD, 

President. 



. . , ,^VJ•jte. few Jintrjs Biaii^ to 



F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 
P. O. Drawer 447. 366 Pacific Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



Saturday, January 1, 1916] 



i-HE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



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BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

Turf and Sporting Authority on the Pacific Coast. 

(Established 1882.) 
Published every Saturday. 
F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 



OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACFIC BUILDING 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
National Newspaper Bureau, Agent, 219 East 23rd St., 

New York City. 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco P. O. 



Terms — One year, $3; six months, $1.75; three months, $1. 

Foreign postage $1 per year additional; Canadian postage 
50c per year additional. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or regis- 
tered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 
447, San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



LAST CALL FOR STATE FAIR FUTURITY. 



Today is the date of closing for entries to the 
State Fair Futurity No. Eight for foals of mares bred 
in 1915 to trot and pace as three-year-olds in 1919. 
Under the rules of the National Trotting Association, 
however, as tomorrow is Sunday and hence a holi- 
day, entries bearing postmark prior to noon next 
Monday, January third, will be legal, so that ifyou 
have not already made your entries for this event 
you have ample time to fill out the blanks tomorrow 
and get them mailed in proper shape to comply with 
the letter of the law governing the stake. We do 
not know of any better way for a horseman to start 
the new year than by making a futurity nomination — 
or a number of them — so do the thing up right while 
you are about it and name every mare that you own 
that shows the slightest sign of being with foal. 

The conditions of this stake were reviewed at 
length in a recent issue of this paper and will be 
found extended on a business page of this issue, but 
just as a memory jogger and to acquaint you with 
its more salient features we call your attention to 
the following points: 

The stake is made for a guaranteed sum of four 
thousand dollars and is strictly a three-year-old 
event, the two-year-old division having been discon- 
tinued for the last number or so of this series, the 
plan seeming to have met with the approval of breed- 
ers pretty generally. Two thousand two hundred 
dollars will be devoted to the trotters, of which 
seventy-five thousand dollars will be paid to the nom- 
inator of the winner according to the standing in the 
summary, with a purse of six hundred and fifty dol- 
lars divided into the customary four moneys on each 
heat, the winner in the summary being awarded the 
additional one hundred and seventy-five dollars. In 
the pacing division, which is for a total sum of 
eighteen hundred dollars, seventy-five will be award- 
ed the nominator of the dam of the winner, while 
the heat purses will be five hundred and fifty dollars 
each, leaving an extra seventy-five for the winner. 
This division of the purse contributes to racing to 
win, which means more interest for the spectators, 
while prohibiting any long drawn contests which 
would be injurious to colts of that tender age. Unless 
three heat winners develop in the first three times 
out, the race will end at that point, and cannot pos- 
sibly go more than four heats to a decision, as heat- 
winners only will be the order after the third round. 
The winner of the race draws a slightly larger por- 
tion of the purse than is customary under the old 
system, but this is a step in the right direction, as 
he is the one and only horse to be penalized with a 
record and should profit from the race to an accord- 
ingly greater proportion. Racing to win, which means 
a great advance in the drawing power of harness 
racing from the standpoint of the public, should be 
encouraged by making winning more nearly worth 
while, as no matter how great the contest, it is the 
winner that has really held the crowd. It is an old 
saying that "nobody remembers the name of the sec- 
ond horse in the Derby," and there is a lot of truth 
in it, too. Try it on yourself, for instance. You can 
name a number of horses that have won the M. and 
M. and other great stakes, but we will lay you a 
small bet on our own accord that you cannot recall 
the names of the horses that finished second in those 
same events. 

The initial cost of making nomination to the stake 
is very moderate and the conditions throughout have 
been drawn with the express purpose of making the 
event most attractive to breeders. The customary 



substitution clause prevails, and if you have not 
already made your entries we suggest that you turn 
to the published conditions and sit down and attend 
to the same at once. Failure to provide your foals 
with futurity nominations may prove a matter of con- 
siderable regi'et to you in future years, especially 
when its opportunities may be safeguarded at a cost 
so trifling as is the case in the present instance. 

o 

TO PROTECT OWNERS OF PUREBRED LIVE- 
STOCK. 



At the recent annual meeting of the National 
Society of Record Associations which was held on 
November 27 at the Hotel LaSalle, Chica.go, one of 
the most important topics up for consideration was 
the outbreak of foot and mouth disease, from which, 
by the grace of vigilance and the utmost of good 
fortune the breeders of the Pacific Coast section 
have escaped scot free. The outbreak was discussed 
in all its phases, and after sending a memorial to 
Governor Dunne of Illinois urging prompt legislation 
to provide for the overdue obligations of that com- 
monwealth to its citizens who have had their herds 
destroyed, the members in attendance turned their 
attention to a consideration of the plight in which 
breeders of purebred herds find themselves, the 
present systems of reimbursement for slaughtered 
cattle taking no further account of the situation than 
that a cow is a cow, working a manifest injustice 
upon the man who sees his almost priceless animals 
"scragged" on a scrub basis. The methods of insti- 
tuting and maintaining quarantine and making resti- 
tution for cattle killed lead to the adoption of the 
following resolutions, which were at once transmitted 
to every member of the House and Senate at the 
nation's capital: 

Whereas, county quarantines have been imposed 
by Federal authorities, and followed by State officials 
in fighting foot and mouth disease; and 

Whereas, such quarantines are palpably inadequate 
where the disease is located within a short distance 
of the county line and oppressively unjust in such 
instances to farmers located on the other side of the 
county, twenty or thirty miles away; 

Therefore Resolved, that the National Society of 
Record Associations vigorously opposes such quaran- 
tines and demands a radius quarantine that shall be 
absolute and of unquestioned efficiency of such dis- 
tances as the authorities deem necessary, which alone 
is protective in the highest degree and at the same 
time just, and that we also favor the marketing for 
immediate slaughter of sound and healthy stock 
where conditions warrant from within the radius, 
subject to proper inspection. 

Whei-eas, neither the Nation nor the State can 
legally take for public good the property of a loyal 
citizen without adequate compensation, either in the 
exercise of its powers of eminent domain or its police 
powers; and 

Whereas, the Federal Department of Agriculture 
believes it has no authority in the statute to pay for 
pure bred stock slaughtered in disease eradication 
higher prices than it pays for ordinary market stock 
kept for meat or milk purposes; and 

Whereas, some states have set an arbitrary maxi- 
mum limit to the value that appraisers in such cases 
may fix for pure bred stock; 

Therefore Resolved, that the National Society of 
Record Associations demands Federal and State leg- 
islation which will allow appraisers to value pure 
bred stock at its reasonable breeding value, without 
arbitrai-y limitation, when slaughtered on account of 
foot and mouth disease. We commend as a model for 
such legislation the New York statute which provides 
that in the event that either party to the appraise- 
ment is dissatisfied appeal may be taken to the 
proper court, without delaying slaughter, where the 
value of the property of a citizen taken for public 
use is finally fixed in accordance with the rule of law 
and court practice. 

Resolved, that the National Society of Record 
Associations appeals to Congress to amend the stat- 
ute which requires that the Chief of the Bureau of 
Animal Industry shall be a veterinary surgeon by 
eliminating that provision, in order that a man of 
business training, familiar with the production and 
marketing of live stock, may be eligible to such 
position. 

Resolved, that it is the sense of the National Soci- 
ety of Record Associations that the question of 
whether pure bred herds exposed to foot and mouth 
disease shall be slaughtered in all instances or not. 
should be determined on the merits of each indi- 
vidual case. 

In the matter of the election of officers for the 
ensuing year, M. D. Munn, president of the American 
Jersey Cattle Ciub, was nominated for president; 
W. Reid Carpenter, president of the American Short- 
horn Breeders' Association, was nominated vice- 
president, and Wayne Dinsmore, secretary of the 
Percheron Society of America, who has served the 
record association as secretary since its inception, 
was nominated to succeed himself in that office, all 
three gentlemen being declared elected unanimously. 



MONGREL STALLIONS DECREASING IN 
NUMBERS. 



One of the most pleasing features to be noted in 
the fourth annual report of the California Stallion 
Registration Board, which has just lately come to 
hand from the office of Secretary Charles W. Paine, 
is that portion which shows the steady decrease of 
the number of mongrel stallions licensed since the 
law became operative in 1912. In that season there 
were 766 of these undesirable citizens listed with the 
registration board; in 1913 the number had fallen 
to 707, and in the following year only 547 were 
licensed under this uncomplimentary description. 
By this time breeders had begun to fight shy of this 
kind of animal in earnest, with the result that the 
returns for 1915 showed the greatest falling off of 
any season, the number of animals described as 
mongrels having dropped to 350 — scarcely one-half 
as many as infested the farms of the state at the time 
the law was put into effect. The value of the law in 
this respect alone is incalculable, and in the course 
of a very few years the average value of the horses 
in California will show an increase directly traceable 
to the beneficent workings of the stallion registra- 
tion law. 

Of stallions of all classes, licenses for the season 
of 1915 were taken out for 1,336, while the permits 
for jacks swelled the number of licensed sires to a 
total of 1,631, a decrease of 32 from the totals of the 
preceding year. The most popular horse in the state, 
as measured by the number of stallions of the various 
families for which licenses were issued, is the Per- 
cheron, with 437 representatives. Next in order come 
the Standard-bred Trotter with 186, the Belgian with 
143, the Shire with 72, the French Draft with 46, the 
German Coach with 32, the Clydesdale with 22, the 
Thoroughbred with 13, the Saddler and the French 
Coach with 10 each and the Arab, the Hackney, the 
Non-standard, the Norman and the Suffolk with from 
one to four each. Of the 295 jacks, 114 are purebred, 
6 are grades and the remaining 175 are mongrels, so 
that there is still room for a great deal of improve- 
ment in their ranks. The stallions of the various 
families are well distributed throughout the state, 
with the counties of San Joaquin, Fresno and Ala- 
meda being the leading centers of breeding opera- 
tions. 

The report is the most comprehensive and elab- 
orate of any yet made by the registration board, 
showing that Secretary Paine and his associates are 
fully alive to the importance of the work in hand. 
The stallion registration law, as revised and amended 
by the last session of the legislature, appears in 
full and in addition to the statistical tables there is 
much interesting and important supplementary mat- 
ter. The states in which stallion registration laws 
are operative are shown, as well as a summary of 
the various foreign breeds which are recognized by 
our government as established families of pure 
lineage, with illustrations of the certificates issued 
by the parent it cord associations which are recog- 
nized by the local board. Not the least important, 
by any means, is that portion of the publication 
devoted to a verbal and pictorial description of a 
number of the \ariouK diseases enumerated in the 
law as contributory to unsoundness. 

o 

SECOND ANNUAL DRAFTER SALE. 



Secretary E. W. Westgate of the California Draft 
Horse Breeders' Association has announced that the 
second annual sale of pure bred draft horses will be 
held by that body on Wednesday, February second, 
at the University Farm at Davis, thus offering to 
local breeders most exceptional opportunities of 
exchanging stallions which would have a new and 
enhanced value in a change of location, and of re- 
cruiting the best obtainable young mares and fillies 
for their bi'ood mare bands. Last year the first of 
these sales was held at Davis under the auspices of 
the association, and proved a success in every way. 
As the sale becomes more widely known as a fixture 
of the season and as a consequence attracts patron- 
age from a much wider range of territory, its value 
to the draft horse breeding interests of California 
will become just so much the greater. Detailed 
information concerning the proposed sale will be 
forthcoming at an early date, and in the meantime 
any breeders who will probably have consignments 
to make to the same are advised to begin getting 
the horses in shape and also to get into touch with 
Secretary Westgate, whose home address is Rio 
Vista. "Condition" plays a large part in the prices 
paid for both marcs and stallions. 



18497(. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 1, 1916 



Actions of the Parent Associations 



During the earlier portion of the month of Decem- 
ber the tribunah; of botli of the parent associations 
under whose jurisdiction the sport of trotting is con- 
ducted were in session as usual, straightening out 
the tangles that arise invariably during the course 
of a year's racing. No great amount of action of 
especial interest to western horsemen was taken 
by either body, the following excerpts from the de- 
tailed official reports about covering the ground as 
far as our readers are concerned : 



The Board of Appeals of the American Trotting 
Association met at 10 o'clock a. m., Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 7, at the Auditorium Hotel, pursuant to call, 
the following members being present: W. P. Ijams, 
Terre Haute, Indiana, President: Thos. H. Gill, Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin; J. C. Linneman, Lima. Ohio: 
\V. H. Sniollin!.'.er, Iron Mountain, Missouri: L. N. 
Brueggerhoff. Shreveport, Louisiana: Geo. R. King, 
Dallas, Texas, members of the Board, and \V. H. 
Knight, Chicago, Illinois, Secretary. 

No. 5671, Protested Money. 

G. H. White, Malvern, Iowa, versus C. N. Clark. 
Winfield, Kansas. Bob Sebastian, Hemef, California, 
and b. h. "Hal McKinney." 

Protested first money, 2:08 pace, Beatrice, Ne- 
braska, June 24. 191.^. 

On June 21. 191."), the b. h. "Hal McKinney," by 
"Hal B.," started and won first money in the 2:08 
I)ace, at Beatrice, Nebraska. 

Protest was made against the eligibility of said 
horse to win in a 2:08 pacing race on account of a 
winning performance at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 
on or about September 30, 1914, the time of said per- 
formance bein-r recorded as 2:06%. 

The mont-y was withheld by the member pending 
investigation, but later on, on or about July 7, 1915, 
at West Point, Nebraska, the money was paid over 
to the owner or agent of the horse "Hal McKinyey" 
on the authority of a telegram from I. S. Mahan, Sec- 
retary of the member at Oklahoma City, stating: 

"Record by 'Hal McKinney' on our track last year 
exhibition only, message sent G. H. White, Kearney, 
Nebraska, error. Letter follows." 

The prolestant, however, still insisted that a money 
consideration was attached to the performances and 
filed program I'nd advertisements apparently show- 
ing this to be the case. 

Further inquiries were made from the Secretary 
of the member at Oklahoma City and after looking 
into the case further. Secretary I. S. Mahan wrote 
under date of August 2?. that he had taken up the 
matter with the Superintendent of Speed for 1914, 
who writes as follows: 

"Referring to the exhibition of the horse 'Hal Mc- 
Kinney' last year, beg to say we offered this horse 
a certain purse to give us an exhibition, and a certain 
amount added i!' he would reduce the track record. 
In addition to this we paid some runner to accom- 
pany him in the exhibition. I believe this is the sum 
and substance o* the contract. 

"FINAL SUMMARY. 
"Double Team Race — Pacing: 

"Hal McKinnev and Wni. Knight.... 2 13 
Paid $100. 
"Free-for-A'l Pace — One heat: 
"Hal McKinney, first. Paid $55." 
With this evidence on file and as there is no dis- 
pute as to the time of the heat won by "Hal McKin- 
ney" in the fri>e-for-all pace, for a consideration of 
$5.">. namely. 2:0(;-''ii, it is evident that under the rules 
of The American Trotting Association the b. h. "Hal 
McKinney" obtained a winning record of 2:06% at 
Oklahoma City, on September 30. 1914. and hence was 
ineligible to compete in the 2:08 pacing class at 
Beatrice. Nebraska, on June 24, 1915. 

Ordered, that, the protest be sustained and Bob 
Sebastian of Hemet, California, and C. N. Clark of 
Winfield, Kansas, be ordered to return said winnings 
of the b. h. "Hal McKinney" for redistribution. 
No. 5704, Demand for Identification and Protested 

Money. 

W. C. Brown, Vancouver, British Columbia, versus 
A. E. Smith, Vancouver, British Columbia, and b. g. 
"John D. " 

Demand for identification and protested first 
money. 2:30 pace, Ladner, British Columbia, June 
26, 1915. 

During the meeting of the member at Ladner, 
British Columbia, June, 1915, a demand was made 
for the identification and eligibility of the b. g. "John 
D." to compete, said horse being entered in the 2:30 
pacing race on June 26. The horse started under 
protest and won first money, which was retained by 
the member and subsequently deposited in the Trust 
Fund of The American Trotting Association. 

The horse was owned and nominated by A. E. 
Smith of Vancouver, British, Columbia. The de- 
mand for identification was made by W. C. Brown 
of Vancouver, British Columbia, Vice-President of 
The American Trotting Association for British Co- 
lumbia. 

In response to the demand for identification, A. E. 
Smith states that he is unabje to furnish any infor- 
mation as to his pedigree, record or previous history. 
That he is a dealer in horses and purchased said 



liorse lioin .Si;uili \ ui .Su \ i ^-i mi, British Co- 

lumbia, who owned llie horse for two years, but did 
not discover thai he had any speed. That Smith has 
owned the horso for one year and nine months and 
has known the forse tor four years and a half. That 
he has tried to find out all about him, but has not 
succeeded. 

It is clearly shown that the horse "John D." is not 
and cannot be sufficiently identified to comply with 
the rules of The American Trotting Association. 

Ordered, that the winnings of the b. g. "John D." in 
the 2:30 pace ai Ladner, British Columbia, June 26, 
1915, be redistributed under the rules and that said 
horse be declared ineligible to compete In any race 
over tracks of members of The American Trottin,i< 
Association until he is satisfactorily identified. 

No. 5817, Application for an Order. 

W. W. Fleming, Jr., Winnipeg, Manitoba, versus 
Dominion Exposition, Victoria, British Columbia. 
Application lor an order. 

On March 16, 1914, the British Columbia Agricul- 
tural Association ot Victoria, British Columbia, made 
application for membership in The American Trot- 
ting Association for their meeting, advertised to take 
place September 21-26, 1914, under the title of The 
Dominion Exposition. 

The application was accepted and the association 
duly placed on the roll of members. 

Subsequently, on August 25, 1915, the said meeting 
was declared oiT, the official statement of the Secre- 
tary being, "The Fair and races have been canceled 
on account of the war." 

This case is an application by W. W. Fleming, Jr., 
of Winnipeg, Manitoba, for return of moneys paid by 
him as entrance tees in the races advertised by said 
member, which were subsequently declared oft': to 
the amount of $110, said entrance fees being paid as 
entries on 

"Prince wood," in 209 pace, 2 per cent. .. $30.00 

"Creosote," in 2:24 trot, 2 per cent 20.00 

"Tropic Dawn," in 2:18 trot, 2 per cent.. 40.00 

"Creosote," in 2:18 trot, 1 per cent 20.00 

And is accompanied by affidavit that the amounts 
so paid have never been returned. Also by the re- 
ceipt issued by the member at Victoria, B. C, on 
May 15, 1914; also by the official list of Early Clos- 
ing Events issued by the member prior to date of 
declaring off. 

The member at Victoria, British Columbia, was 
notified, and re.^ponded ■ througli its Secretary, by 
stating that Mr. Fleming withdrew all his entries 
before the second payment was due. That they were 
also notified by the Circuit Secretary that his entries 
had been drawn from all points in the Circuit. That 
as the meeting in Victoria was not declared off until 
some time after the second payments were due, they 
considered that he had no claim for a refund, as he 
could not have paid any more whether the meeting 
would have been held or not. 

The Board held that, under the rules of The Amer- 
ican Trotting Association a member declaring off its 
meeting was not entitled to retain any moneys paid 
in to him for entrance fees or forfeits, and 

Ordered, that the Dominion Exposition of Victoria, 
British Columbia, be ordered to return to W. W. 
Fleming, Jr., the amount paid- in by him as entrance 
or forfeits, amounting to $110. 

No. 0826, Protested Collection. 

Protested' collection. 

J. G. Belt. Phoenix, Ariz., versus John B. Ryland, 
Tucson, Arizona, and s. g. "Naboth, Jr." 

Protested winnings, 2:25 trot and 2:18 trot. Phoe- 
nix, Arizona, November 15, 1915, and demand for 
eligibility. Continued to the next meeting of the 
Board, May, 1916. 



According to the By-Laws, a regular meeting of 
the Board of Review of the National Trotting Asso- 
ciation was held at the Murray Hill Hotel, New 
York, N. Y., commencing Tuesday, December 7. The 
Board convened at 10 a. m. The following officers 
and members were present: President, P. P. John- 
ston, Lexington, Kentucky; Third Vice-President, 
John C. Welty, Canton, Ohio; Chairman of Eastern 
District, F. O. Eeal, Bangor, Maine; Chairman of At- 
lantic District, Horatio N. Bain, Poughkeepsie, New 
York; Chairman of Central District, Carlos M. de 
GaiTnendia, Tuscarora, Md.; Chairman of Western 
District, A. P. Sandles, Ottawa, Ohio, and the Sec- 
retary. 

When the Board was called to order by the Presi- 
dent, the Secretary announced that there were vacan- 
cies on the District Boards in the Southern and 
Pacific Districts. On motion of Mr. Beal, seconded 
by Mr. Bain, J. O. Winston of Richmond, Virginia, 
was nominated and duly elected a member of the 
Southern District Board. Also after said election, 
he was by the President named as Chairman of the 
Southern District and when he arrived at 10:45 a. m. 
he took his place as a member of the Board of Review 
at the December meeting. On motion of Mr. Sandles, 
seconded by Mr. Welty, Thomas S. Griffith of Spo- 
kane, Washington, was nominated and duly elected 
a member of the Pacific District Board. 

No. 61117, Application for an Order. 

J. B. Stetson, Salem, Oregon, vs. P. J. McCormick, 



1401 10th Ave,, Seattle, Washington, and b. m. "Flora 
Dora Z." Application for an order under Rule 15, 
Section 1. 

The b. m. "Flora Dora Z." was not eligible to the 
2:20 class at Canby, Oregon, and therefore could not 
acquire a record in that event. Case dismissed. 

Proposed Changes in the Rules. 

Acting as a Rule Committee, the Board of Review 
considered the following changes in the rules as 
they now stand, and submit them to the considera- 
tion of secretaries and other racing officials, breed- 
ers, owners, trainers and all persons in any way 
connected with the trotting industry, requesting that 
they read them over carefully, decide whether they 
are good or bad, and make their ideas known prior 
to the meeting of the rule committee, which will 
take piace in the not far distant future. Horsemen 
in general are sufficiently acquainted with the rules 
to identify those in which the changes are proposed, 
and then estimate the improvement effected, or the 
damage done, according to the personal viewpoint, 
and this paper will be pleased to act as the medium 
for expression of any suggestions on these matters: 

Rule 2, governing entries. Amended by adding 
the following Section: 

An entry signed by an officer or representative of 
a member for another person is void. 

Rule 2, Section 7, publishing entries. Amended by 
inserting the words "and state on same all claims for 
time allowances" after the word "entries" in the 
third line. 

Rule 2, govei-ning entries. Further amended by 
adding the following Section: 

An error in any entry may be corrected before the 
day of the race by payment of a fine of five dollars, 
providing the identity of the horse is satisfactorily 
established. 

Rule 5, defining eligibility. Amended by adding 
the following Section: 

(VN'inrace in Postponed, Unfinished and Limited 
Races) 

A winrace acquired in a postponed race shall bear 
the date on which the event was decided. In an 
unfinished race, the horse standing best in the sum- 
mary shall receive first premium and acquire a win- 
race, except when two or more stand equal. In that 
event, none of them shall acquire a winrace in that 
race. In races limited to a specified number of heats 
or dashes the horse standing best in the summary 
shall acquire a winrace. 

Rule 5, Sections 5 and 6, time allowances. Struck 
out and the following substituted: 

(Time Allowances.) 

A horse with a winrace made on a mile track shali 
be allowed one second for each quarter of a mile or 
fraction thereof in the distance to be raced when 
entering on a half-mile track, providing the class to 
which he would be eligible under this allowance is 
not slower than his winrace for the distance on a 
half-mile track. Other allowances may be granted if 
so stated in the published conditions but when offered 
for losing performances or for being behind the 
money in public races they shall be limited to the 
current year. A nominator is also required to claim 
time allowances when making entry and also state 
in same why his horse is entitled to it. Should he 
tail to do so his nomination is not entitled to any 
time allowances in the event. 

Rule 6, Section 1, naming horses. Amended by In- 
serting the words "or in a matinee given by a mem- 
ber" after the word "race" in the third line. 

Rule 18, power of postponement. Amended by In- 
serting the word "received" after the word "forfeits'" 
in the seventeenth line and by inserting the words 
"who have horses on the grounds that are" after 
the word "nominator" in the eighteenth line, making 
the sentence read as follows: When an installment 
plan purse is declared oft' under this Rule, the en- 
trance money and forfeits shall be divided equally 
among the nominators who have horses on the 
grounds that are eligible to start. 

Rule 29, Section 2, barring hobbles on three-year- 
olds or under. Amended by inserting the words "of 
any kind or form" after the word "hopples" in the 
first line. 

Rule 31, relative to heats and horses eligible to 
start. Amended by changing the first sentence to 
read as follows: 

In heats best two in three, a horse not standing 
for money at the finish of the second heat shall not 
start in the th-rd. 

Rule 33, Section 1, time between heats. Changed 
to read as follows: 

The time between heats for any distance up to 
and including a mile shall be twenty-five minutes; 
for any distance between one and two miles, thirty 
minutes; for any distance between two- and three- 
mile heats, thirty-five minutes and for any distance 
between three and four miles, forty minutes. 

Rule 37, Section 1, distance flags. Changed to read 
as follows: 

In all heat races on a mile track, eight yards for 
each furlong raced shall be a distance, except when 
eight or more start in a heat; then ten yards shall 
be a distance. In all heat races on a half-mile track, 
ten yards for each furlong raced shall be a distance, 
except when eight or more start; then twelve yards 
shall he a distance. When a specified series of races 
or heats are given for one entrance fee, the distance 
shall be the same as in heat races of the same length, 
except that it is waived in the last race or heat of 
the series except for fouls. 



Saturday, January 1, 1916] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



b 



TABLE OP DISTANCES 
(Mile Track) 

When under AVhen 8 or 
S start. more start. 

Four Furlongs, V'. mile 32 yds. 40 yds. 

Five " 40 " 50 " 

Six •' ?i mile 48 " 60 " 

Seven " 56 " 70 " 

Eight ■■ 1 mile 54 " 80 " 

Nine " 72 " 90 " 

Ten " IVi miles 80 " 100 " 

(Half-Mile Track) 

When under When S or 
8 start. more start. 

Four Furlongs, mile 40 yds. 48 yds. 

Five " 50 •• 60 " 

Six •' % mile 60 " 72 " 

Seven " 70 " S4 " 

Eight ■• 1 mile 80 " 96 " 

Nine •• 90 " 108 " 

Ten " 114 miles 100 " 120 ■■ 

Rule 42, Section 2, public race and handicap. 
Changed to read as follows: 

(Length of Race and Number of Heats) 

The length of 1. race and the number of heats to be 
contested shall be stated in the published conditions. 
There shall be at least a furlong but not a fractipn 
of one between the length of races; for example, five 
furlongs, six furlongs (three-quarters of a mile), 
eight furlongs (one mile), nine furlongs, etc. If no 
distance or number of heats is specified in the pub- 
lished conditions, all races for four-year-olds and 
over shall be mile heats, three in five; for two- and 
three-year-olds, mile heats, two in three, and year- 
lings a mile dash. In the event of a race being given 
for an irregular distance, for example, seven and one- 
half furlongs, the time made by the winner shall 
create a bar which shall stand as a winrace in deter- 
mining eligibility at eight furlongs (a mile), the next 
regular distance. The time made at a regular dis- 
tance is a record and for the winner of the event a 
winrace for that distance but it is not considered in 
determining eli.gibility for any other distance, and 
until winraces are established at the different dis- 
tances, it is recommended that members designate 
their classes on a mile basis; e. g., a race at six fur- 
longs for horses eligible to the 2; 20 class. 

Rule 43, Section 2, when time becomes a bar. 
Changed to read as follows: 

Any public race at an irregular distance, for exam- 
ple seven and one-half fuiiongs, shall be regarded 
as irregular, and time made at any such distance 
shall create a bar at the next regular distance. 

Rule 44, Section 2, when time is not a record or 
a bar. Amended by adding the following: 

When admission is charged at the gate or grand 
stand if the money collected is divided among the 
horses competing, the time made shall stand as a 
record and winrace as in public races. 

o 

IF IT ISN'T HORSE SENSE IT'S HORSE TALK, 
ANYWAY. 



Nathan Axworthy, Two-lap Champion 



"Don't be surprised because we horses can talk," 
said Miss Dinarth Dot of Washington, 111., in her stall 
at Madison Square Garden, to the writer. "Didn't 
Black Beauty write a book?" 

"I would advise you," Miss Dot continued, to ask 
us for facts if you want to write something about the 
show." 

"I imagine we will see some pretty good form and 
some mighty fine action in the boxes," Mr. King 
Larigo, Miss Dot's father, • interrupted. "I will be 
glad to look over the 1915 debutante class." 

"How you talk, pop," Miss Dot exclaimed. "And 
you a grandfather! You see," she continued to the 
reporter, "Pop insists on looking at this event purely 
from the horse point of view. He seems to think 
he was brought here from Illinois just to look over 
the humans — and him the grand champion stallion 
of the Panama-Pacific exposition." 

"My word!" exclaimed Lady Dilham of Washing- 
ton, who was being manicured and shampooed by a 
whiskered maid. "My word! These creatures from 
the middle west are positively vulgar. Listen to that 
young girl talking to a newspaper reporter!" 

"Rawther," agreed Mr. Irvinglon Model of Hamil- 
ton farm. "Beastly bad form thesp middle western 
horses show!" 

"Listen to Mr. Irvington Model, pop," Miss Dot 
said loudly. "He thinks he's going to be the whole 
cheese at this show. Why, they do say he's got such 
a reputation that Lady Dilham is going to wear extra 
high shoes to get out of his class and into the class 
of Lady Seton. I guess you'll show 'em a few, pop!" 

Mr. Larigo, who is only 41 inches tall, wagged his 
black head and winked at the reporter. 

"I hope there's nothing but class in the boxes," 
he whispered. "I like style and pop." 

"Huh? Whazzat, pop?" Miss Dot asked, pricking 
up her ears. "You wait and see when we get home 
if I don't tell ma how you've been carrying on. He 
rubs noses with all the pretty girls that call on us," 
she added to the reporter. 

"You tell on me," Mr. Larigo retorted, "and I'll tell 
your mother how you can't keep your eyes off the 
silk hat class. Even if she is my daughter and a 
champion — she takes after me in that respect — I 
must say she's a poor judge of human flesh. 

"They've all got to go some to beat my family," 
the old man continued proudly. "Gosh! We cleaned 
up at the Exposition. I had to beat one of my sons 
to be grand champion — Perfection Larigo's his name. 
We took 72 blue ribbons there and 2 grandchampion- 
ships." 

"But they say that Mr. Irvington Model, who has 
James Cox Brady cutting coupons for him, is going 
to be THE horse at this show," called a young lady 
horse, who had ust arrived in her private moving 



j Willmn. L. 1J41 ^.v lliinibletonian 10 

I ' Lady Uunker by 
f Axtell (3) 2:12. ; .Mamb. Patchon bs 

T„„ I Mnmb. Hoy 2:2ii>.; by 

, Mamb, I'atchon .V 

" I ' Uird Mitchel 

> ! by Mamb. Royal 

Kentucky I'rince 
( 2170 



I 



\ Clark Chi>-f 11 by 
Mamb. I'Htclion .58 



Marguerite 



1^ Young Daisy 



a; f Prodigal 2 : 1(1 



I 



I'ancoast 2:21%.. 



Laurel H 



' Kentucky Quncn 
by Morgan ICagle 

^ Stridenway 2111 by 

lilk llwk Telegraph 
'Old Daisy 
untraced 

\ Woodfd. Mamb. 2:21>2 
, by Mamb. Chief 11 
' Hicara 

• by Harold 41:! 

! Rpatrin- \ Cliyler 10(1 

L "t^*""-"^ by Ilambletonian 10 

' Mary Mambrino by 
.Mamb. Patclien fiS 

Sable Wilkes /„ „ 
, cji .).is! I Guy Wukes 2;15J4 

^ ' by Geo. Wilkes 2:22 

( Sable by 

The Moor 870 



Lyla .\ 



\ Arthurton Sa") 

, by llaniblPtoniau 10 

' Flora Laiigford 

by Laiigford, tbbd. 



While it is our general custom to present California 
horses, or those from neighboring states, or chance 
eastern visitors upon our cover page, we take pleas- 
ure in departing from the usual routine long enough 
to introduce to our readers the five-year-old New 
Jersey trotter, Nathan Axworthy 2:09V4. Now before 
somebody jumps up and bawls us out for mis-stating 
Nathan's age allow lis to rise to a point of order long 
enough to state that Nathan was five years of age 
when this was being written, tliough as the paper is 
due to appear on January first, nineteen hundred and 
sixteen, he will undoubtedly be a six-year-old by the 
time you read this. We are careful to call attention 
to these little things in connection with any mention 
of Nathan, because every time we wrote of him last 
spring one of our most esteemed far eastern contem- 
poraries insisted upon disagreeing with us in a very 
pronounced and annoying manner, and we do not 
wish any recurrence of the same at this writing. 
Consequently, in order that our most esteemed far 
eastern contemporary may continue its more re- 
cent course of "requiescatting in peace" so far a.s 
contradicting any remarks of ours concerning Nathan 
is concerned, we admit that he is six years old. 
Having thus evidenced our admiration of our beloved 
president's policy of preparedness by throwing out 
a few safeguards of our own, we will proceed in our 
humble way to express a brief appreciation of the 
good qualities which have united to bring Nathan 
into the limelight as the world's champion halfmile 
track trotter. 

Californians will remember that back in 1912 there 
was quite a little race on for a time between our own 
Lottie Ansel and the Massachusetts filly. Nowaday 
Girl, to decide which should be the champion of the 
age and gait for the season. Lottie finally had the 
best of the argument by a mere matter of half a 
second, but Nowaday Girl was trotting right around 
within a few seconds of the mark, or fractions of it. 
mighty regularly, even going so far as to trot a half- 
mile track in the world's record time of 2:1^%. Of 
course, in the words so long Jlnd so forcibly empha- 
sized, in the advertisements disseminated tliroughout 
our fair land by the ' late Mr. Post, "there's a 
reason" — or, to be more exact and not arouse the 
criticism of our most esteemed far eastern contem- 
porary, there was a reason — the same being material- 
ized in the person of the identical Nathan Axworthy 
of whom we have just been speaking. Nine times 
Nathan heard tlie word go that season, and in every 
one of the nine heats he was a handy second. Twice 
each was he beaten by Nowaday Girl and that good 
futurity trotter, Dillon Axworthy (2) 2:11V4, showing 
such pleasing form that many observers were of the 
opinion that, had he been fitted for such an attempt, 
he would have been able to have taken a record of 
2:10 that season. No effort was made to mark him, 



however, as breeder's records and the like had not 
yet been provided for by the parent associations. 

Having no futurity engagements — and please note 
before going any farther how foolisli those few words 
appear when written of a good colt — his three-year- 
old activities were confined to a careful and not ex- 
tensive ' carrying over" work, in view of taking 
another whirl at the trotters on the Metropolitan 
circuit as a four-year-old. This campaign he accom- 
plished with marked success, winning six out of 
seven starts and retiring at the end of the season 
with a very moderate mark, 2:12Vi. By this time his 
owner was convinced that in Nathan he had some 
real race horse material, and for 1915 he was entered 
in some of the later events on the Grand Circuit, 
being furnished with a few preparatory engagements 
on the "Met," just by way of trying him out. 

The "tryout" w as much more than merely success- 
ful, for on the seventeenth of August, over the his- 
toric track at Goshen, he met and conquered a field 
of nine high class trotters in the world's record time 
of 2:0914, 2:10Vi. 2:091/1, the band going down to 
defeat behind him including Andral, Bronson, Gay 
Audubon, Parclifle and Leo A., all of whom were 
behind the money, while Harry J. S., Raffles and 
Sti-afford had to be content with second, third and 
fourth money, respectively. The following week he 
was given the first real leveling of his life and trot- 
ted the Goshen two-lap course in 2:07, which, had it 
been a public performance, would have constituted 
a world'^ record for a trotting stallion over a track 
of that nature by a matter of three-quarters of a 
second. Convinced that he was ready to meet all 
comers, his trainer took him to the Grand Circuit 
meeting at Empire City Park, and then-, in footing 
that was a niglitniare and gamely endeavoring to 
pull a driver that tips the scales at a figure over the 
two hundred pound mark, he shared the fate of Lee 
Axworthy and received a "cooking" that practically 
settled his chances for the entire season. He was 
.second in the first heat in 2: 09 1,4, but gradually faded 
until the flag caught him in the fourth, still game, 
still tiTing, and still trotting. Later in the year he 
got back to a mile in 2:07 but was never really a* 
himself, and failed to figure seriously in any of his 
later engagements. He retired, and after a brief stud 
season next spring will be prepared for another cam- 
paign on the big line. 

Comment upon Nathan's breeding, other than the 
tabulation which appears at the head of this sketch, 
seems hardly necessaiy, as the salient features of 
the same are so apparent. The family of Axworthy 
is accepted as one of the truly great ones of the 
trotter of today, and through the maternal line the 
quality of tlie houses represented will find favor with 
the most exacting. Californians will note with pleas- 
ure that it runs through producing dams back to the 
same old matron from whom is descended that other 
famous member of the Axworthys, Guy Axworthy, 
sire of this year's M. and M. winner, the foui-th dam 
being the famous old matron Flora Langford trial 
2:24 (dam of Lillian Wilkes (3) 2:1734, etc.) by Lan.c- 
ford, firstborn of California's thoroughbreds. 

Nathan Axworthy is owned by a gentleman who 
numbers many Californians among his circle of 
friends and acquaintances, Andrew Albright Jr., of 
Newark, New Jersey. Mr. Albright spends several 
months each year in the Golden State and in the 
course of the last year has purchased a number of 
California horses, including C. A. Durfee's former 
meal ticket, Zulu Belle 2:061,/, pacing and 2:1014 trot- 
ting, and the good trotter and brood mare Katalina 
2:llVi, whose first foal developed into the fast 
and well mannered three-year-old futurity winner 
Bondalean (3) 2: 06 '4. Both mares are now at Mr. 
Albright's Prospect Farm, just a short distance from 
the city of Newark, and will be mated with Nathan 
Axworthy during the coming season. Other Califor- 
nians at Prospect Farm are the pacing mare Josie 
Ansel 2:14 by Prince Ansel, and the yearling filly 
by The Proof 2:1034 out of Katalina. This young 
lady, by the way, is progressing famously with her 
kindergarten work, which is being given by Isaac 
Hully, who handles the horses at Prospect Farm, and 
looms as a real trotter with ample capacity for adding 
considerably to the renown of both sire and dam. 



van limousine. "They say he has been winning 
everything around these parts." 

"You wait, my dear, until tliey see me and my fam- 
ily," Mr. Larigo replied, looking his horsiest for the 
pretty newcomer. "I can congratulate this Mr. Model 
that he is not in any competition with nnr or any of 
my family. And if he thinks he's going to be the 
whole thing in this show he's got to go some, believe 
me." 

"Look here," Miss Dot said, showing the reporter 
her elbow. "See those scars? That's where I kick 
myself when I am stepping out for the judges. Your 
old Mr. Model — the conceited thing — couldn't step 
any higher than that,. could he?" 

"Now, people, don't bo undignified," advised Mr. 
Earl Grey of Toronto, ('anada, wlio won the Waldorf- 
Astoria cup last year for the best horse suited to gig. 
"You Hackney ponies are always getting into argu- 
ments." 

"Well, you can't eat those things," Mr. Larigo re- 
joined, yawning, "I wish I was back on George A. 



Heyl's farm at liome right now. This show business 
kcei)s me all tir(>d out. I'm sick of it." 

"So are we," said all the horses together. 

P. S. — This interview was translated from horse 
language into English because it appears that very 
few persons — except Ernest Thompson-Seton and one 
or two other authors — are familiar with horse lan- 
guage.— N. Y. \\'orld. 

o 

Do not forgcl lo make that nomination in the State 
Fair Futurity for foals of mares bred in 1915 not 
later than tomorrow, so that the envelope containing 
tlie same will bear a postmark prior to Monday noon. 
o 

Hear in mind that the Year Book for 1915. which 
will be Volume 31 of the series, will be fortlicoinlng 
from the office of the A. T. R. A. early this month. 
It is the one and only "official" publication of the 
season's racing statistics and the price, which has 
been reduced to three dollars, puts it within the 
reach of every horseman and breeder. 



6 



THE BREEDEK AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 1. 1916 



TIME IN NEW ZEALAND IS FASTER. 



While improvements in the breed of ilie American 
trotter and a great advance in the systems of shoe- 
ing, training, hitching, and the conditioning of race 
courses have worked a wonderful increase in the 
speed rate obtainable from our horses of today over 
those of a decade or so ago, the harness horses in 
our sister countries of New Zealand and Australia 
have been making strides of equal import. Horse- 
men in those countries have not only been quick to 
adopt such American methods as appealed to them 
as being fundamentally sound but they have gone 
further and developed to an advanced degree a sys- 
tem of training suited throughout to their particular 
plan of racing, with the result that their horses are 
improving in speed and endurance in a most gratify- 
ing manner. \\ ith the totalisator as a means of 
investment, with the governing bodies constantly on 
the watch for ways and means of improving the 
quality of the racing as a means of providing popu- 
lar amusement, and with breeders steadily improving 
their stock by infusing new strains of blood from 
the established American families, conditions in gen- 
eral have reached a most gratifying slate, and the 
industry of breeding and racing the harness horse 
is on a most oNcellent basis. The New Zealand 
Referee's following brief review of the recent spring 
meeting at Addington gives a good idea of the 
healthy condition of the sport there and the ad- 
vances being made in the way of extreme speed pro- 
duction: 



When the stake for the New Zealand Trotting Club 
was raised to £2500 and the total amount given in 
stakes, at the Spring Meeting was increased to 
£10,000, there were some members of the New Zea- 
land Metropolitan Trotting Club who were rather 
apprehensive as to the result. We feel sure that 
they have no misgivings now as to the wisdom of the 
policy adopted, for the success that has been achieved 
proves that, unless the circumstances are altogether 
exceptional, good stakes will attract good horses, 
and bring about keen competition. The meeting 
held at Addington on Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday 
of last week must be regarded as in every way suc- 
cessful, and for a gathering held under war condi- 
tions it was brilliantly so. It was unfortunate that 
the downpour of rain that followed the contest for 
the New Zealand Cup on the first day should have 
so seriously affected the remainder of that day's 
racing, but luckily the most valuable event of the 
year was decided on a track which, though somewhat 
slow, was not in bad condition for racing, and as a 
matter of fact, was improving with every race. 

The times recorded on the first day were naturally 
affected by the state of the going, but with careful 
attention in the interval, the track was in splendid 
condition for the racing on Thursday and Friday, and 
some very high-class performances were registered. 
It is recognized amongst the followers of the sport 
that it takes a good horse to win a race at Adding- 
ton; with the gradual reduction of the handicap 
limits the standard of the horses competing there 
is steadily improving, and we may take it for grant- 
ed that the club's executive will continue the present 
policy which will have the effect of making a victory 
on its course the hall-mark of really genuine merit. 
The racing all through was full of interest, and for 
his share in bringing about that result the club's 
handicapper, Mr. H. Brinkman, is entitled to con- 
gratulation. As for the business side of the meeting, 
when we say that it was quite up to the usual Adding- 
ton standard, it will be understood that Mr. A. J. 
Rattray, the club's very capable and experienced 
secretary, had all the necessary machinery for the 
work in smooth-running order. The New Zealand 
Cup has so often failed to produce a contest worthy 
of such a valuable stake that it was a gratifying 
change to find it bringing about a better race than 
usual. It would, however, have been better still had 
all the competitors left their marks properly, but, 
unfortunately, several of the horses engaged lost 
their chances at the start. The winner. Country 
Belle, began brilliantly, and though she was not the 
public favorite, her victory gained her owner, Mr. 
W. J. Moreland. many congratulations, for he bred 
and trained this year's winner, and her perform- 
ances, including her second place in last year's race, 
have shown her to be a very high class mare. Our 
Thorpe registered a fine performance in finishing 
second after losing ground at the start, and in view 
of his form in the free-for-all on Thursday, he must 
have been very much harder to beat in the Cup had 
he begun much more quickly. 

The free-for-all, which was the star attraction of 
Thursday's program, arou.sed exceptional interest, 
and no finer exhibition of speed than that displayed 
by Our Thorpe l\as been witnessed on the Addington 
track. He registered time that was much faster than 
the previous Australasian record for the distance, 
and the fact that during the race Our Thorpe was 
clocked to cover a mile in 2:. 5 2-5, and Country Belle 
a mile in 2:6, proves that the speed of our best 
horses is much greater now than they were able to 
show a few years ago. We have not yet reached the 
American standard, but in view of the different con- 
ditions, we are not so very far behind. A race such 
as the free-for-all adds distinction to a program, and 
we feel sure the committee would find it a wise pol- 
icy to give more encouragement to the best horses 
by putting on a similar contest each day of the 
meeting. 



PROBLEM FOR GRAND CIRCUIT STEWARDS. 



When the stewards of the Grand Circuit meet in 
Cleveland, .Tan. 11, they will have other subjects to 
thrash out in addition to the forming of a compact 
racing line for the 1916 season. Our old friend, the 
limitation of winnings, will be brought up again, 
President Devereux having revised the proposition 
which came near to being put through in 1913, limit- 
ing the stake winnings of a trotter to $15,000, and 
of a pacer to $10,000, after accumulating which 
amount they would be eligible only to such stakes 
as their records at that time left them eligible; in 
other words the early closing dates would not act 
as a protection, and after a horse had won up to the 
limit, there would be a new closing date (for him) 
to the balance of the events. 

* * * 

In 1913 and 1914 there was no trotter to "hog" the 
money in the big stakes of the Grand Circuit, Tenara 
promising to do so early in 1913, but breaking down 
long before the season was ended, and Lassie Mc- 
Gregor duplicating this performance the following 
year. This left the major portion of the money in the 
stakes fairly well split up among several horses, but 
last season Tom Murphy came along with that iron 
horse, Peter Scott, and monopolized practically every- 
thing in sight in the stake line, not only on the 
Grand Circuit, but also at the Panama-Pacific Expo- 
sition meeting at San Francisco, in November. 

With the exception of the $10,000 M. and M. stake 
at Detroit, in which he was beaten by Lee Axworthy. 
Peter Scott won every one of the Grand Circuit clas- 
sics for aged hoises (the Tavern "Steak" at Cleve- 
land is not included, as the peculiar conditions of the 
event barred Peter Scott). This was just what had 
been predicted a:- likely to happen by the critics, for 
Peter Scott had shown himself in 1914 to be a 2:05 
trotter, who would race right around that notch every 
time it was necessary to do so to win. Had Lee Ax- 
worthy remained good all season the sailing might 
not have been so easy for the "brown bear" from 
Pittsburgh, but the star four-year-old made only 
three starts after the M. and M. and in one of these 
was taken into camp by Peter Scott. In practically 
all of the races of the latter after the M. and M. he 
was conceded the first money before the start, being 
barred in the auctions at any of the meetings where 
open pooling was permitted. 

* ^ * 

Not only the example of Peter Scott during the 
past season, but the fact that a condition exists at 
the present time which promises a repetition of the 
performance with another actor in the role of star 
in 1915, has caused the revival of the limitation of 
winnings rule, which was smothered three years ago. 
This time it is another Peter, the Cleveland trotter, 
Peter Mac 2:03V^. who has yet to start in a race, but 
is pronounced by the best judges as a trotter more 
than likely to beat 2:00 the coming season. He has 
been a half, driven by a driver nearly four score 
years of age, in 59 seconds, and that is more speed 
than has ever been shown by any other trotter, with 
the exception of Plilan and Lou Dillon, both of whicli 
crossed the two-minute mark. 

The proposition which Presideht Devereux will put 
up to the stewards at their annual meeting is far dif- 
ferent from that of three years ago, as it provides 
two events for each Grand Circuit meeting, one for 
trotters and one for pacers, the entrants limited to 
horses which never have won a certain named 
amount; then, after a horse races for a time and his 
winnings reach another named amount he shall auto- 
matically become ineligible to these events, although 
his racing career will be protected by his also becom- 
ing automatically eligible to other early closing 
events to which his best records leave him eligible, 
ev<>n though ho may not have been named in such 
events at the time the entries closed. 

* * * 

The conditions of the trotting stake which the 
Devereux proposition, if adopted, will make one of 
the features of every meeting in membership with 
the Grand Circuit, is as follows: 

For trotters which have never won over $2,000 
gross. $5,000; to be raced for in three heats; $1,200 
for the first heat, $1,500 for the second, $1,800 for the 
third heat. Purst: in each heat to be divided 50, 25, 
15 and 10 per cent. Of the balance $150 to the win- 
ner of the event, $150 to the driver of the winner, 
and $200 to the horses standing fifth and sixth, 
respectively, in the final summary, of which 70 per 
cent goes to the horse standing fifth and 30 per cent 
to the horse standing sixth. Any division of the 
money not won by any other starter to go to the 
winner of the race. A distanced or drawn horse 
retains what money he may have won, but loses his 
position in the race. 

Of the horses that start in the third heat the win- 
ner of the event shall be the horse not distanced 
that has won the most money gross. Should there 
be a tie in the gross amount won the horses tied 
shall race a fourth heat to determine the winner. 

A horse entered in these events shall be eligible 
to start until it has won $7,000 gross in them, when 
it becomes ineligible to start again in them and all 
entrance money in the stakes to which it has become 
ineligible shall be refunded and it shall be entitled 
to start in any early closing event to which its win- 
ning race record made it eligible at the time it was 
barred. 

The conditions of the pacing stake are identical 
except in the amounts, the stakes being for $3,000, 



and the horse lecome ineligible when it has won 
$5,000 gross. These conditions would not in any way 
interfere with the regular events, early closing or 
otherwise, but it would be compulsory on each asso- 
ciation in the Grand Circuit membership to give 
such events. 

* * * 

It is possible that there will be opposition to the 
rule providing for these events from associations 
which maintain valuable classics, such as Detroit, 
with its M. and M.; Kalamazoo, with its Paper Mills 
Stake, or Syracuse, with its Empire State Stake, all 
for $10,000, the management figuring that the addi- 
tion of a $5,000 stake for trotters to its list of events 
will draw entries from the big stakes, certain own- 
ers refusing to take a chance against the cracks 
which are sure to be named for the classics when 
they realize thut they have a chance to race for 
$5,000 and avoid meeting the Peter Scotts of the 
future. However, it appears that some change must 
be made in the conditions governing early closing 
events in order to avoid a repetition of 1915 Grand 
Circuit history; a year in which the identity of the 
winner of every one of the rich stakes raced subse- 
(luent to the M. and M. was practically a settled fact 
long before the horses were brought upon the track. 
Possibly the Devereux proposition will go a long way 
toward making such a repetition impossible; at least 
it looks to be worth a trial. — Western Horseman. 

o 

BETTING RULES AND REGULATIONS AT NEW 
ORLEANS. 



New Orleans, La.. December 19. — The rules and 
regulations governing the betting at the Fair Grounds 
during the coming race meeting, beginning January 
1, were made known and will be posted prominently 
throughout the grounds. A copy handed down by 
Joseph A. Murphy follows: 

"Individual betting is legal under the civil and 
criminal code of Louisiana and only individual bet- 
ting will be permitted on these premises. No one 
must set up a place for the purpose of betting with 
any sheets, blackboard or paraphernalia of any char- 
acter. 

"There must be no display of odds, even on a pro- 
gram, nor any soliciting of betting. There must be 
no crying of odds. Each bet must be an individual 
transaction and the management requests that indi- 
vidual betters see that their bet is sealed by the in- 
dividual stakeholder before leaving the place. 

"Individual stakeholders are employed for the pro- 
tection of the public. They are hired by the Business 
Men's Racing Association and no one has any author- 
ity to hire or discharge an individual stakeholder ex- 
cept the management. These men are under a prop- 
erly executed bond. They shall receive no fee or tip 
and shall make no bets or have any money in their 
possession for the purpose of betting. Any stake- 
holder who refuses to hold an individual bet will be 
summarily discharged and patrons are especially re- 
quested to report to the management any incivility 
on the part of any stakeholder. 

"Patrons are cautioned to get the correct number 
of the stakeholder so that he may be located, and 
they are requested to look carefully at the envelope 
before they sign it so as to avoid mistakes. 

"Stakeholders will be compelled to rectify any mis- 
takes made by them, but the signatures of the bet- 
ters in acceptance of the terms of the aleatory con- 
tract will be considered as final. 

"Individual stakeholders shall have in their pos- 
session no device to encourage, promote, aid or assist 
any person or persons to bet or wager; they shall 
simply witness and adjust a legal, aleatory contract 
after it has been consummated by two individuals." 

Another notice issued to horsemen by Manager 
Joseph A. ^Murphy was that relating to selling races 
and claiming of beaten horses. It follows: 

"In all selling races the winner will not be sold 
at auction. At any time within fifteen minutes after 
the official board has been displayed any person in 
good standing may put in a sealed bid for the winner 
with the clerk of the scales or the racing secretary. 
Money for this bid must accompany the bid unless 
the person bidding has sufficient funds in the office 
to cover the bid. Bids may be made in units of $100. 
Failure to place the proper amount in the envelope 
will not vacate the bid, but it will be considered in 
force to the amount of the even $100 under the frac- 
tion of $100 that might be placed in the envelope. 
Thus, for example, if there should be $725 in the 
envelope the bid will be accepted as $700. When the 
envelopes are opened the owner of the horse will lw> 
notified and will have the option of protecting the 
horse for the customary $5 or letting it go to the 
highest bidder, to whom an order for the horse will 
be given. Should there be two bids for the same 
amount, those bidding will draw lots for the horse. 
One-half of the surplus arising from this will go to 
the second horse and the other half to a special fund 
to be available for any emergency, charitable or 
otherwise that may arise. All other horses are eligi- 
ble to claim by any one in good standing for an 
amount equal to the first money of the purse. When 
such horses have been claimed they shall not be 
elis-'ible for sale or transfer by private treaty for a 
period of thirty days, but, of course, will be subject 
to sale or claim in any selling race in which they 
may run. When two or more persons claim the same 
horse priority shall be determined by lot except that 
the owner of the winner shall have his claim vacated 
if other claims are in for the same horse. No person 
may claim more than one horse." 



Saturday, January 1, 19161 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



i NOTES and NEWS i 

i ? 
i ? 

* ^, 
yy.««0"»"»"»"«"«"«"«"«-»"»-«"«"«"«**«"*"«- •-•"••••-•-•"•"•••••••••••••"•-•-••43 

Happy New Year! 
And a prosperous one. 

<«><$><$> 

Remember ilvM all the horses arc a year older than 
thev were yesterday. 

A sure sign that "winter is with us" is found in the 
green grass that is starting so generously in the wake 
of the recent rains. 

^<«>^ 

Speaking of winter — a recent letter from Tommy 
Gahagan, the itinerant turf tattler, tells of hard- 
earned money spent for ear-muffs, wristlets, woolen 
mittens, a big overcoat and a pair of fleece-lined 
arctic overshoes. 

No, gentle reader, he is not in Chicago, either, but 
away down south in Indianapolis. Speaking of Chi- 
cago, however, speaking of Chicago: 
<$> <«> <♦> 

The editorial staff of our sole surviving contem- 
porary may have some weird conceptions of what 
constitutes a climatic paradise, but you have to hand 
it to 'em on this Christmas number proposition. 
Taking the present Christmas number "by and large," 
as is Kin Hubbard's favorite way, the Review folks 
have certainly done themselves proud, if they will 
pardon our homely phraseology. 

Any horseman whose wife is so darned stingy that 
she will not stake him to the two bits required to 
procure a copy has adequate grounds for a suit for 
divorce. 

•«>^<S> 

The Western Horseman's number, also, aside from 
that portion contributed by yours truly, reflects great 
credit to its publishers and to the enterprise of its 
patrons, while the Christmas editions of the Trotter 
and Pacer and the American Horse Breeder are also 
exceptionally aiti active from every viewpoint. One 
or two other publications are due at this writing, 
but are probably delayed in transit by the rush of 
holiday mail. 1 o each and every one of them we 
extend our heartiest fraternal wishes for success and 
prosperity during the coming season. 

<?><«> 4> 

Having thus disposed of a pleasant duty, permit 
this pointed personal question, Mr. Broodmare 
Owner — have you made those nominations in the 
State Fair Futurity for foals of mares bred in 1915? 
This is absolutely the last reminder. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. \V. Longley, who for some months 
have made their temporary home at the Hotel Oak- 
land, left a few days ago for their ranch near Bishop, 
Inyo county, where they will spend an indefinite 
period. In the meantime, Henry Smith and Hiram 
Rapelje will continue the education of the Longley 
colts at the Pleasanton Driving Park. 

The second "Businessmen's Race Meeting" begins 
at New Orleans today, with some seven hundred of 
the best horses of the country quartered in the sta- 
bles there. The pick of California and Nevada thor- 
oughbreds are in, attendance and their friends here 
are confident that they will return a most axcellent 
account of themselves every time they come to the 
gate and get an even break in the racing luck. Here's 
hoping. 

<S><J><S> 

Adolph Ottinger, dean of the San Francisco mat- 
inee drivers, arrived home from a trip into the wilds 
of eastern Oregon just in time for the Christmas 
festivities. His interests in the Burns country are 
growing and he threatens to spend most of his time 
there during the coming year. He has only three 
horses left at present out of the many he has owned 
at various times, and as several parties are showing 
inclinations to purchase those three, the indications 
are that "Ott" will soon be "a-foot." 

«>^«> 

It has long been the opinion of various members of 
the Grand Circuit strategy boards that the fast 
California-bred pacer Del Rey 2:03% would be a 
greatly improved horse if subjected to the process 
of castration. So thoroughly and widely has this 
notion been disseminated that the alteration has 
finally become an accomplished fact, so that summary 
writers next summer will have to remember to make 
it "b g" in stead of "b h." 

<?><«><8> 

In spite of the fact that the war in Europe has 
made great inroads upon the horseflesh of all the 
countries involved in the titanic struggle, Seci-etary 
Wayne Dinsmore of the Perchcron Society of Amer- 
ica has just received word by cable from President 
Aveline of the I'ercheron Society of France to the 
effect that the government has authorized the expor- 
tation of two hundred stallions, foaled in 1912 or 
earlier, so that American breeders have not yet 
reached the point where they must be dependent 
upon the products; of their own farms for the contin- 
uance of their operations. The American-bred draft 
horse, however, is very rapidly coming into his own 
and prices for homegrown individuals of pure lineage 
and proper type was never stronger. 



Thomas S. Griffith of Spokane has been elected to 
membership on the Pacific District Board of Review 
of the National Trotting Association, to fill the 
vacancy caused some months ago by the death of 
the late Colonel J. C. Kirkpatrick of this city. Mr. 
Griffith is well known in trotting horse circles 
throughout the northwest and west and his selection 
will meet with the approbation of horsemen in gen- 
eral. 

<S> •$><«> 

,T. E. Bransford of Salt Lake, twice mayor of that 
mid-continental metropolis and a steadfast friend of 
the harness horse for many years prior to the time 
of the sprouting of his first political aspirations, 
arrived back in California a few days ago on his 
annual pilgrimage and is stopping at the Lankershim 
at Los Angeles, spending a due portion of his day- 
light hours at Exposition Park, where he is an ever 
welcome figure. 

His Honor the Mayor, in other words Bert Shank, 
generally has a few good ones eating hay and oats 
somewhere in his immediate vicinity at his strong- 
hold at North Randall, but this winter he has gradu- 
ated into the Charley Dean class with a whoop, hav- 
ing at piesent a total of three score and one trotters 
and pacers in a more or less advanced state of devel- 
opment dependent upon him for the little old three 
a day — not forgetting the proper amount of exercise. 
He certainly runs small danger of suffering from 
either lonesomeness or inaction with this delegation 
to provide for. 

❖ <$><^ 

The various charities of the city of Baltimore will 
be benefitted to the extent of some thirteen thousand 
dollars as a result of the recent fall meeting of the 
Maryland .lockey Club. It is the club's custom, to 
donate all proceeds of their events in excess of six 
per cent "legitimate profit" to some worthy cause, 
the surplus in this instance aggregating the neat sum 
just mentioned. If such a course of procedure were 
made universal, with the mode of speculation re- 
stricted to the totalisator or the pari-mutuel machine, 
there would be very much less of an outcry againsj 
racing. 

<$><?><$> 

"They're off at Tia Juana!" The inaugural meeting 
of the Lower California .lockey Club was ushered in 
today, under what from this distance seem to be 
fairly auspicious circumstances. The few horses 
remaining at tracks in this neck of the woods were 
shipped down early this week, and special rates on 
the railroads attracted quite a number of the regu- 
lars from this and neighboring cities. Juarez is hav- 
ing some tribulations, and it is not improbable that 
a number of owners will ship from that point to Tia 
Juana in the near future, and Tia Juana can use the 
horses to a good advantage. 

There will be a special matinee held Christmas 
(next Saturday) morning on the Lincoln Park speed- 
way, that it is expected will be one of the most intei'- 
esting of the entire season in Chicago, as in addition 
to the cracks of the North Side, a number of the best 
horses from other parts of the city will also be in 
evidence, the present probability being that some- 
thing like twenty starters in the various events. Al 
Whitney will start Blue Line p. 2:08Vi and others, 
.lohnny Bangert will start one or two. A. G. I. 2:14Vi 
will be on hand, as usual, and Dr. Brook, the green 
half-brother of Dr. Burns Jr. 2:04%, will take the 
word. Dr. Fisher will be represented by his pacing 
mare Swamp Maiden 2:1614 and his fast Bingen colt, 
Bingen Bond 2,:2ZV%. The racing will begin at 10 
a. m., and the entertainment will be enjoyable. The 
surface of the speedway has been placed in excellent 
condition and will enable the horses to step fast 
over it. — Horse Review. 



TOO MUCH WATER CAUSES DECREASE IN 
ALFALFA YIELDS. 



More water means less Instead of more alfalfa, 
once a certain limit has been reached. 

This is the valuable lesson of a six-year field test 
just completed by the Irrigation Investigations of 
the University of California at the University Farm 
at Davis. It was shown that, contrary to accepted 
belief, a limit is soon reached above which the yield 
of alfalfa actually decreases with increasing amounts 
of irrigation water applied. 

In. these tests, one-quarter acre checks were used, 
and each test was duplicated. Quantities of water 
varying from 12 to 60 inches were applied to the 
various checks. Two checks wer(> l(>ft unirrigAtiHl 
as check plats. The average yield for six years from 
the unirrigated checks was 4.07 tons of hay per acre. 

The largest average yield, 9.28 tons, was produced 
by applying 36 acre-inches of water per acre, in four 
nine-inch irrigations. 

But the most economical yield was produced with 
30 aci-e-inches of water per acre applied in four 7'^- 
inch irrigations, 8:99 tons of alfalfa hay being pro- 
duced. The average increase in yield of .29 tons 
per acre by using 36 instead of 30 inches in a seaswi 
was not sufficient to pay for the increased cost in 
water and labor. Between nothing and 30 inches, 
the yields increased uniformly with the increased 
amounts of water applied. 

A slight decrease in yield was shown from four 
12-inch irrigations, while a decided decrease resulted 
from four 15-inch irrigations, which produced but 
8.20 tons of hay per acre. 



CHRISTMAS MATINEE AT SANTA ANA. 



Santa Ana, Dec. 25, 1915. — "White Christmases" 
that professional Califomians from the corn belt 
talk so much about may be all right in their way in 
countries where the folks are used to them, but most 
anyone would have a hard time finding any real fault 
with the kind of a Christmas enjoyed here today, 
with the sun warm and bright and harness racing as 
the feature of the afternoon portion of the celebra- 
tion. Four races were contested before a nice crowd 
by members of the Orange County Driving Club, and 
with Santa Claus present in the grandstand in per- 
son with a remembrance of some sort for every 
person in attendance a genuine good time was the 
result. From the way the public takes to the mat- 
inee racing here it looks as though the trotter is 
"coming back" in great shape so far as this partic- 
ular locality is concerned. 

W. R. Murphy, who on the occasion of the last 
matinee spreadeagled the card by taking first in 
every event, was a bit tamer today, and while he 
was a hard one for the boys to handle they man- 
aged to take him into camp in style that rather 
evened things up, only one event going to his entry. 
Two newcomers to the green class accounted for 
that number, which started things off for the day, 
Fred Culver's seven-year-old trotter Brownie taking 
the second and third heat after Babe, a big fat mare 
owned ten miles out in the country, had won the first 
heat. The latter is owned by S. Teneick and could 
trot a twenty gait if given only a very little work. 
Murphy scored a win with Black Diamond after rac- 
ing a nice contest with Fritz Schultz and Laddie, 
with three heats right in the notch from 2:28 to 2:29. 
Fred Cole with Atlantic Fleet bested Miss Patterson 
and Buster L. in the 2:25 pace, while Dr. H. J. Stev- 
ens with Doctor S. hung up the two fastest heats of 
the day in the 2:20 trot, winning the first in 2:19 
and coming back in 2:18, with Dick W. and Tommy 
Murphy right at his heels. The summaries: 

(jreen Class: 

Biowney (Fred Culver) 3 11 

H.ahc (S. Teneick) 1 .S 3 

Wanna Wilkes, by .San Juan (W. R. Murphy) 2 2 2 

Strathwav .Jr., b u by Strathvvay (H. E. Johnson) 4 4 4 

Carpus, b h by Barondale (A. E. Waern) h 5 dr 

Time— 2:40, 2:39. 2:37V2. 

2:30 Mi.xed: 

Black Diamond (W. R. Murphy) 1 2 1 

Laddie, bl g by Aladdin (Fritz Schultz) 2 12 

Midnight (Johnny Fries) 3 3 3 

Time— 2:29, 2:28, 2:28iA 

2:2.5 Pace: 

Atlantic Fleet, ch K by Murray M (Fred Cole) 1 1 

Buster L., ch « by Zolock (W. ,T. Lindsey) 2 3 

Mis.s Patterson, b m by Zenith (W. K. Murphy) 3 2 

Time— 2:24, 2:24U. 

2:20 Trot: 

Doctor S., b K by Carlokin (Dr. H. J. Steven.s) 1 1 

Dick W.. b g bv Walter Barker (W. R. Murphy) 2 2 

Toinmv Murphy, b pr by Red McK...(F. AV. Faucett) 3 3 
Time— 2:19, 2:18. 

O 

MRS. E. F. GEERS ANSWERS LAST SUMMONS. 



The countless thousands of friends and acquaint- 
ances of Edward F. Geers will be pained to learn 
that this Christmas was for him one of the saddest 
of his lifetime, the devoted wife who for so many 
years has been always with him having answered to 
the call out upon the long journey from which there 
is no return. For many months past Mrs. Geers' 
health has been the occasion of much concern to her 
friends, her life having been despaired of twice dur- 
ing the year just passed. Plucky rallies on both 
occasions led to the hope of her eventual return to 
complete health, but such a blessing was not to be 
hers, and on Sunday, December 19, at her home in 
Memphis, death put an end to both hope and suffer- 
ing. A member of the Review staff who had the 
pleasure of knowing her, writes in part of her death 
as follows: "Mrs. Geers was in every way an excel- 
lent and admirable woman, the most faithful and 
devoted of wives and mothers, enjoying the respect 
and esteem of all who knew her and the sincere love 
and affection of her friends and close acquaintances. 
While only on rai'e occasions was she sec^n at the 
races, she being by preference inconspicuous in her 
tasti^s and ways of life, she was nevertheless deeply 
interested in her luisband's success in his profession 
and had, throughout their long wedded life, been of 
aid and assistance to him in many ways in attaining 
his eminent position, while the reputation which he 
enjoyed was to her a source of intense pride and 
gratification. Of the children which blessed their 
union, the only son, Edward F., named for his father, 
was accidentally killed som(> y(>ars ago, but a daugh- 
ter who has been the close companion and devoted 
ininistrant to her mother during the latter's pro- 
tracl(>d illness, remains to mourn her loss." 

Horsemen throughout the west will be quick and 
sincere in joining the Breeder and Sportsman in ex- 
t(mding to their bereaved friend and his daughter 
their most h(>artfelt sympathy and respect in this 
moment of sorrow and distress. 

o 

NEW PARK AMATEUR DRIVING CLUB. 



San Francisco, Cal., Dec. 28, 1915. 

To Members: 

The annual meeting of New Park Amateur Driving 
Club will be held in Parlor A, Palace Hotel, Monday, 
January 3, 1910, at 8 o'clock p. m. for the purpose of 
electing officers for the ensuing year, and such other 
business as may be brought before the meeting. 
Respectfully yours, 

F. W. THOMPSON, Secretary. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 1, 1916 



HEREDITY IN BEEF PRODUCTION. 



The art of breeding beef cattle of superior merit 
is an accompliiihment of which relatively few Amer- 
ican farmers can boast. Occasionally by the purchase 
of a prepotent bull or by the fortuitous possession of 
an exceptionally good breeding cow, a breeder gets 
started in the right direction, and is able to follow the 
proper course for a number of years. A study, how- 
ever, of the records of the large shows indicates that 
the average life of an exhibitor is less than 5 years. 

Sporadic attempts have been made, with varying 
degree ol success, to establish a dual-purpose type. 
For the most part these attempts have failed to 
make good in popular esteem and probably in func- 
tion, so far as a given individual is concerned. There 
are undoubtedly a few cows of good beef conforma- 
tion which produce a large amount of milk in every 
neighborhood. The great difficulty, however, has 
been that they do not breed true to type, in the 
majority of instances. 

W'itii the tremendous demand for dual-purpose cat- 
tle, and the failure of many attempts to produce 
.them from Shorthorn, Red Polled, Holstein. Brown 
Swiss, and occasionally even from Jersey and Here- 
ford cattle, it seems that the methods used to date 
have for the most part been incorrect. We may 
yet be able, with a more careful study of the func- 
tional process involved in the production of beef and 
milk, to establish a breed or a strain which is much 
more efficient than any that we now have. 

In order to have a sufficient number of cattle for 
instructional purposes at the Kansas State Agricul- 
tural College, three breeds of beef cattle, Aberdeen, 
Hereford and Shorthorn, are maintained. Calves 
suitable to show as fat steers are selected from each 
crop rather than purchased. This year 5 entire 
steers steer herds were shown, every member of 
which was bred on the college farm. Close observa- 
tion of the dams of these cattle reveals the fact that 
in no instance has a show steer been selected from 
a cow which would be placed at the top of the herd 
of breeding females to which she belongs, if the 
showyard standards usually used in placing aged 
breeding cows were applied. As a rule she would 
be well down toward the foot of the class. The thick- 
est cows have not produced the best calves. 

In other words, cows which are noi of the ac- 
cepted beef typf transmit beeflness to their sons and 
also to their daughters, as is shown by their form 
previously to their first calving. When the heifers 
enter the ranks of matrons they lose to some extent 
the rotundity and symmetry of form and become a 
little sharper over the withers, longer and more 
slender in the neck. Hatter in the rib, heavier in the 
barrel, and thinner in the thighs. Hence beefiness 
is either a secondary sex character of the male, 
transmitted in the same manner as the crest, burly 
head, and heavy horn, or else it is a character which 
is tremendously disrupted by feminine functional ac- 
tivity. Perhaps this disruption results from the 
shrinkage of th(> deposit of fat in the thicker mus- 
cles, due to extraction during milk production, thus 
changing the form of the individual without altering 
her type. 

Through the (o-operation of the animal husbandr>' 
division of the Bureau of Animal Industry the Kan- 
sas Experiment Station is inaugurating an experi- 
ment in breeding purebred Shorthorn cattle which 
will continue through 20 years. The project has been 
approved by the Office of States Relations as meet- 
ing the lequirenients for prosecution under the Ad- 
ams' F\ind. Thi.i fund was specifically appropriated 
for fundamental problems which are not of such a 
nature as to permit a report to popularize the experi- 
mental work of the institution. 

The general olan in securing the foundation experi- 
mental stock was to secure 20 Shorthorn cows from 
the best beef herds in the United States and Canada, 
each one of which had produced at least one calf 
decidedly above the average of the herd from which 
the cow was selected. Each cow must have a sound, 
well-balanced udder and must have produced more 
milk than her calf was able to take during the early 
part of her period of lactation. 

Following thi.s method of selection a variety of 
types has been secured, some individuals of which 
would not pass muster under the critical eye of a 
judge looking for beefiness in a breeding female. 
Represented in the foundation stock are the herds 
of Cowan of Virginia. Carpenter & Ross, Edwards and 
West of Ohio, Robbins and Silverthorne of Indiana, 
Edwards of Canada, Brown. Forbes, Kreigh, Kilgour 
and Prather of Illinois, Leonard of Missouri, Saun- 
ders of Iowa. Kane of Nebraska, and Hill and Tomson 
of Kansas. 

Many other herds were visited where suitable cows 
were found, but the owners refused to sell them. 
In a few instances correspondence indicated that the 
breeders were not particularly interested, but in the 
majority of instances the most hearty co-operation 
was secured, and animals were allowed to leave the 
farms with which the owners would not have parted 
In any other circumstances. It will be noticed that 
the majority of the cattle come from the cornbelt 
and from herds which have made a reputation in the 
showyard and salering. Individuals from the Au- 
gusta, Clipper, Mina, Secret, Gwendoline, Jealousy, 
Duchess of Gloster, Clara, Narcissus, Roan Lady, 
Marr Bessie, Orange Blossom, Lavender, Lovely and 
several Scotch-topped families are included in the 
foundation stock. The purpose was to secure cattle 
from herds and from families which were noted for 
the production of beef cattle. 



The cows were assembled at Manhattan, where 
they will be carried on pasture until calving time. 
So soon as calves are dropped they will be taken 
from their dams, placed on nurse-cows and developed 
according to the best practice of the breeding of 
purebred beef cattle. The cows will be fed and man- 
aged according to the best methods of dairy breed- 
ers. A junior and senior calf will be castrated each 
year and be developed as show steers. Thus the value 
of the calves on a beef basis and the ability of the 
cows to produce milk can be determined. 

The bull to be used at the head of the herd is 
Matchless Dale, a son of Avondale and the sire of the 
first-prize junior and senior Shorthorn steer calves 
and reserve champion at the 1913 International, the 
first-prize senior calf at the 1913 Royal, the champion 
steer of all breeds and ages at the 1914 Denver show, 
and the first-prize steer calf at the 1914 Kansas State 
Fair, the only exhibit made last year. The first prize 
on the two-year-old Shorthorn steer, the first prize 
on the calf, and the first prize on the herd and cham- 
pionship for steers were awarded to the get of this 
bull at the 1915 American Royal. In other words, the 
head of the herd is a tried Shorthorn bull of beef 
type. As an individual he would, if fitted, rank 
among the best aged bulls of the breed. 

After the experiment has progressed sufficiently, 
each year the best milk producing cow will, if pos- 
sible, be bred to the Shorthorn bull whose calves 
have won in the get of sire classes at the Interna- 
tional. In this way it is hoped to keep the best beef 
blood in the herd and provide a check on the .gen- 
eral matings. 

The ultimate purpose of the experiment is to deter- 
mine whether or not beefiness is an attribute of sex, 
and in what way it is related to functional develop- 
ment. A careful study of the pedigrees of Interna- 
tional and Royal championship winners indicates 
that a championship bull is apt to produce cham- 
pions. With the exceptions of Ruberta and Golden 
Abbotsburn, both of which appear in the pedigree of 
Ruberta's Goods, no champion Shorthorn female of 
either of these gieat shows appears as dam, grandam 
or great-grandam in the pedigree of a champion. 
Whether this is due to the excessive development 
necessary to win a championship, or that the type 
selected is wrong, or that when a cow produces a 
calf and large quantities of milk her form changes, 
are questions upon which this experiment will give 
information. 

As the experiment progresses light may be thrown 
upon the dual-purpose type. In selecting beef cattle 
the breeder has usually chosen the fat steer as his 
ideal, and varies from this type only far enough to 
secure evidence of masculinity in the male and fem- 
ininity in the female, in other respects selecting each 
sex upon the same basis. The dairyman has used 
the type associated with high production in the 
female and selects the bull as nearly to that type 
as his sex will permit. By using beef bulls from 
high-producing dams, and selecting cows upon their 
ability to produce, a double standard may result, one 
for males and another for females, rather than a 
dual-purpose type, which is a compromise between 
two ideals. 

As the majority of the cows range in age from 5 
to 8 years, many of them never having been even 
halter-broken, all of them having suckled calves and 
none having betui hand-milked, their first year's per- 
formance at the pail will not represent their actual 
producing capacity. Probably many similar difficul- 
ties will be encountered before the experiment has 
settled down to a smoothly-running basis. 

Every precaution has been used to see that the 
experiment will continue through a long period of 
years. This is essential, because under the best of 
conditions 6 years are required to replace a mature 
breeding herd with their offspring. When time is 
taken to select a definite type from the original herd, 
20 years, the proposed duration of this experiment, 
may prove to be insufficient. In that time, however, 
some indication of the trend of the herd should be 
evident. — Breeders' Gazette. 

o 

U. P. HORSE OBSERVES SCHEDULE. 



Omaha. Neb. Dec. 17. — Old Jim. one of the Union 
Pacific's most faithful employees, has been slated for 
retirement on pension and the chances are that 
while Jim will not draw any money from the pension 
fund, he will live a life of ease during his remaining 
days. 

Jim is 21 years old and has been continuously in 
the employment of the Union Pacific during the lasc 
10 years. Jim, being a horse, does not have to con- 
form to some of the conditions required of men and 
women who go onto the company pension rolls. 

Jim's last mail delivery from the headquarters 
building to the Union Station week days is made at 
.5:45 o'clock in the afternoon. At least that is the 
time when he and his driver should leave the build- 
ing. Friday afternoon he was at his post of duty 
wiih his driver. The driver was in the building and 
was not in a hurry, but Jim was. He remained at 
the curb until 5:55 o'clock, when he seemed to realize 
that he had to ret started if he caught a 6:30 o'clock 
train to deliver his mail. Without waiting longer, in 
his teeth he picked up the leather strap to which was 
attached a 10-pound iron weight, turned around and 
down Dodge street, at a slow trot starting for the 
depot. Arriving there, he waited the usual length 
of time required to unload mail from the wagon, 
again picked up his weight and left for the stable. 



CANADA BEING DRAINED OF HORSES. 



"Canada is being drained of the foundation stock 
of its horses through the mistakes of the men buy- 
ing army animals for the Canadian Government," 
stated A. Yeager, of Simcoe, when asked by a Toronto 
Globe reporter the effect the shipping of so many 
horses from this country would have on the future of 
this important industry. "The number of animals is 
nothing," continued Mr. Yeager. "We would never 
miss twice as many, but the type will take years to 
replace. 

"We have a surplus of serviceable work horses in 
this country — horses well broken to harness, good 
workers and hardy both as to climate and disease. 
The animals range in weight from 1,100 to 1,400 
pounds. Nearly every farmer has onfe or two that he 
wishes to sell at a fair price. If all this stock was 
removed from the country the loss would only be felt 
temporarily, as most of the animals are geldings. 
Instead of the Remount Commission taking advan- 
tage of this market, however, they are completely 
ignoring it. 

"Buyers are looking for fat, young animals, mares, 
as well as geldings being taken. This class of horse 
is for the most part made up of mares, as the average 
farmer's breeding stock is young and in the pink of 
condition. Here is where the buyers are making a 
mistake. The young breeding stock that has taken 
this country years to build up is now being wasted. 
Because these animals have a finer appearance inex- 
perienced men are buying them in preference to 
workers. The ideal army horse is a strong, hardy 
animal, used to rough feed and hard work; an animal 
that will haul a gun into action and haul it away 
again. Will well-fed, five-year-old mares be able to 
do this work better than ihe ordinary farm blocks? 
They will not. Used to the very best treatment, 
barely broken to the bridle, they are taken out of 
the pastures or bright, airy stables and started for 
the battlefield. I say started, for it is long time 
before these animals reack the front. The horses 
are herded, 19 in a box car, and hauled to the stock 
yards. After being kept there for some time there 
is another ride in a drafty car to the training camp. 

"If the Commission wished to get their horses to 
the front with the least possible loss they would ship 
the animals direct to the training grounds. This 
would not only save the expense of loading and re- 
loading at the yards, but the horses would reach the 
grounds in less time without being exposed. 

"Their lack of previous experience in harness 
makes the breaking-in a difficult job, both for the 
men and the beasts. Sore shoulders and feet claim 
their victims. By the time the animals reach the 
battlefield a much larger percentage than the aver- 
age person is aware of has been lost. 

"Again the double loading and unloading of the 
horses costs money. Training young animals is no 
small item. Tho loss of time getting the stock ready 
for service alont; means a great deal of money. The 
greatest loss, however, will be that felt by the farm- 
ers of this country when the price of horses begins 
to rise and the quality begins to deteriorate, both 
due to the draining of foundation stock. All of these 
losses would bo borne cheerfully, if necessary, but 
when horsemen find that a great deal of them have 
no excuse, it is not surprising to find these men dis- 
satisfied. 

"How can we avoid these losses? Simply by put- 
ting horsemen in the place of the present buyers. 
The present method is not working satisfactorily. A 
typical case occurred here some time ago. A farmer 
came in with two horses: one was a nine or ten year 
old and well trained. The other was a four-year-old 
mare, fat and practically unbroken to harness. The 
buyer refused to give J125 for the gelding, but offered 
$200 for the mare. Why did he do this? Because 
the mare looked smoother than the worker. The 
gelding that was turned down on account of the lack 
of smoothness is today hauling an oil wagon, which 
is much heavier work than his share of hauling a 
gun would be. If the men under the Remount Com- 
mission realized what the horses would have to do 
they would choose workers, not show or breeding 
animals. They are not only getting less tor their 
money, but doing a vast injury to the whole country. 
Send the workers to the front, we can spare them, 
but leave the breeding stock at home. 

"The United States is selling thousands of animals 
tor military purposes, but that country is keeping 
its breeding stock, and because of this latter fad 
they are just one year ahead of us. If the present 
system of buying horses keeps up we will have to go 
to the States for breeding stock after the war. 

"Another point on which horsemen are dissatisfied 
is the lack of competition in Canada between buyers 
from the different nations looking for horses. If 
Canada does not want our surplus work horses, why 
not let Britain, France or Italy have a chance to buy 
them? Many farmers are not breeding this year, 
because they cannot find a market for their present 
stock." 

When asked the effect of the war on the breeding 
of pure-bred stock Mr. Yeager agreed with most of 
the other Canadian horsemen. "There will be a big 
demand for purebred heavy animals from now on," 
he said. "Great Britain, France and Belgium are 
being rapidly depleted of their horses. Even the best 
stock is being used up. Canada will find a ready 
market for her best horseflesh in those countries. 
The demand for good work horses will also be strong, 
but if the farmers keep on disposing of their mares 
for military purposes the filling of that market will 
have to be left to the United States." 



Saturday, January 1, 1916] 



THE BREEDER ANL SPORTSMAN 



9 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL 



CONDUCTED BY J. X, DeWITT 



a 

FROM RIO GRANDE DEL NORTE TO GUATE- 
MALA. 

Whrn the ca'^ual tourist speaks of a "trip to Mex- 
ico," he has no more idea of the size of the great 
republic of the South than a child has of astronomy; 
when he returns, having seen El Paso or Laredo or 
Nogales, having whirled through the plains and the 
mountains of the plateau to the ancient capital of 
the Montezumas. and then arrives home after two 
or three weeks in a Pullman, he thinks he has seen 
Mexico. So wrote Ramon .Jurado five years ago, 
before the revolutionary upheaval, but none the les.s 
interesting for all that. As a matter of fact, the 
said tourist has no more seen Mexico than a visitor 
to New York from across the Atlantic sees the great- 
est, best, most productive, most real part of the 
United States. 

From Tecolato, on the Rio Colorado, below Yuma, 
southward to Tapuchula on the Guatemala line, is 
more than 2.000 miles; from Matamoras, on the gulf 
coast, to Tia Juana, in lower California, is more than 
1,200 miles, and these distances represent the great- 
est length and breadth of the Estados Unidos de Mex- 
ico. 

I have rowed down the Rio Colorado to the Gulf 
of California. I have ridden on the Rio Grande, and. 
far to the south where the overarching jungle makes 
night of the brightest day. I have been paddled up 
the great Rio Usumacinta in an eight-oared war 
canoe, the Mexico-Guatemala line beneath her round- 
ed keel. 

Incidentally, I have seen great three-ton mantas 
en,gaged in war to the death with fifteen-foot man- 
eating sharks just off the little West Coast harbor 
of Manzanillo. and. months later, have heard the 
waves lapping above the dungeons of San Juan de 
Uloa, the fortress prison of Mexico at Vera Cruz, over 
on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. 

It has taken me the better part of a year to see 
this much of the great tropical empire, and even yet 
I know nothing of it. I have seen water led for 
scores of miles to irrigate millions of acres; I have 
seen 1,500 square miles of watershed drained into one 
set of turbines to provide light and power and heat 
for more than a dozen cities, and I know it is one 
of the lands of great industrial opportunity in this 
dawn of the twentieth century. 

I have shot deer seven thousand feet above the 
sea; killed ducks at five thousand feet, and met the 
jaguar and the alligator and the tapir, at sea level in 
jungles so dense that it is twilight at midday. I 
have ridden in an electric car, ten minutes from the 
heart of Mexico City, where dwell .500,000 people, 
past a lake so filled with ducks that I could see water 
only in scattered patches — and I know this is the 
greatest game preserve in the world. 

In Mexico there are no game laws. The sportsman 
hunts when and where he wishes, provided he can 
gain the consent of the keeper of the land. But the 
native man of means, who could afford his hammer- 
less and automatic and his powerboat and his aero- 
plane, seldom cares for these things. It remains for 
the foreigner to come into the republic and establish 
his hunting lodge and his game preserves. There 
are parts of Mexico which have never heard the 
crack of the rifle or the booin of the scattergun. Into 
some of these I have entered; into others I am going, 
and what I know of the great slopes of Mexico from 
Popocatepetl and Orizaba to the sea only spurs me on 
to greater hopes of what lies in the tangled caoba 
forests of Yucatan and Qiiintana Roo. 

I came into Mexico by way of the twin cities of 
Nogales. Arizona, and Nogales, Sonora. Neither one 
is worth mention, and the customs houses maintain 
what little population there is in either. But south 
of Nogales, Sonora, lies some of the finest grazing 
country in the world, and here, from the border 
down to the Yacjui river, is a vast game preserve, 
teeming with quail, wild pigeons, deer, mountain 
lions, foxes and coyotes. In the mountains which 
everywhere can be seen from the coast, there are 
probably a few hear, but Mexico as a whole is not 
a bear country. 

This is the country best adapted to the man who 
has been accustomed to the outdoor world of the 
United States and Canada, for the tropical jungles, 
wherein lurks the best big game shooting of the Nev>' 
World, are death-dealing to most men, unless they 
gradually acclimate themselves by coming slowly 
down the coast. 

From Nogales I wandered down to Guaymas, the 
port of Sonora on the Gulf of Lower California. 
When I landed there, a town of 9,000 people, saw the 
great bay and the gulf outside, I asked where I could 
rent a rod and reel and a launch. My answer was 
that all the fishing at Guaymas was done with hand- 
lines; that a rod and reel had never been used, 
though there were thousands of game fish outside, 
including the famed leaping tuna. More than thi.s, 
a steel seine has never been used by the market fish- 
ermen, while power-boats for fishing are all but un- 
known, there being but one vessel, a thirty-five 
footer, worthy of that name in the port. 



1 hunted and fished little in Sonora, however, and 
had my first real sport with the little sixteen along 
the banks of the Rio Yaciui down near the Sinaloa 
line, shooting wild pigeons. These are not the blue 
mountain pigeons of the California hills, but are a 
trillc smaller, gray in color, and look more like an 
exaggerated mourning dove, with the exception of 
the white crescent on the throat. 

Thousands of these birds breed in the thick jungle 
of the river and the result is that the sport in the 
fall months is excellent. They are strong, rapid 
flyers, pass in long flights over Cfutain feeding 
grounds and are a source of much pleasure to the 
few Americans in this part of the country. 

In Sinaloa, the State I next visited, one begins to 
enter the real jungle. Here, the railroad is merely 
a lane, 100 feet wide, walled in by jungle so dense 
that cattle cannot make their way through it untii 
the herders cut paths for them. The trees are most 
of them thirty feet or more in height, and so inter- 
laced with creepers and tough underbrush that it is 
an impossibility for the hunter to even enter it with- 
out the aid of mozos with machetes. Deer are abun- 
dant in this heavy jungle, small gray fellows, and 
they can be obtained only by waiting along the trails, 
for a full-grown buck, despite his antlers, will go at 
express train speed through the thickest part of the 
tangle. 

Sinaloa's great game animal is the javelin — pro- 
nounced "hahvayleen" — or wild hog. In the books 
you find him down as the peccary, but this pig is not 
the true peccary, though he is a fighter, runs in 
droves, like the piglets from father's barnyard. I 
had some good sport hunting these, and discovered, 
on the side, that I had entered the jaguar country 
as well. 

The jaguar is the great cat of Mexico. It combines 
the beauty of the lion, the strength of the tiger and 
the cunning of the leopard. Were a jaguar as large 
as a lion, the spotted American cat would whip the 
king of beasts in one round, and as it is, the jaguar 
is afraid of nothing that walks the earth, swims in 
the water, or flies in the air. He kills with equal 
impunity the alligator, the deer or the wild goose 
asleep on soiue pond, and if he once gets the taste 
of human blood, he will attack a full grown man just 
as quickly as he will a lamb or a calf. There are 
whole Indian villages in the jungles of Campeche and 
Chiapas and Yucatan, which have been entirely de- 
populated by the paws of one man-eating jaguar, for 
the persons he did not kill fled from their homes to 
build new grass huts in some less dangerous locality. 

From Sinaloa. which is a great, low-lying State, I 
passed on down to Mazatlan, thence across by sea 
to Manzanillo, and up to Colima, a little, white-walled 
city, nestling in the valley twenty miles from the 
volcano of the same name, the only active volcano 
in Mexico. 

Midway up the slope of this cone there is a beau- 
tiful, clear lake, which is filled with wild fowl of all 
kinds at certain seasons of the year, while around 
the foot of the mountain there is a heavy mat of 
jungle, which hides jaguars, mountain lions, wild 
hogs, deer and a few bear, not to mention the little 
spotted "windaroos," or ocelots, a sort of small leop- 
ard, not so large as the California red lynx. Unless 
by accident one runs across them in open country, it 
is almost impossible to get these animals without 
dogs, and a good hunting dog, in the shape of a 
hound or terrier, is unknown in the republic. 

But I began to get into the waterfowl country when 
I came up the mountains, through the great gorges 
spanned by the national railways, into the Lake Cha- 
pala country and its marshes. The duck shooting 
here has been aptly described by different writers, 
but I want to add a word about the jacksnipe of 
Mexico. Coming down from the north in annual 
migrations, these wary little birds have been shot at 
so little in the republic that they lose something of 
their shyness and offer better opportunities to the 
sportsman anxious for a big bag. The jacksnipe 
shooting on Lake (^hapala's marshes and the other 
lowlands of the plateau, is of the best in the world, 
and as this is one of my favorite game birds, I en- 
joyed myself in the fall months on these lakes. 

It is impossible, even in ten articles of the length 
of this, to detail my experiences on this remarkably 
interesting tour of Mexico which I have nearly com- 
pleted. To cover it day by day, even with the aid 
of the exhaustive diary I have kept is an impossi- 
bility, but there are some few things which I have 
learned regarding outdoor sports in Mexico which 
may be set down for the guidance of those who may 
seek new fields for rifle or shotgun or rod. 

The zones of wild life in Mexico are exceedingly 
well divided by altitude into three distinct classifi- 
cations. Coming into the country from the north 
there is the level or plain zone, which comprises 
much of the great States of Sonora, Chihuahua, Coa- 
huila and Nuevo Leon. This is a rolling country, 
rounding over from sea level on the east to sea level 
on the west, broken here and there with mountains, 
poorly wooded, poorly watered, but so well dowered 
with lush grasses at certain seasons of the year as to 



form the ideal deer country of Mexico. 

All the fishing worth while, and much of the shoot- 
ing, is contained in the sea-level zone. There are no 
trout, bass, salmon, or other game flsh in the rivers 
of Mexico, but in her coastal waters there are num- 
bers of the finest and gamiest of sea fishes, most of 
which have never been caught in sportsmanlike 
fashion. 

In the sea-level zone, south of the Territory of 
Tepic on the west and the State of Tamaulipas on 
the east, is the best alligator and jaguar shooting of 
the entire republic. The fishing in the hot parts of 
the coast, of course, is not so good as along the north- 
ern sea shore, but the Pacific, particularly, is full of 
game fishes at all places at all seasons of the year. 
Besides these, there is always the best of sport to 
be had with big fifteen and twenty-foot sharks, which 
make bathing all but impossible in the tropics. 

Some day I hope to hook up with one of these mon- 
sters with, say a sixteen-ounce rod and a twenty-one 
Cuttyhunk line. There will be something doing, I 
know; I am not even confident that I shall bring 
the monster up where I can put a rifle ball into him, 
but I also know that I shall have some good sport 
on the warm, sun-kissed sea of Mexico. 

The plains and the sea-coast zones both rise grad- 
ually to an altitude of 7,000 to 8,000 feet in the pla- 
teau zone, from which the cones of the highest moun- 
tains in Mexico pierce the very heavens. Mexico 
City, in which I am writing these lines, is 7,400 feet 
up in the air, while there are other towns at 8,000 
feet and over. Orizaba, the highest peak in North 
America, with the exception of Mt. McKinley, is 
18,162 feet high, according to the latest measure- 
ments, while Popocatepetl and Ixtaccihuatl, which 
overshadow this city, are above 16,000 feet. 

Naturally, hunting at such an altitude partakes 
rather of labor, but the deer and the wild pigeons 
and the occasional bear and mountain lion — called 
"puma" down here — more than make up for it. To 
give some idea of the number of deer killed by native 
hunters with pitfalls, running nooses, traps, spears, 
arrows and crude muzzie-loading guns, I may say that 
one hide dealer in Mexico City received 900 deer 
skins from the plateau region alone, during the month 
of December 1909, and it was by no means a record- 
breaking month. 

Leaving the City of Mexico again, after having 
seen the wondeiful pyramids of the sun and moon 
out at San Juan de Teotihuacan; after having viewed 
ten thousand peons crawling up the hill of Guadalupe 
to pay their devotions to the patron saint of all Mex- 
ico, I turned again to the jungle and wandered down 
through Morelos, Guerrero, and Oazaca, into Chiapas, 
and across this fever-stricken jungle-covered State 
to Tapachula, on the very line between Mexico and 
Guatemala. 

This entire country is scattered with tree-grown 
ruins of great cities, whose builders lived and loved 
and died before even the Aztecs followed the Toltecs 
and the Mayas into the Mexican plateau. There is 
material here for all the archeologists of the world 
for the next century, and even then, at the end of 
their combined labors, they will know less about the 
primitive dwellers in Mexico than they know now 
about the Pelopponesians or the ancient Egyptians. 
Mexico's remote past is buried and buried well, but 
the imperishable carvings on the walls of these ruined 
temples and once-palatial residences bear nuite wit- 
ness to a love of the chase of the deer and the jaguar, 
far in excess of the outdoor spirit of Mexico today. 

Shooting th(> game of this part of .Mexico can 
scarcely be called hunting, for the furred and feath- 
ered kindred of the wild know so little about man 
that they almost come and examine the rifle or the 
shotgun as it lies in one's hand. I remember partic- 
ularly, on a lonely trail in Chiapas, well up in the 
rough, timbered mountains, killing a deer late one 
afternoon. The echo of the shot had scarcely died 
away amid the peaks when a second buck walked out 
into the trail not fifty feet from where I stood. He 
stoi)ped stock still, looked at me with wliat seemed 
curiosity, and then deliberately walked down the lit- 
tle path toward me. I had no use for more m(>at, and 
his head was not exceptionally good, so I stepped to 
one side, giving him about three or four feet In 
which to pass. On he came, and actually walked 
past nu' at a distance in which I could have touched 
his gray back with the muzzle of the rifle. 

It s(>ems impossible that he should not have seen 
UK', and his hearing was certainly good, for wiien he 
had passed me by about twenty feet, I let out a yell 
sufficient to wake the sleeping kings in some of the 
ruins round about, and he leaped into the underbrush 
like a flash and was gone. 

It does not do, however, to trust a jaguar thus. He 
will come down the trail toward you, he has no fear 
whatever, but he will not pass you. Either you or 
he is going to die right there, and it is my principle 
when I know a ji guar sees me, to get him first. 

My mozzo and myself met a small "tiger," as the 
natives call the jaguar, on a trail in the isthmus of 
Tehuantepec about six o'clock one morning. It is 
necessary to rise early, travel late and rest in the 
shade from ten to two o'clock when passing through 
this country, and w(? had been on the road, afoot, 
another mozo bringing the pack animals a hundred 
yards or so down the trail. 

We came around a bend under an immense tree, 
and -walked riglU onto this jaguar, coming down the 
hill as we were going up. He stopped, raised his 
head, glared at us a minute and came right along. 
Running like a flash, a rabbit crossed the path just 
behind him. His acute ears lieard the patter of the 
rabbit's feet and he turned on all fours as on a pivot, 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 1, 1916 



but the rabbit was srone, and the cat resumed his 
leisurely walk, ttill in our direction. 

He was a small tiger, not more than five feet in 
length, and possibly two feet in height at the shoul- 
ders, but he had forgotten fear, and as he came his 
tail began to curl at the tip and to lash gently from 
side to side. At forty or fifty feet I concluded he had 
come close enough, and I put a .351 bullet between 
his eyes. He leaped straight up in the air, a haT)it 
which all jaguars have when shot, so far as my 
experience goes, at least, and came down on all 
fours. 

Examination alterwards proved tliat the soft-nosed 
ball had mushroomed and literally made a paste out 
of his brains, lodging against the back wall of the 
skull, but he fell into a crouch as he came down, 
seemed about to leap forward and then dropped over 
on his side, stone dead. 

The mozo declared that if I had not killed the 
jaguar, the cat would have come right on and at- 
tacked us, just as he would have leaped on a deer in 
the path. I have never seen a wild animal who 
would do this, and I believe that the man-smell and 
the general appearance of a human being, would turn 
the tiger aside, especially it the hunter shouted. Most 
animals are afraid of the human voice and I cannot 
believe the jaguar is an exception, though well-edu- 
cated Mexicans, familiar w ilh the ways of the spotted 
cat, tell me that it is afraid of nothing, and will 
attack anything that walks. 

Among the most interesting features of this trip 
was the finding here and there throughout the forest, 
on the faces of cliffs, under a clump of great trees, or 
on the summit of some mound-covered ruin, of a great 
stone idol, representing no one knows what, but 
totally different from the carvings at San Juan de 
Teotiiiuacan, Hilla, or Palenque, way down in Yu- 
catan. 

To my questions regarding these, the few natives 
merely shrugged their shoulders, with nods of igno- 
rance. It evidently had not occurred to them that 
anyone ever built these effigies, that here some prim- 
itive Phidias planned and carved and then became 
dust beneath the feet of his imperishable statues. 
Some day this w-onderful jungle-land will be opened 
to science, and then we may know something of an 
empire that was greater than either the Pharaohs or 
the Ptolemies and whose sculptors were as capable 
as the image-cutters of Athens or Kannak or Thebes. 

Everywhere I went, even in the Indian villages, I 
was treated as veil as the miserably poor creatures 
could treat a stranger who did not speak their tongue, 
for we must remember that the language of these 
tribes is the same that it was one thousand or ten 
thousand years ago, and most of them know very few- 
words of Spanish. Their homes are wattled grass, 
their clothing the cheapest cotton, often only a 
square cloth woven by hand from the native fibre 
plants, while their food is thin cakes of cornmeal 
called tortillas, beans, and fruit from the wild trees 
of the jungle. They are not hunters, and never will 
be; they are too lazy and too indifferent, but they 
are fairly good guides, though they have little of that 
unerring sense of direction when off the trail which 
is possessed in so marked a degree by the Indians of 
the northern United States. 

The consequence of their not being hunters, except 
in a small way, is that there is very little wild meat 
eaten in the southern part of Mexico except by the 
foreign(>rs who occupy lonely posts in the lumber, 
rubber, chicle, or mining trade. 

With one more experience. I must close this paper. 
I had the unique pleasure of riding up the Usumacinta 
river, in an eight-oared war canoe, an adventure 
seldom if ever before enjoyed by a w-hite man. I had 
made friends with the chief of a small tribe, who was 
going to visit the head man in another tribe, and in 
this way he carried me for more than one hundred 
miles along this winding river, from the border lands 
of Chiapas over into the middle of the peninsula of 
Yucatan. From there I found that it was easier to 
come back to the Pacific coast, take steamer for some 
northern port, Manzanillo in this instance, come 
across to Mexico City and then go down the east 
coast by steamer to Yucatan, than to go across the 
territory of the fierce and treacherous Mayas, into 
the capital of the famous peninsula. 

o 

GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



Things have gone to the devil generally on the Sui- 
sun marsh this year. Such doings and conditions 
have never been known before in the history of the 
marsh. It is just shot to pieces. There have not 
been ten sprig killed on the Suisun marsh proper in 
the last three weeks. They have left in a body — bag 
and baggage. Teal, mallard and canvasbacK ditto. 
Literally driven cut — scared to deatli. So states one 
of the "old timers." 

Last year one or two of the clubs commenced shoot- 
ing a little afternoons preceding regular shooting 
days, which are Wednesdays and Sundays. For years 
it has been an unwritten law on the Suisun marsh in 
regard to these two shooting days, and has been 
faithfully and honorably adhered to until recently. 

But this year real sportsmen went begging and the 
ganiehog took full possession of affairs on several 
of the preserves and utterly ruined the shooting, not 
only for themselves, but for the balance. Men who 
have shot for twenty-four years on the marsh were 
asking one another, "^\■here are the sprigs this 
year?" In former seasons at this time the very best 
shooting was to be had. But during all of this month 
— December — no birds were killed outside of a few 



spoonies or an occasional "hospital" duck tliat was 
too sick to get across the track out to the bay. 

It was reported and well known that on two of the 
clubs a hired man shoots on days between regular 
shooting days for the special benefit of whom it may 
concern. 

On three or four of the preserves the shooting 
commences about three o'clock every Tuesday and 
Saturday afternoon and is kept up until just before 
dark. Any old hunter will tell you that such a state 
of affairs would drive the birds away from the marsh 
in a body. Sprig are especially migratory birds. A 
band of canvasback or teal or spoonbills or widgeon 
will stick to a section until the big rains finally drive 
them away. But sprig are capricious and wary and 
at the slightest undue infiuence they will leave in a 
body. They are here today and there tomorrow. And 
the truth of all this has at last been forced on the 
members of the various preserve clubs. Several of 
them have already taken their kits down for the win- 
ter. "No use going up there any more," they said; 
"there are no birds." 

And even among those who have been the most 
persistent in this injudicious slaughter the word is 
passed that it is advisable to stop the practice. Al- 
most everyone interested, in general conversation is 
talking about the necessity of forming an association 
for next year to confine the shooting to two days a 
w^eek, the same as before. All now see the folly of 
trying to overdo a good thing. 

Sunday. December 19, four men killed ninety-five 
birds on an island down at the bay shore, including 
fifty sprig and twenty-five canvasback. But on the 
Suisun marsh proper there were hardly fifty birds 
killed among twenty men, and the birds all spoonies 
at that. The birds have been driven off the marsh 
by undue shooting. Another condition is that it 
would be advisable to bar all keepers and hired men 
from shooting for the members next year. Certainly 
anything so unsportsmanlike as that should meet 
with the unanimous condenmation of all sportsmen. 

That undue eagerness and enthusiasm is what 
really carried most of these sinners out of the regu- 
lar path of sportsmanship, rather than any premedi- 
tated plan either to get more ducks than the law 
allows or to injure their fellow sportsmen, is believed 
by the older Suisun frequenters. But now it is 
clearly evident that too much shooting is impractic- 
able, all concerned would be willing to embrace the 
first opportunity to control matters on an association 
basis. But it is impossible to be both a sportsman and 
a gamehog — a man must decide to be either one or 
the other. 

Not for many years have local duck-hunting sports- 
men observed such a disappointing scarcity of wild 
fow-1 in the bay counties hunting districts. What in 
past seasons has been generally the most enjoyable 
period for the trigger-pullers has turned out, for 
about four w-eeks now, an exasperating dearth of 
ducks at many favorite shooting resorts. 

Along the east San Pablo shores, for instance, in 
past seasons canvasbacks and bluebills have been 
most plentiful at this time of the month, and splendid 
shooting has been the vogue all along the shores from 
Berkeley up to Rodeo. Northern birds were in evi- 
dence by the thousands. Not this year, however. Just 
where the northern flight is, and why the birds are 
not in the upper bay, is a puzzle that experienced 
bay gunners cannot answer. 

It is true that there is quite a showing of these 
birds in San Pablo bay, but they are evidently wised 
up to shore-line dangers and do not "work in" during 
the daytime. As an instance of webfooted wariness, 
one well-known hunter had over 100 decoys out, near 
his blind off Sobrante, one Sunday; four ducks was 
his reward for an all-day vigil in the blind. In that 
section, last December, "can" limits were frequently 
shot by 10 a. m., sometimes earlier. 

Alameda marsh duck ponds, most of them, are also 
on the waiting list for the expected feathered bands. 
Fair shooting was had Sunday a fortnight ago by 
Fred Herron and Ted Butler on the Hesse ponds, 
near Alvarado. Lou Schroeder's trip to the nearby 
Mudhen Club pond was rewarded with a small string 
of birds, mostly spoonbills. 

Many of the Alameda marsh gunners have had 
ample time to forage over adjoining pasture tracts 
for mushrooms. The south bay has been covered with 
lafts of wild ducks recently. The bombardment they 
were subjected to since the opening days has evi- 
dently schooled the birds to slip into the baited 
ponds and other feeding places at night and rest on 
the bay waters during the daytime. Across the bay, 
along the Redwood City and San Mateo shores, bay 
blind gunners have had fairly good shooting the past 
ten days. 

The Petaluma and Sonoma marshes as well as the 
Black Point bay shores have offered poor shooting 
recently. Farther north, however, in the Napa 
marshes, near the bay shore, better sport has been 
available. 

• * » 

Where have the Suisun sprig gone? 

Most probably up to the Butte creek overflow sec- 
tion—and in the rice stubble fields of that district. 
.Millions of ducks and geese are in that section. 

The recent rains have scattered the birds pretty 
well, and the shooting on the preserves has not been 
overly good recently. That is where the wild fowl 
are and also all of the northern migrants that have 
come down, and it is more than probable the birds 
will stay there as long as the good feed holds out. 
There Is nothing particularly tempting in the feed 



line between the upper Sacramento valley country 
and the Imperial valley grain fields or the Colorado 
delta. 

Down around Los Banos and Dos Palos, in the San 
Joaquin valley, the recent rains have formed many 
ponds. The reports recently are that teal and sprig 
have been fairly numerous. 

* * * 

While the quail season has recently been better 
than it has been at any time this year, the sports- 
men were bemoaning the fact that they had to sus- 
pend operations with the passing of 1915. 

The quail season has not been favorable this year 
for the reason that the first part of the period was 
too dry. making it impossible to use dogs with any 
degree of success. The birds were numerous enough, 
but they were hard to bag until after the rains set 
in, since which time the sportsmen have been more 
successful in the pursuit of them. 

The number of birds killed this season has been 
far below the usual number, all of which augurs well 
for a good season next year with the proper weather 
conditions, as there will be a large crop of breeding 
stock left. 

* * • 

Cottonttail rabbits have been more plentiful in 
California this jear than ever before, which is ac- 
counted for by the protection given them by the 
State laws. Hunters v,'ho have been seeking these 
little animals as a rule return with the limit, and 
the sport is .good in almost any section, except where 
floods occurred last year. While the cottontails are 
plentiful everywhere in the State, they are more 
numerous in the sections where they can get green 
feed all the time. 

Many prefer cottontail to other wild game for eat- 
ing purposes, they being considered a great delicacy. 
The season closed yesterday, after which time they 
can not be molested until October 15, 1916. 

* * * 

Steelhead angling in the coast streams of district 
No. 2 has not, with the exception of Paper Mill creek, 
offered anything like the good sport of past seasons. 
Russian river advices state that the river is clearing 
and running down and the prospect for good fishing 
in the near future is excellent. Near Duncan's Mills 
a number of trout have been caught the past week. 

o 

THE A. K. C. REGISTRATION RULE. 



Since the American Kennel Club sent out notice 
that only dogs, the sire and dam of which both are 
registered in the A. K. C. stud book, would be eligi- 
ble to registration after January 1, 1916, a great 
many letters have been received asking the rules 
governing registration, address of the A. K. C. and 
whether it w^as true that no dog born after January 
1 would be eligible to registration unless proper 
notice was mailed to Kennel Club by this date. The 
rules imder which a dog may be registered in the 
American Kennel Club are: 

1. American bred dogs are only eligible by virtue 
of the previous registration of both sire and dam in 
the American Kennel Club stud book. 

2. Foreign bred dogs are only eligible if their 
pedigree can be established for three full generations 
of both sire and dam. 

3. Any imported dog registered in the English 
stud book must retain its English registration name 
followed by (Eng.) when applying for registration 
in the American Kennel Club stud book. 

4. The breeder of a dog is the person either own- 
ing or leasing the bitch at the time of service. 

5. No change in the registered name of a dog will 
be permitted after December 31 of the year of regis- 
tering. 

6. In changing ow-nership the original stud book 
number will be retained, and if re-registered the dog 
will be entered in a subsequent volume of the stud 
book the same as an original registration. 

T. In applying for change of name or ownership 
the original registry receipt properly indorsed must 
be returned. 

8. No kennel name will be recognized in connec- 
tion with the ow-nership or breeding of a dog unless 
such kennel name has been previously registered 
with the American Kennel Club and approved by the 
stud book committee. 

All dogs whelped prior to January 1 do not have 
to be registered, but it is necessary that their sire 
and dam both be registered. The address of the 
Kennel Club is 1 Liberty street. New York. 

o 

Underground Elk Dentistry. — A curious fact was 
developed in the recent round-up of elk at Button- 
willow, in Kern county, none other than that the 
teeth or tusks of the bull elk were uniformly missing. 
These teeth, as is well know-n, are prized as charms 
by members of the Order of Elks and therefore have 
a commercial value. The teeth are not used or need- 
ed for mastication by the animals and it is said that 
at a previous round-up many elk were roped and the 
teeth extracted. Also, the story goes, that vaqueros 
have frequently lassoed the animals and pulled the 
teeth. In any event, of some fifty bull elks exam- 
ined, none had the usual teeth and presumably many 
a member of the B. P. O. E. is wearing an elk tooth 
charm at the expense of the antlered herd at Button- 
willow. 



Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Saturday, January 1, 1916] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



WHEN THE ALL-AMERICAN TEAM WENT 
A-SHOOTING ACROSS THE SEA. 



[By Billy Bowlegs.] 

In 1901 an American trap team journeyed to Ens- 
land and wised the Britons to several angles of the 
blooie game they wot not of. The story of that 
classy gang of gunpointers may prove interesting 
to readers of the Breeder and Sportsman, so here's 
where it flickers. 

Paul North of Cleveland, Ohio, is the man who 
really discovered that the British were ripe and a 
great deal of the American team's success can be 
blamed on him. The details were arranged by Tom 
Marshall, team captain for the Americans, and by 
Captain Butts for our cousins overseas. Tlie big 
noise happened in happy .June time, on the ^Middlesex 
Gun Club's grounds in dear old Lunnun town. In giv- 
ing the American team's personnel each gunman's 
Indian handle also is hitched on. Headed by Chief 
Long Talk Tom Marshall. Keithsburg, 111., the others 
were: Heap Talk Fred Gilbert. Spirit Lake, la.: 
Dago Charlie Budd, Des Moines, la.: Kinnikinic Bill 
Crosby, O'Fallon. 111.: Bold Ea.gle Rollo Heikes, Day- 
ton, O.; Bullhead Jack Fanning, New York: Brook 
Trout Jim Elliott, Kansas City; High Kick Dick Mer- 
rill, Milwaukee, and Buffalo Hump Frank Parmelee, 
Omaha. Substitutes were Ernie Tripp, of Indianap- 
olis, and Ed Banks, of New York. 

Others who made the journey were: Emil Werk 
and daughter, of Cincinnati: Paul North and wife, 
Cleveland; Frank Harrison, Jersey City; Roy Wood- 
ward and Harry Getchell, of Brockton, Mass. 

The men shot at 100 birds each, 18 yards' rise, un- 
known angles. There were five trap houses and 
fifteen traps, three in each pit. The match was best 
three in five for a purse of $10,000. The British wei'e 
allowed the use of both barrels, the Yanks being 
limited to one. 

Well, all the details were finally arranged and came 
a time when the referee started the chosen twenty on 
their historical test of skill. Tom Marshall led off, 
drew a screaming left angle and snuffed the clay 
close up in his usual brilliant style, giving a hint of 
what was coming from that gang of fast pointin,g, 
hard shooting in\aders. And come it did, so speedy 
and true that the Yankees won the first fest by a 
margin of 63 kills. The second race was such an 
easiness — Uncle's men 81 to the good. 

But the third and last foray of this fruit gathering 
expedition was "petty" larceny, pure and simple. 
Honestly, it was a crime. The Jay Bulls never had 
a look-in — they couldn't even get started to peek, so 
fast was the pace — and the final try, the mix that 
meant "Come to me. mazuma," showed the childers 
of Sammy IT by 93 majority. Of course, there was 
heap much happy gladhand stuff at the finish, for 
the Brits were game losers. In fact, they figured the 
match had been lost to their own people, after all, so 
why grouch or feel sad? 

By this time the tight little isles were hep that 
your Uncle's chosen band was a tough outfit, but the 
canny Scots were from Mizzou, so the team trekked 
to Glasgow and performed the pleasing operation of 
separating the Highlanders from a wad. It was 
awfully easy, for the bur-r- boys refused any handi- 
cap, but the foxy Scotch put up only .500 washers 
Then came an individual race between a Kilty named 
Faulds and the Hon. "T. Bill" Crosby, who hails from 
the state that owns Auroaria, Peroaria and Chicawgo 
This affair was a little surprise party to "T. Willie.' 
The match was at 200 birds each, 100 being thrown 
from a tower, and "Kinnikinic" was hep to that game 
about as much as a jaybird to Delsarte. But the old 
Illinois trapshark made good and gathered the coin. 
Tight squeak, though, for William won by only three 
birds. 

Followed then a race by tlje Americans for a splen- 
did cup given by the British, to determine who was 
champion of the invaders. It was a swell scramble 
and wound up with Charlie Budd and Fred Gilbert 
tied, both sons ol Hawkeyeland. In the shoot-off the 
Spirit Lake wizard won a close rcice by a slender 
margin. 

Paul North was so tickled over the way th<> British 
donated that he piloted the boys to London and gave 
them a big blowout at Hotel Cecil, a swagger indi- 
gestion breedery. This eats was full brother to 
another feed at the Royal Cafe, given by the English- 
men. Then one day the Americans hired a couple 
of vans to haul their money in, rambled down to the 
ocean, bought a ship and came home. 

o 

AT THE TRAPS. 



Montana Traps — Nine of the members of the Deer 
Lodge Gun Club held a shoot at the local fair grounds 
December 12. On account of the cold weather, no 
out-of-town visitors were present, so no medals were 
contested for. There were five events, two of lf> 
birds each, one of 20, one of 25, and one of 12 pairs. 
The scores were as follows: 



Events — 


15 


15 


20 


25 


12 


Lee M'illiams 


15 


10 


17 




20 


Tippett 


12 


12 


19 


20 


20 


Larabie 


9 


12 


18 


17 


17 


McMullen 


12 


11 


17 


21 






13 


10 








Bennett 


11 


12 


17 


20 






14 


15 


17 


22 


18 


Valiton 


13 


12 


17 




18 


C. Bielenberg 




12 


16 







Orange Belt Trap Shoot. — Harry Clino won a leg 
on the ^\■ilshirc tropliy last Sunday morning, which 
was contested for at 50 tar.gets at the traps of the 
Vernon Gun Club, by breaking 47 out of the half- 
century. Cline was shooting the eyes and ears oui 
of the targets and didn't flinch once during his per- 
formance. He declared that one of the birds he 
missed was a cast-iron on(> and that he discovered his 
firin.s pin was made of rubber wlien he missed the 
other two. Cline has b(-on shooting regularly at the 
Vernon Club since the tropliy has been put up, but 
this is his first leg on the prize. Three wins and 
the trophy becomes his for keeps. Two more scores 
like he made last Sunday and he will have little 
difficulty in copping the cup. 

-Altliough it was the last Sunday in which local 
shooters could hunt quail, twenty-four shooters fav- 
ored the Vernon Club with their attendance and 
competed in both practice and the trophy shoot. 

Stanton Bruner was high gun in the practice shoot 
with 91 dead birds out of 100 shot at. The final 
shoot of the year on the blackbird watch fobs was 
also ad(led in the trophy shoot, the .scores on the 
prize counting on the fobs. 

Cline won a fob in class C, Stanton Bruner in class 
B, Dr. Packard and Fiank Melius tied for a fob in 
class A and Manderville won in class D. 

Second high gun in the trophy contest ended in a 
three-cornered tie. Frank Melius, "Doc" Packard and 
Stanton Bruner each broke 46 out of the 50. The 
scores are as follows: 



Wilshire trophy shoot of 50 targets, and practice 
shooting — 

Handicap. Practice. 



Name. 


Yds. 


Birds 


Bke. 


Birds 


Bke. 


C. B. Monaghan . . 


18 


50 


44 


50 


47 


William Pugh . . . 


. 18 


50 


44 


25 


21 


S. A. Bruner 


18 


50 


46 


100 


94 


Harry Cline 


17 


50 


47 


75 


62 


Manderville 


16 


50 


45 


75 


60 


James Funk 


16 






50 


33 


C. White 


16 


50 


45 


100 


82 


Paul Halcomb . . . 


. 16 


50 


36 


75 


60 


A. W. Brimer .... 


16 


50 


43 


25 


21 


J. P. Dierdoff 


18 


50 


45 


25 


22 


O. Evans 


18 


50 


42 








18 


50 


37 


25 


19 


H. D. Blanchard. . 


. 18 


50 


45 


50 


44 


Roy Capp 


. 16 






25 


17 


Lloyd Garrison . . 


. 18 


50 


37 


25 


18 


C. E. Groat 


18 


50 


43 


25 


20 


Mrs. C. B. Groat. . 


. 16 


50 


43 


25 


21 


Dr. Packard 


19 


50 


46 






T. P. Smith 


IS 


50 


45 


25 


44 


Frank Melius 


19 


50 


46 


25 


24 


M. A. Rees 


. 16 


50 


32 


25 


32 


F. H. Nichols 


16 


50 


38 






George Melford . . 


17 


50 

: * 


39 


25 


21 



Registered Tournaments For 1916. — The Interstate 
Association, through Secretary E. Reed Shaner, re- 
quests us to: "Please state in Breeder and Sports- 
man, for the benefit of gun clubs that intend applying 
for Registered Tournaments, that application blanks 
and the literature explaining our 1916 policy will be 
])ut into the mails about the tenth of January." 

o 

NATIONAL RIFLE ASSOCIATION NOTES. 



At the present time there is an unprecedented 
revival on throughout the country in rifle shooting, 
brought about by the enactment of a law by Congress 
last year authorizing the free issue of rifles and am- 
munition to rifle clubs organized by civilians. Under 
this act ten citizens in any 'locality can organize 
themselves into a government rifle club and adopt 
by-laws approved by the Secretary of War. The club 
then affiliates with the National Rifle Association of 
America and is issued by the War Department one 
new Krag rille for every five members of the club 
and 120 rounds of ammunition to each member annu- 
ally for use on the rifle range. The work of organiz- 
ing the clubs, looking after them, issuing decorations 
and medals, and classifying their work, was put in 
the hands of the National Rifle Association of Amer- 
ica by the War Department and this organization, 
which for forty-two years has been working to make 
rifle shooting a popular sport in this country, has 
suddenly sprung into prominence througli its co- 
operation with till! government by the organization of 
these clubs. Within the last year the association 
reports that it has completed the organization of 
over 400 clubs, not only in the United States proper 
but in Porto Rico, Canal Zone, Alaska and Hawaii. 
Over a million and a half rounds of ammunition has 
been issued to thes(! clubs during the year and about 
3,000 rifles. The possibilities of this movein(>nt are 
unlimited and depend only ui)on the securing of 
range facilities where such clubs can carry on their 
work. With this object in view Congress will be 
asked at this session to provide for a Conmiission to 
investigate the entire subj(H't of range construction 
from a national defense standpoint, survey the entire 
country and recommend a permanent national policy 
of range const luction and localities where such 
range construction and locialities wliere such ranges 
should be constructed. In addition the National Rifle 
.Association will ask for a national charter and an 
annual appropriation of $25,000 from Congress to 
assist it in carrying on the work as it should be done. 
Although the Association has a perfect organization 
with .secretaries and branches in every Stale there is 
no way in which it can reimburse these secretaries 



for their traveling expenses and lime, and it is hardly 
to be expect(-d that th(>se men, who are active and 
prominent in business, sliould devote their time and 
money to this work without reimbursement. 

The National Board for Promotion of Rifle Practice 
has also been very badly handicapped for tlie lack of 
funds to carry out its plans for the broadening of the 
rifle movement in a proper national manner, and to 
meet this the Secretary of War will ask that the 
amount of mon(\v now available for the Board, which 
is only $10,000, be increased to $50,000 and that this 
money be made available for the p\irchase of target 
supplies for issue to rifle clubs and to pay markers 
on Stale ranges where targets are put at the disposal 
of civilian clubs, as under the present regulations 
the Stale military departments can not pay the mark- 
er's salary except when working for the National 
Guardsmen. So. taking everything into considera- 
tion, the future for rifle shooting in this country looks 
viM'y bright and if Congress gives the help and addi- 
tional encouragement to the clubs it will only be a 
very short while before we will have half a million 
qualified military marksmen in this country, which 
will be a very valuable asset in any scheme of pre- 
paring volunteers in this country for military service. 

One very satisfactory feature of the rifle club work 
is the way that the whole question has been ap- 
proached by big employers. Many of the largest cor- 
porations of lh'> country have endorsed the plan of 
organizing Government rifle clubs among their em- 
ployees and in some cases have assisted financially 
in furnishing ranges for clubs. These corporations 
take the stand that it is beneficial all around to have 
their men spend their time on the rifle range Satur- 
day afternoons and Sundays where they get the ben- 
efit of the outdoor life and fresh air, giving good 
health which is so conducive to efficiency of em- 
ployees and which in many cases take the men away 
from saloons, pool rooms and like resorts. Successful 
clubs are maintained at many plants and the inter- 
est in these clubs seems to be on the increase, their 
membership growing larger constantly and larger 
turnouts reported at the ranges. 

Another prolific source for the organization of gov- 
ernment rifle clubs is the semi-military fraternal 
organizations. The order of Maccabees have aboul 
completed the organization of over sixty clubs among 
their dift'erenl branches and will begin active work 
on the ranges after the first of the year. The Order 
of Woodmen also have several successful clubs. 

One of the most prominent features of the work of 
the National Rifle Association is the league matches 
which it runs off on gallery ranges during the winter, 
the object b^-ing to keep the men interested in shoot- 
ing as well as keeping them in constant training so 
that they will be in belter shape for their outdoor 
work during the spring and summer. Several of 
these league matches are Wav Department matches 
but are held under the management of the National 
Rifle Association. In the Interclub match, which is a 
War Department competition, 72 clubs that cover 
the entire United States have entered teams in the 
competition. This will make six leagues of 12 clubs 
each lettered from Class A to Class F inclusive. 
The first tliree classes are arranged according to the 
order in which these clubs finished in the 1915 com- 
petition and all the other classes are composed of 
new clubs, showing the great increase in this small- 
bore work. Last year only 36 clubs entered the 
matches so that there are double the number this 
year. It is expected the matches will begin the week 
ending December 25 and they will last for 11 weeks. 
The winning team in each class will receive medals, 
but any club in any of the classes can win the 
national trophy if they make the highest grand aggre- 
gate in all the matches. Each club will be repre- 
sented bv a team of ten competitors, the five highest 
scores to count for the team's weekly record. Each 
man will fire 20 shots prone at 75 feet using .22 cali- 
ber rifles with sights other than tel(>scopic anywhere 
on the rifle. The target used has a half-inch counting 
bull with concentric rings one-quarter inch apart, the 
siuhling bull being 2 inches in diameter. There is 
also a large entry for the intercollegiate league 
matches. These will begin the week ending January 
15 and will also last for 11 weeks. The inter high- 
school matches and the military school matches will 
begin the same time. Efforts are being made to ,s;el 
out the targets for the first match in the school and 
college matches so that the teams can shoot lh(>ir 
first match before the Christmas holidays. In these 
matches the old target with one and one-half inch 
sighting bull will be gone back to. The shooting as 
formeriy will all be done at 50 feet, using the .22 cal- 
iber rifle and short cartridges. 

o 

Rem-UMC Notes. 

Edgar A. Miller, prominent trap shot of St. Louis, 
using a Remington pump gun won the 1915 Handicap 
Championship of the Missouri Athletic Association 
with an average of .9760, scoring 244 out of a pos- 
sible 250. 

C. II. Newcomb. the Penn State champion, is keep- 
ing up his good work in and about Philadelphia. 
Shooting Nitro Club shells, he tied for first place with 
F. S. Cantrell at a Holmsburg Jet., Pa., shoot re- 
cently, breaking 93 of his 100 targets. 

The newly organized Lewisville (Ind.) Gun Club 
held an interesting shoot at which the three high 
guns, all shooting Nitro Club shells, were very evenly 
matched, F. Iluber winning with a score of 46x50, 
while John Logan and C. Huber captured second and 
third places respectively, scoring 45x50 and 43x50. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 1, 1916 



■•'3 

THE FARM ! 

1 j 

PIGEONS. 



We read much of the profit to be 
derived from raising pigeons for 
squabs, of the money to be made from 
the "slaughter of the innocents," but 
little as to their desirability as pets. 
Many a boy with his single pair or his 
small loft of fantails, Homers, Tum- 
blers, Pouters or other varieties, will 
vouch for the fact that this is all 
wrong, that more solid enjoyment and 
interest can be extracted from his 
feathered pets than from a houseful 
of inanimate toys. Many a brain- 
weary professional man fiids needed 
relaxation, and life takes on a more 
roseate hue, in the company of his 
cooing and strutting friends. The loft 
may be a soap-box in the corner of 
some outbuilding, and shelter but a 
single pair of pigeons, or it may be 
more pretentious, and house a larger 
flock in greater variety. In any event, 
the pleasure derived is real, helpful, 
improving, and the cost small. A sin- 
gJemated pair will give a start, and a 
small box in some out-of-the-way cor- 
ner, with two nests, will serve them 
for a home. Many a city boy, with 
little or no ground space, has his pig- 
r-on coop on the roof of the house, and 
ho is elevated in more senses than one 
by his associations there. 

Aside from any utilitarian qualities 
they may possess, this family of birds 
is well worthy of the consideration of 
all country dwellers. Most people like 
10 have about them some animals 
which are responsive to kind treat- 
ment. Most varieties of pigeons re- 
spond readily to kind attention, and 
many of them become very tame. The 
care and breeding of pigeons is also 
an excellent method of cultivating the 
faculty of close observation and care- 
ful attention to minute details, and is 
thus to be commended to any one, 
young or old. 

In most of our cities large flocks of 
pigeons may be found building their 
nests and raising their young In the 



steeples of churches, towers of public 
buildings, and various other secure re- 
treats. Belonging to no man, they 
seek their food in the streets, about 
warehouses, and wherever scattered 
grain may be found. I have seen them 
about ferry houses, and even on the 
f( rry boats, walking unconcernedly 
about almost under the feet of the 
hurrying passengers. I have known 
clerks in some of the business offices 
to buy pigeon feed to scatter in the 
courts and on the window ledges lo 
lure these aerial wayfarers where they 
could be observed, and thus enliven 
the monotony of the caged workers. 
And a hardened individual he must be 
who would harm one of these trusting 
innocents! 

Why, then, should not the occupants 
of a country place enjoy the compan- 
ionship of such easily raised and 
cheaply kept feathered pets? A point 
in their favor is that, if desired, they 
may be made to pay their way. The 
young of about all varieties make ex- 
cellent squabs — if one have the heart 
to kill them. If not, and if good birds 
be procured for foundation stock, a 
fair income may be secured from the 
sale of breeders. I have in mind one 
boy, who started only a few years ago 
by keeping a few pigeons as pets, who 
has won prizes at some of our best 
shows, and now has a demand for 
bird beyond his ability to supply, at 
prices that most of us would consider 
high. His pets have much more than 
paid their way. 

Pigeons form a family distinct from 
true poultry. The anatomical struc- 
ture is entirely different. The male 
and female both sit on the nest, al- 
though, true to tradition, the male does 
only about one-fourth of the day's 
work. But the most singular distinc- 
tion is the peculiar method by which 
the young are fed. The latter, unlike 
chickens, are helpless when hatched, 
and remain so until near maturity. 
They are fed in the nest by the parent 
birds, with what has sometimes been 
called "pigeon's milk," a curdy secre- 
tion produced in the crops of the par- 
ent birds only at hatching time, which 
is disgorged into the beaks of the 
ycung. After about three days, a little 
of the ordinary food of the' pigeons is 
mingled with it, after which the curdy 
secretion decreases for about a week 



or ten days, when it ceases entirely. 

The young reach full size in about 
a month or a little more, so that the 
stock may be increased very rapidly, 
as the female usually lays two more 
eggs before the young are out of the 
nest. Some varieties hatch and raise 
as many as six or eight pairs each 
year, and occasionally we hear of some 
that exceed this. 

Our domestic pigeons are descend- 
ants of the Rock Dove, or Blue Rock 
Dove. It is a curious fact that none 
of the other species of doves is capa- 
ble of domestication. The number cf 
existing varieties into which pigeons 
have become divided is bewildering 
to the novice. The requirements for 
some of the varieties, according to 
show standards, hinge upon so slight 
a matter as a definite number of white 
feathers in a wing. 

Most, if not all, of the varieties make 
good pets if properly handled. . Prob- 
ably the best guide in selecting the 
variety to be kept would be the per- 
sonal preference of the one most in- 
terested. 

The best known variety of pigeon is 
probably the Homer. Its distinguish- 
ing characteristic is its remarkable 
power of flight, and its attachment to 
its home. The birds of this variety 
are strongly built, yet trim and neat 
and pleasing to the eye. This is the 
variety most largely used for squab 
breeding, both pure-bred and crossed 
with Runts and other varieties, and 
hence are excellent for the amateur 
who wishes to make his pets pay their 
way by sacrificing them to market de- 
mands. 

There are several different colors of 
Fantails, the white being the most 
popular. The Fantails are bred for a 
great spread of tail, which is carried 
upright, or rather forward, like a fan. 
The back is short, breast full, neck 
long and slender, and head carried up- 
right, meeting the tail. 

The Pouter has long, feathered legs, 
a long but slender body, an erect car- 
nage, and has the power of filling the 
crop with air to an enormous extent, 
forming an almost perfect globe. This 
gives it a very odd appearance, and 
many fancy this variety on this ac- 
count. There are several colors. A 
young Pigy Pouter, left an orphan, and 
given to a lady who fed it and cared 
for it, became so tame that it would 
ride on her shoulder all over the house 
and garden. If she were in a room 
filled with people, and gave a peculiar 
call, the bird would seek her out at 
once, and manifest unmistakable af- 
fection. 

One old faicier, who has kept a large 
number of varieties, declares that he 
considers the Short-faced Tumblers 
the best for pets, though, owing to 
their peculiar method of flight, they 
are often the victims of hawks and 
crows. The Tumbler is a small bird, 
with a peculiar carriage, globular head 
and diminutive beak. Its singular 
method of turning somersaults, or 
tumbling, in its flight, gives the name. 
Some veiT highly bred specimens have 
this quality to such an extent as to 
he almost incapable of flight. Their 
peculiar antics are very amusins:. Of 
the same class are the Parlor Turn 
biers, still less capable of flight, and 
much more given to tumbling or roll- 
ing. 

Those mentioned are probably the 
leading varieties kept for pets, though 
there are several other candidates, 
each with its peculiar recommenda- 
tions. Jacobins, Turbits, Owls, Dra- 
goons, Swallows and Magpies are a 
tew of the other varieties to be noted. 
The only way to settle as to the vari- 
ety to be kept for pleasure is to study 
the different kinds, select the one 
which, considered all around, is pleas- 
ing. It may be necessary to breed and 
handle several kinds before a choice 
i:-- finally made. But there cannot fail 
to be much pleasure derived, as well 
as knowledge acquired, in the opera- 
tion. 

In preparing quarters for any breed 
of pigeons, bear in mind that each 
pair requires two nests, for the reason 
that the female lays her second hatch- 
ing of eggs and begins to set on them 
before the first pair of young are large 
enough to leave the nest. And be 
sure to provide plenty of nesting ma- 
terial if you keep them confined. Pine 
needles are excellent foi this pur- 
pose. — Rural World. 



Classified Advertising | 

FOR SALE. 



HKST POLICY 42378, oiif of the best 
bi i;cl horses in the world. Handsome bay 
hcr.se. sniall star in forehead, left hind 
pa.stern and loft fore heel white. Has size, 
heavy boned, stylish, pure gaited trotter, 
.--( und, and a splendid individual in every 
respect. Best Policy is by Allerton .S128. 
dam Kxine 2:18Vi by Expedition, next 
dam Euxine by Axtell. next dam Russia 
hv Harold 413, next dam Miss Russell, 
dam of Maud S., etc. Best Policy has 
trctted a mile on the Hanford half mile 
track in 2:12. He is ten years old and 
with little training would make a good 
Knme race horse, and ninety percent of 
his colts .are trotters. He wiU be sold at 
a great .sacrifice. For price and further 
particulars address 

BREEDER & SPORTSMAN, 
P. O. Box 447. San Francisco, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

The five-year-old pacer The Fool, trial 
this sea.son with limited opportunity in 
2:11. halves in 1:03, quarters in 30 sec- 
onds. A pleasure to drive this fellow and 
an amateur will drive him in better than 
ten in the matinees next sea.son. 

Also Oro Bond, three-year-old. But for 
a slight injury late in the season would 
have been heard from in the stakes this 
year. He is now sound and ready for 
.some one to point for the races next year. 
AVill make a sure enough racehorse. These 
two priced to .sell. 

Breeding and price on application. 

DR. I. L. TUCKER, 

Oroville, Cal. 



, Dividend Notice 

THE GERIVIAN SAVINGS AND LOAN 
SOCIETY 
(The German Bank) 
526 California St. 
MISSION BRANCH, corner Mission and 
21.st St.s. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, cor- 
ner Clement St. and 7th Ave. 
HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, corner 
lUiight and Belvedere Sts. 
Knr the half year ending December 31, 
11115, a dividend has been declared at the 
rate of four (4) per cent per annum on 
all deposits, payable on and after Monday, 
.latiuary 5, 1916. Dividends not called for 
are added to the deposit account and 
earn dividend.s from January 1, 1916. 

GEORGE TOURNEY, Manager. 



FOR SALE. 



New " Ideal Mc.Murray " light track cart for 
matinees, workouts, speeding and jogging. First- 
class, down to date cart, weight 45 to 50 pounds. 
('Teat strength and carrying power, absolute 
f et dom of any horse motion . ConstciK ted from 
the lje>'t second growth white hickory. Best 
guaranteed grade of pneumatic tires, handsome- 
ly finished in rich carmine or royal blue, with 
brass screen dash, detachable, and accessoriei 
consisting of serviceable foot pump, complete 
tool and repaii kit. wrenches, oil can, etc., etc. 
Weight crated 90 pounds. Urand new and will 
be shipped to any address. For price address: 
F. W. KKLLKV, 

HllKKDKlt .V.Nli Sl'ORTS.MAN. 



HIGH-CLASS TROTTING BRED COLTS 
FOR SALE. 

No. 1. Three-year-old filly sired by All 
Style, dam Dr. Hicks. This Ally is regis- 
tered. 

No. 2. T^vo-year-old colt, full brother 
to the above. 

No. 3. Two-year-old Ally sired by Dan 
Logan, dam a Wilkes mare who was a 
great natural pacer but unfortunately was 
crippled by a barbed wire accident as a 
yearling and was never worked. 

The All Styles are large, strong built. 
With all the style of their sire, perfect in 
action, and all three of the above colts 
.should make race horses second to none. 
The Dan Logan filly is perfectly gentle to 
handle and drive and is a high-class flliy 
in every respect. Apply to or address, 
■ • F. EATON, ChIco, Cal. 



HOUSEHOLD SUPPIIES:- 

"Smith's Pay the Freight"— to reduce the 
high cost of living, send for our Wholesale to 
Consumer Catalogue. Smith's Cash .Store. 110-B 
Clay Street. San Francisco. 

Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Every facility to give the beat of pi-o- 
feaslonal services to all cases of veterlii- 
ary dentistry. Complicated cases treated 
successfully. Calls from out of town 
promptly responded to. 

The beat work at reaaonable pricaa 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL 
630 Fulton St. 

Ssn Frsnclsco, Csl. 



A"365"Day Liniment 



YOU ARE SAYING TO YOURSELF— 
"If I only knew of something to stop 
that Backache — help my Rheumatism — cure my 
Neuralgia, I would send and get it at once." 
Gombault's Caustic Balsam will give you immediate 
A Marvelous Human Flesh Healer and a never failing 
remedy for every known pain that can be relieved or cured by 
external applications. Thousands testify to the wonderful healing and 
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soothe, heal and cure your every day pains, wounds and bruises. 




Get It. 
Relief. 




Gombault's Caustic Balsam ^ 

The Great French Remiedy 

Will Do It ^ 



^ It Help* Nature to Heal and Care. Penetrates, acts quickly, yet Is^^J, 
perfectly harmless. Kills all Germs and prevents Blood Poison. Nothing 
so good known as an application for Sores, Wounds, Felons, Exterior 
Cancers, Burns, Carbuncles and Swellings. 

"I had a bad hand with four running sores on It. The more I doctored the 
worse it got. I used Caustic Balsam and never needed a doctor after that." 
— Ed. Rosenbure, St. Ansgat, la. 

Mtm. Jame* McKenzie, Edina, Mo., eayt! "Just ten applications of 
Caustic Balsam relieved me of goitre. My husband also cured eczema with It. 
and we use it for corns, bunions, colds, sore throat and pain in the chest." 

A Safe, Reliable Remedy for Sore Throat, Chest Cold, Backache. 
Neuralgia, Sprains, Rheumatism and Stiff Joints. Whenever and 
wherever a Liniment is needed Caustic Balsam has no Equal. 

Dr. Higley, Whitewater, Wit., write*: "I have been using Caustic Balsam 
for ten years for different ailments. It has never failed me yel." 

A liniment that not only heals and cures Human Flesh, but for years 
the accepted Standard veterinary remedy of the world. 

Price, $1.50 per bottle at all Druggists or sent by us express prepaid. 
Write for Free Booklet and read what others say. 

THE LAWRENCE WILUAMS CO^ Qeveland. Ohio 



Saturday, January 1, 1916] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



13 



BEAUTIFUL BELVEDERE 



LOTS FOR SALE 



CORINTHIAN ISLAND Subdivision to Belvedere is the 
most beautiful spot on the shores of San Francisco Bay 
for a suburban home. It commands an extensive view of 
the City of San Francisco, Alcatraz and Angel Islands, 
Raccoon Straits, San Francisco Bay, Richardson's Bay, 
the Berkeley shore, beautiful Belvedere and Mt. Tamal- 
pais. It is in Marin County, directly opposite San Fran- 
cisco, and forms the eastern shore of Belvedere cove. 
It has a naturally terraced, sunny, western slope that is 
well adapted for many choice residence sites, every one 
affording most picturesque views of the bay and moun- 
tain. It is protected from the prevailing western trade winds in 
summer by Belvedere Island, and from the southerly storms in 
winter by Angel Island. The soil is fertile and part of the island 
is well wooded. 

It is less subject to fog than any other place near San 
Francisco. The summer fog, as it rolls in from the ocean, splits 
on the western slope of Sausalito, part of it flowing in a line with 
Angel Island towards the Berkeley shore, and part of it along 
the southern slope of Mt. Tamalpais, leaving Belvedere, Corin- 
thian Island and Raccoon Straits in the bright sunlight, while 
the fog banks can be seen as a white wall both to the north and 
the south. 

There is very little available land about the shores of San 
Francisco Bay that is desirable for homes, especially for those 
who love boating and kindred sports. The Alameda and Contra 
Costa shores of the bay are the lee shores and receive the full 
brunt of the boisterous trade winds which lash the shoal waters 
near the land into muddy waves, making boating both unpleas- 
ant and dangerous. To the north of the city and in Marin 
County the land from Sausalito to the entrance of the bay is a 
Government reservation and will never be placed on the market. 
The shores of Richardson's Bay are not at present convenient 
to boat service and, aside from Belvedere and Corinthian Island, 
there is little or no land near any ferry landing that possesses 
the natural advantages, improvements and possibilities that are 
offered on Corinthian Island. Concrete roads, pure water, tele- 
phone service and electric light wires are already installed. It is 
only ten minutes' walk from any point on the property to 
Tiburon boats, and but forty-three minutes' ride to the foot of 
Market Street. 

On the point of Corinthian Island the Corinthian Yacht 
Club has had its home for many years, and on any summer day 
the white sails of its numerous fleet add to the charming scene, 
as the trim yachts glide about the cove. Excellent fishing of all 
kinds for bay fish, including salmon, the gamey striped bass, 
rock fish and the toothsome silver smelt, is to be had in the cove. 
There is probably no spot so accessible and in such close prox- 
imity to any large city in the world that offers the attractions 
of climate, magnificent scenery, fishing and boating as will here 
be found. 



FOR MAPS, PRICES AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO 



S. L. PLANT, 

PLANT RUBBER AND SUPPLY CO., 

32 B£AL£ STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 



6U 



F. W. KELLEY. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN OFFICE, 

366 PACIFIC BUILDING 

San Francisco, Cal. 



THE BREEDER AND 



SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 1, 1916 



DIVERSITY OF FARM ENTER- 
PRISES. 



In most cases where studies on the 
profits in farming have been made, 
particularly in our oldest agricultural 
districts, such studies indicate that the 
most successful farms are those which 
have from two to four major sources 
of income, i. e.. they have a well-bal- 
anced and diversified business. In cer- 
tain instances it may pay better to 
have only one enterprise, but usually 



v.'hen one crop pays much better than 
all others the production of it in- 
creases rapidly and soon the price 
falls to the point where other crops 
or products are equally as profitable. 
Diversified farmin.e; is often confused 
with farmin,? where there is a little 
of everythin.s; and not much of any- 
thing. Either extreme lessens the 
chances of success. When the price of 
certain crops is very low then live- 
stock usually becomes desirable. How- 
ever, if the returns per animal are 



WHEN YOU SEE 





these blemishes on your horses, remember we have shown and proven 
for over 20 years, that Save-The-Horse positively cures them. 

Doubt and fear never earned — or cured anything— and delay is costly. The Horse 
Cannot Cure Itself! Money Must be Spent! The Problem is, to SPEND WISELY. 

Save-the-Horse Does Not Blister 

Does Not Discolor or Destroy the Hair Nor Leave a Scar 

Horse vi/orks as usual. 

THE RESULT IS PERMANENT. 

"It's the Most Powerful Medicine I Ever Used," 
writes \V. J. Stonesefer, Route 1, Keymar, Md. 



Eevery bottle .«oki with Signed 
Contract to return iiidiuy if 
remedy fails on UinRbone ■ — 
Thoropin — Spavl n — or Any 
Shoulder. Knee. Ankle. Hoof or 
Tendon Disease. 



Kegardle.-i.s of price or any other reason, Save-The- 
Horse is the cheapest remedy known. It goes 
through ami through both bone and tissue — it 
works inside, not outside — and prodvices a cure 
that withstands every test. No blistering, scar or 
loss of hair. Horse can work as usual — winter or 
summer. 



But write, describins; your case and we will send our — 96-page illustrated 
Book — Sample Contract and Advice — All Free (to Horse Owners and Managers). 

TROY CHEMICAL CO.. BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



D. E. NEWELL, Agent, 80 Bayo Vista Ave., OAKLAND, CAL. 



Druggists lOvi Tvw ii' I ■ 



■-The-lli>i-.;e with Cotitiv 
Post Prepaid. 



sent by P.-irecl 



poor, cash crops even at a low price 
are essential. A well-balanced busi- 
ness insures against losses and pro- 
vides a much better utilization of the 
labor and equipment. 

o 

TO MAKE GOVERNMENT WHITE- 
WASH. 



Take half a bushel of unslacked 
lime; slack it with boiling water and 
cover during the process to keep it in 
the steam; strain the liquid through 



a fine seive or strainer; add a peck of 
salt previously well dissolved in warm 
water, 'three pounds of ground rice 
boiled to a thin paste, and stir in boil- 
ing liot one-half pound of powdered 
Spanish whiting and one pound of glue 
which has been previously dissolved 
over a slow fire, and add five gallons 
hot water to the mixture. Stir well 
pnd let it stand for a few days, covered 
\in from the dirt. It should be put on 
hot. One pint of mixture will cover a 
square yard properly applied. 



Pedigrees Tabulated 

— Typewritten, Suitable For Framing = 
Registration Standard-Bred Horses Attended to 

Stallion Service Books, $1.00 
Stallion Folders 

with picture of tiie horse and terms on first page; complete tabulated pedigree 
on the two inside pages and description on back page 

Stallion Cards for Posting 

size, one-half sheet, 14x22; size one-third sheet, 11x14 

Stallion Cards 

two sides, size 3>i x 6Ji, to fit envelop 
ADDRESS 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



366 PACIFIC BLDG. 
I SAN FRANCISCO. 



Harpers Weekly and The Breeder and Sportsman 

$5.52 WORTH FOR $3.^ 



Breeder and Sportsman 

One Year, 52 Copies. Regular Price $3 

THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN is the oldest 
weekly journal devoted to the Horse west of Chicago, 
having been established in 1882. This Interest, together 
with the Kennel, Gun, Fishing, Coursing and kindred 
sports receiving the most attention in its columns; to- 
gether with Agricultural and Dairying Departments, 
under whose headings especial attention is paid to the 
breeding, etc., of Cattle, Sheep, Hogs, Poultry, and all 
other animals connected with stock raising. 

As an advertising medium to Racing Associations, 
Horsemen, Stock Breeders, Manufacturers of Sulkies, Car- 
riages, Wagons, Agricultural and Dairying Implements 
and Machinery, Sporting Goods, Fanciers, Stock Foods, 
and all others desiring to bring their wares to the atten- 
tion of the classes to whose Interests the paper is devoted 
within the field mentioned above, the BREEDER AND 
SPORTSMAN will be found indispensable. 



Harpers Weekly 

Six Months, 26 Copies, Regular Price $2.50 

At no time has It been so evident to Americans as now. 
that the most important thing in the lives of all of us is 
the progress of the European War. 

Next to your daily bread the war Interests you most 
vitally. It may even come to be the most important part 
of your problem of living. 

The periodical of greatest fundamental Interest to you 
today is the one that can best report those phases of the 
war that come closest to your country and you. 

Because of connections abroad and at home, HARPER'S 
WEEKLY is that publication. 

As a critical commentary that presents Inside facts, It 
is the necessary bridge for intelligent readers between 
the dally newspaper and the monthly review. 

You want HARPER'S WEEKLY now. You can get It 
now on trial at a remarkable reduction. 



Send $3.25 Now and Get Them Both 

THIS OFFER is made to all ^\llo will semi us $;).25 before .January olst, 191(5, whether for extension of 
subscription, renewal of subscription or a new subscription. Address: 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



P. O. Drawer 447 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Saturday, January 1, 1916] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



IS 




COLT DISTEMPER 

Ton can prevent this loathsome disease from running 
througrh your stable and cure all the colts sufferine with 
it when you begin the treatment. No matter how youns, 
SPOHN'S is safe to use on any colt. It is wonderful how 
it prevents all distempers, no matter how colts or horses 
at any age are "exposed." All .good drug.gists and turf 
goods houses and manufacturers sell SPOHN'S at 50c 
and $1 a bottle; $5 and SIO per dozen. All druggists and 
manufacturers. SPOHN MEDICAL CO., 

Chemists and Bacteriologists, Goshen, Ind.. U. S. A. 



Ruby & Bowers 

DAVIS. CALIFORNIA 
Fm PORTERS OF 

Percherons, Belgians, Shires, Clydesdales, 
Hackneys, Coachers and Saddlers 

Large Selection Always on Hand for Sale on Liberal Terms 

nilR CATF RARN AT n AUK *^"PP''e* fo'i*tant market for all useful classes of FARJI 

uui\ o/iLri:. unixii ni vnvio ^^n city I)R.\ftek>. drivers and mules. \ve 

solicit consignments in lots from iiulividuals to carloads and will sell on terms to suit shippers 

ALL HOn.SES GUAR.\XTEED ABSOLUTELY AS REPRE.SENTED 



75 NEW YORK- 

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Through fare from San Francisco 
same as All-Rail and includes 
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THlb UREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 8, 1916. 



$3,000 



GUARANTEEO 



ONLY $2.°° TO NOMINATE MARE 



GUARANTEED 




Pacific Breeders Futurity Staices No. 16 

TO BE GIVEN BY THE 

Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association 

For Foals of Mares Covered in 1915 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old 

Entries Close February i, 19 1 6 



$3,000 



$1600 for Trotting Foals. 
$150 to Nominators of Dams of Winners 



$1100 for Pacing Foals 
$100 to Owners if Stallions 




$1000 for Three-Year-Old Trotters. 

50 to the Nominator of the Dam on whose Original Entry is named the Winner of 
Three-Year-Old Trot. 
600 for Two-Year-Old Trotters. 
25 to the Nominator of the Dam on whose Original Entry is named the Winner of 
Two-Year-Old Trot. 

50 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when Mare 
was bred. 



$700 for Three- Year-Old Pacers. 

50 to the Nominator of 'he Dam on whose Original Entry is named the Winner of 
Three- Year-Old Pace. 
400 for Two-Year-Old Pacers. 
26 to the Nominator of the Dam on whose Original Entry is named the Winner of 
Two-Year-Old Pace. 

50 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace when Mare 
was bred. 



SPECIAL CASH PRIZES FOR STALLION OWNERS. 

Given to Owners of Stallions standing: highest in number of Marcs iioniiiiatcd in this Stake tliat wore bred to their respective horses, divided as follows: 

FIRST PRIZE, $35; SECOND PRIZE, $15. 

The Above Prizes will be Paid on February 20(h, 1916 

ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS — ^$2 to nominate mare on February 1. 191G: when name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given; $5 August 1, 1916; 
$10 on Yearlings January 1. I'.ll"; $10 on Two-Year-Olds January 1. lyiS; $10 on Three-Yuar-OUls January 1. I'Jl'J. 

STARTING PAYMENTS.— $25 to start in the Two-Year-Old Pace; $35 to start in the Two-Year-Old Trot; $35 to start in the Three-Year-Old Pace; $50 to start in the 
Three-Year-Old Trot. -Vll Starting Payments to be made ten days before the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 

Nominators must designate when making payments to start whether the horse entered is a Trotter or Pacer. 

Colts that start at Two Years Old are not barred from starling again in the Three-Year-Old Divisions. 

CONDITIONS: 

The races fnr Two-Year-Olds will be mile heats, 2 in 3, not to exceed three heats, and if not decided in two heats, will be finished at the end of the third heat and money 
divided according lo rank in the summary; and for Three- Year-Olds — three heals, money divided 25 per cent to the first heat, 25 per cent to the second heat. 25 per cent to the 
third heat, and 25 per cent to the race according to rank in the summary. Money in each division 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. Should two or more horses be tied for first 
ol.ice a' the completion of the third heat, such horses only shall contest in a fourth heat and meney divided according lo rank in the summary at the termination of that heat. 
A horse having won the first two heats and drawn or distanced in the third heat shall net lose position in the summary. Distance for Two- Year-Oids, 150 yards; for Three- 
Yenr-Olds, 100 yards. 

If a mare proves barren or slips or has a dead foal or twins; or if either the mare or foal dies before January 1, 1917, her nominator may sell or transfer his nomination or 
substitute another mare or foal, regardless of ownership; but there will be no return of a payment, nor will any entry be liable for more than amount paid in or contracted for. 
In entries, the name, color and pedigree of mare must be given; also the name of the horse to which she was bred in 1915. 

Entries must be accompanied by entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $3000, the amount of the guar- 
antee, only. 

Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacing divisions. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these Slakes in case the number of entries received is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors. 
Money divided in each division of the Stake 50. 25, 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division or heat than there are starters. 
Entries open to the world. Alembership not required to enter; but no horses, wherever owned, will be allowed to start until the owner has become a member. 

Write for Entry Blanks to 

E. P. HEALD, F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 

President. P. O. Drawer 447. 366 Pacific Building, San Francisco, Cat. 



Pedigrees 

— Typemitten, Suitable 
Registration Staodard-Br 

Stallion Service 

Stallion Folders 




with picture of the horse and terms on first page ; complete tabulated pedigree 
on the two inside pages and description on back page 

Stallion Cards for Posting 

size, one-half sheet, 14x22; size one-third sheet, 11x14 

Stallion Cards 

two sides, size 3^ x 6}^, to fit envelop 
ADDRESS 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



366 PACIFIC BLDG. 
I SAN FRANCISCO. 



Saturday, January 8, 1916.] 



iHE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
Turf and Sporting Authority on the Pacific Coast. 
(Established 18S2.) 

I'ublished every Saturday. 

F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 



OFFICES: a63-365-366 PACFIC BUILDING 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Kranclsco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
National Newspaper Bureau, Agent, 219 East 23rd St., 

New York City. 
Entered as Second Class Hatter at San Francisco P. O. 



Terms — One year, $3; six months, $1.75; three months, $1. 

Foreign postage $1 per year additional; Canadian postage 
50c per year additional. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or regis- 
tered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 
44", San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



THE NECESSITY OF CONDITION. 



The returns from the recent Chicago sale lay 
especial emphasis upon the necessity of condition in 
animals sent to the great public sales from this or 
any other section of the land. The California patrons 
of the event spared no pains in picking from the best 
of their offerings to get together a consignment that 
in the whole would be truly representative of the 
California trotter as he really is, but for some reason 
they apparently failed to take the proper precautions 
needed to land their animals at the ring side in first- 
class condition. This applies most especially, from 
information obtainable at this distance from visitors 
to the auction, to the band that went from the north- 
ern "portion of the state, though those from the south 
reached the Windy City market in a condition that 
■>vas none too good. 

A letter from p prominent eastern trainer who was 
among those present, a man who was a steadfast 
booster for the Prince Ansel family in particular, 
bears the word that Prince Ansel, his youngsters and 
the few mares that formed the balance of the con- 
signment from the Woodland Stock Farm, reached 
the sales pavilion "in a most deplorable condition." 
Prince Ansel w.is low in flesh, weak, and presented 
the general appearance of a horse that was all in, 
not merely temporarily but permanently; the mares 
presented an unkempt, unattractive appearance, and 
the weanlings were so weak that their buyers are up 
against the task of feeding them for some weeks to 
get them to a point where they will have sufficient 
strength to stand breaking and handling. Under 
these circumstances, it is not to be wondered at that 
the grand old horse, with apparently many years of 
usefulness before him, should have sold at a price 
less than two hundred dollars, that the mares should 
have gone to new owners for practically nothing, 
and that the well bred colts and Allies should have 
been "butchered to make a Roman holiday." 

It is asking the impossible of buyers, especially in 
view of the .general state of the trotting horse 
market, to expect them to pay good prices, or even 
reasonably fair prices, for animals in this sort of 
shape, no matter what their breeding or their inher- 
ent qualities of excellence. Gold in its natural state 
would be passed by unrecognized by a very great 
majority of people, and an uncut diamond is a thing 
of little value when held up beside the finished prod- 
uct for comparison. To bring a price on the market 
these days, a brood mare even if she be a famous 
producer, must show virility and "good keeping qual- 
ities," while youngsters, especially weanlings, must 
be well grown, husky and full of life and spirit. To 
send any other kind to market is to invite disaster, 
and the invitation will be accepted without hesitation 
or apology. Horses cannot be jerked up out of 
paddock or pasture, railroaded for days at a stretch 
with indifferent attention enroute, and arrive at a 
sale ring in shape to sell. Sellers must be fitted to 
sell with all the care that campaigners are fitted to 
race if prices in keeping with their real value are to 
be realized, and this lesson is one that western breed- 
ers must take to heart if they are to ship successfully 
across the continent to market. Their own interests, 
as well as the good name of the California trotter, 
demand it, and we hope that never again will it be 
said of a shipment of locally bred animals that they 
reached the market in a "deplorable condition." They 
must reach there not merely in fair shape, but in 
prime shape — otherwise they had best be kept at 
home. 



Even men whose natural senses are defective in 
some manner or another realize the important part 
that condition jilays in contributing to the "tout 
ensemble" that constitutes real attractiveness in a 
horse. Some years ago before the motor had swept 
the highclass road horse from our city streets two 
men. excellent judges of horse flesh, were standing 
on a busy corner when an especially attractive outfit 
went breezing past. "Man I" exclaimed one of them 
enthusiastically. "Look at that bird of a trotter." 

"Wow!" rejoined his friend. "That is the best look- 
ing horse I ever saw in this whole Uurg!" Just then 
a third party behind them, hitherto unnoticed by 
either of the wise ones, added his mite. "Ciosh!" he 
chimed in, almost before the words of the second 
speaker were out of his mouth, "and ain't he fat!" 
At this the first pair turned to see who it was that 
joined them in expressing appreciation of a noble 
animal. 

It was a blind man! — but he knew horses. 
Need we rub the lesson deeper? 

o 

A WORD TO BREEDERS. 



With the season of 191.'') put once and forever 
behind them, and with January turning into its sec- 
ond week, the opening of the breeding season in this 
particular section of the world is not many moons 
removed, so that it behooves the owners of both 
brood mares and stallions to begin laying their plans 
for the year's activities along this line. The wise 
stallioneer is the one w^ho gets his horse or horses 
before the publi:- early and keeps them there through- 
out the season while the wily brood mare owner will 
soon begin to study of "pedigree and performance" 
as a means of determining to what stallion he will 
send his favorite mares. The mediums that bring 
the two together are announcements, through the 
trotting turf press, the stallion card and the season 
folder, all of which this office is in position to furnish 
to the very best advantage to all concerned. When 
midsummer rolls around the Breeder and Sportsman 
will have rounded out its thirty-fourth year of useful- 
ness to horsemen of the Pacific Coast, and with the 
passing of the Pacific Horse Review and the appar- 
ent elimination of the horse department from the 
pages of the North Pacific Rural Spirit, it becomes 
the sole far western servant of the horse breeder. 
For no season of this long term of life has it failed to 
put owmers of the two sexes of trotters into touch 
with each other and each other's horses, and in that 
time no stallion has risen to prominence in this state, 
or its nearest neighbors, whose fame has not been 
enhanced and the pocketbook of his owner enriched 
through the judicious patronage of our business pages 
and by means of advertising in other forms which 
emanated from this office. 

This, perhaps, is the strongest argument that we 
could advance in support of the statement that stal- 
lion owners will find the liberal use of our business 
pages, our reading columns and our advertising mat- 
ter of inestimable assistance in making their opera- 
tions profitable. It is the horse that is kept before 
the public eye that attracts the public attention, and 
the most successful sires are in every instance the 
ones that are the best advertised. Already we are 
listing orders for both season announcements in our 
"stallions for service" department, and for stallion 
cards and folders to be disseminated throughout the 
state by enterprising owners, and we will be glad to 
receive your orders and to extend to the filling of 
them every facility at our command. 

To brood mare owners we would say, watch the 
Breeder and Sportsman for the cards of the various 
horses that will be in service in California this sea- 
son, study them carefully to acquaint yourselves with 
their blood lines, their performances on the turf, and 
their achievements in the stud. Then mate each of 
your mares with the one horse whose blood should 
best nick with hers, according to your knowledge of 
speed production, and nominate her, at the proper 
time, in every futurity on the coast to which she is 
eligible. Haphazard breeding is no longer profitable 
(or rather it was never so), as the market for any 
kind of a trotter save one that will do to race is no 
longer worth breeding horses for, and a good young- 
ster without futurity engagements is just about as 
useful as a shirt without a tail — and in just about as 
great demand. 

We are fully aware of the trials that have beset 
the horse breeder in this section for the last several 
years, and of the considerable decrease in breeding 
operations, a decrease that will have the effect of 
putting just so many dollars more on the price of 



every really good trotting bred horse in the not far 
distant future. The eventual establishment of dis- 
trict fairs in this state is inevitable, a modification in 
the present laws prohibiting race track gambling in 
every form is not improbable, and with the coming of 
either district fairs or pari-mutuals the price of trot- 
ters and pacers will go upward with a rush. We are 
in hard straits at present, as no one will deny, but 
our condition will be bettered with the coming years. 
The wise breeder will prepare against that day. 

.^ome years ago when thoroughbred ra<'ing was 
abolished practi<ally throughout the I'niti'd States, 
tlie owners of mares of that class found themselves 
in much the same predicament in which the harness 
horse breeders are involved at present--perhap9 
worse, for the trotting mare has a wider field of 
usefulness than h.er less generally serviceable sister. 
And about the best use an owner could devise for 
his matrons was to breed them to jacks, a practice 
that for some seasons was not unusual, or if he held 
a particular grudge against some ancient enemy he 
could even all scores by wishing onto him a big 
band of thoroughbred mares. There was no market 
in the country for a colt of pure lineage of the run- 
ning strains, and the result was that breeding of that 
class of horses was practically discontinued for a 
term of years. Then came the swing of the pendulum 
in the other direction, and owners of good colts found 
themselves well prepared to fill the fast growing 
demand for them at fair prices. In fact, there were 
not a sufficient number of thoroughbreds of real 
quality to go around, hence the European visits of 
tile emissaries of various wealthy horsemen and their 
return with goodly numbers of foreign bred young 
things. At this writing, the owner of a really good 
mare has the satisfaction of knowing that if he 
breeds her to the proper sire he has every chance in 
the world of disposing of the resultant foal at a 
handsome profit, and the thoroughbred revival has 
not yet gotten well into its stride. There are yet a 
good many horses well along in years that are able 
to go to the post and bring home the bacon occasion- 
ally, but the ranks of this class are rai)idly being 
thinned, so that when the last of them are gone the 
demand for the younger ones that are up and coming 
will be just so much more pronounced, with prices 
just so much higher. Now is dawning the day of 
harvest for the few men who maintained their breed- 
ing operations even in a curtailed fashion in the face 
of the discouragements of the past several seasons, 
and the experiences of the breeders of the trotter will 
be found to run in similar lines. 

Retrenchment at this moment is not going to im- 
prove your condition. Keep going, keep breeding 
good mares to good stallions, keep nominating the 
foals, keep training them and going to what races 
are available, and some day you will find that you 
have worked out your own salvation and that of a lot 
of other good men and true, and you will be well 
repaid for all the dark days that have been your lot. 

o 

THE THOROUGHBRED AND THE FAIR. 



Wliile once in a while we strike an "orthodox" 
harness horseman who can see absolutely no good 
whatever in the recent suggestion from the members 
of the Golden Gate Thoroughbred Breeders' Associ- 
ation that the thoroughbred be given recognition in 
making up the sp«"ed programs of the county and 
district fairs throughout the state and that the two 
interests pool their resources and join hands in the 
fight for a state subsidy for fairs and the enactment 
of ameliorating legislation, Ihi' general run of men 
with whom we have talked the matter over r*>aliz»» 
that much might be accomplished for lh(> good of the 
cause through such concerted action, and feel that 
the proper steps should be taken to bring about a 
union of what have, in the past, been "warring fac- 
tions." Personally, the editor of this publication, 
while fully aware of the numerous obstacles that 
mtist be met and overcome before such a consum- 
mation is within the range of practicability and pos- 
sibility, is heartily in favor of making a try at it. 
II has been done before with excellent results, as, for 
example, at the Arizona .State Fair, and there is no 
really valid reason why it cannot be done throughout 
a circuit of smaller fairs, such as those we have 
here in California. 

We would appreciate the expressions of horsemen 
of both persuasions In regard to the proposition, as 
in that manner the key to the situation may best bo 
devised. State your views to us personally or by 
letter, and don't be afraid to speak right out in 
meeting. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday. January 8, 1916. 



The Blue Cross and the Great War 

— ^ JOHN ASHTOX. HREEDEKS' GAZETTE^ =z 



"And for those also, O Lord, the humble 
beasLs. who, with us. bear the burden and 
heat of the day, and offer their gruileless 
lives for the well-being of their countries, 
we entreat Thy great tenderness of heart, 
for Thou hast promised to save both man 
and beast; and great is Thy loving kind- 
ness. O Master. .Saviour of the world!" 

This beautiful and touching prayer from the Rus- 
sian Liturgy of St. Basil, written A. D. 370, is still 
remembered, in principle, by the Cossack when he 
sallies forth to battle, mounted on his fleet and wiry 
steed — the Arab of the Steppes. While praying for 
his own salvation he does not forget to intercede for 
his horse, for he estimates and appreciates the value 
of his faithful servitor at its true worth. He is well 
aware, too, like a general of troops, like the Bedouin 
of the desert, like the cowboy of the west, like the 
vaquero of the pampas, how very essential to him 
is the fitness and well-being of his horses. 

It was Buffon, the great French philosopher and 
naturalist, who declared that the greatest conquest 
man ever made was when he subjugated and tamed 
the wild horse and made llie noble beast his servitor 
and helpmeet. We have recently seen accounts in 
the press wherein writers with more sentiment than 
specific knowledge of the subject have seriously pre- 
dicted that mechanical vehicles would, in the near 
future, entirely supplant horses, and other beasts 
of burden, for military purposes; so that, conse- 
quently, the terrible suffering endured by our inno- 
cent dumb friends in warfare would be avoided. Un- 
fortunately such Utopian desires will never be real- 
ized. The horse is for ever predestined to pay his 
share of the sacrifices demanded by war. As well 
might a general think of equipping his army without 
guns or rifles as to dispense with horses. Without 
horses (or some animal equivalent, at least) his 
field artillery would be useless; and his men must 
have their supplies, and wounded must be evacuated 
in regions inaccessible to motor-driven vehicles. Then 
of course cavalry will always be an indispensable 
element of an army in the field. 

Indeed, it almost seems an anomaly, living as we 
do in a mechanical age, as it were, to note how- 
dependent we are on the horse's energy and versatil- 
ity for the successful conduct of military operations. 
Despite the incredible and unprecedented number of 
automobiles and motor wagons of various descrip- 
tions being employed in the great war, never was 
the need of horses more forcibly felt, never were 
their services more appreciated, and never were they 
employed in such vast numbers in warfare previ- 
ously. As to their effectiveness and the role they 
have played in this war, to only cite what happened 
in the preliminary days of the conflict would amply 
justify the most flattering eulogiums in behalf of 
our friend the horse. We know that in the famous 
retreat from Mons, the (at that time) "little army" 
of Marshal French was in grave danger of being cap- 
tured or annihilated by the tremendous strength of 
the Germans, greatly superior in numbers. The grip 
was tightening on his two flanks; almost every road 
was blocked: the road leading into the fortified town 
of Maubeuge (still held by the French at that time) 
was purposely left open by the Germans, as the latter 
expected that French would allow his toops to be 
driven, like sheep to the fold, into the false security 
of a fortified town. But French was too wary for 
that; he knew that the fate of his whole army would 
have been sealed had he entered Maubeuge — it would 
have been a second Sedan. The rear-guard actions 
fought in that memorable retreat form one of the 
most gloriously epic pages in Britain's history. But 
all this would have been to no purpose had it not been 
for the magnificent work of the English cavalry, 
fighting and riding like demons to prevent the envel- 
oping tactics of the Teutons. Thus the retreat was 
successfully carried out in good order, almost to the 
gates of Paris; then the English army re-formed, 
turned about, and together with the French delivered 
the staggering blow to the Germans at the battle of 
Marne. 

The Germans, too, are indebted to the horse for 
many of their initial successes of the campaign, when 
great masses of their cavalry swept all over Belgium 
and the north of France, moving at a great pace, like 
swarms of hungry locusts. And later in their eastern 
operations the rapidity of their advance in Courland 
and Lithuania has been due to their formidable and 
numerous cavalry contingents; while, at the time of 
writing, we learn that the junction of the Germano- 
Austrian and Bulgarian armies was effected by means 
of rapid cavalry tactics. 

True that since the trench mode of warfare became 
imperative, cavalry work has been relegated to the 
second place, yet it should not be surmised that 
horse regiments have been altogether idle. Patrol 
work still goes on, and in every big offensive move- 
ment, whether by the British. Germans or French, 
masses of cavalry have invariably been mustered just 
behind the infantry, ready to pierce the shattered 
lines of the enemy, so as to make a rapid advance. 
But cavalry only absorbs a portion of the horses re- 
quired in a military campaign. The stupendous num- 
ber of guns employed in this frightful war means vast 
numbers of horses, and large reserves must be con- 
stantly on hand to fill the breaches made by disease, 
shot and shell. Millions of men in the field require 



an enormous amount of food, munitions, equipment 
and supplies in general. The bulk of this work- 
hauling from the railway stations nearest the front 
to the trenches — falls to the horse. 

Up to the first days of November we know offi- 
cially that England had already 800.000 head in the 
field. I am informed on good authority that France 
had 600,000. Judging from these figures we can cal- 
culate about 1.500.000 for Germany and Austria- 
Hungary. We can count on Italy's having about 
300.000 and Russia must have employed at least 
700,000 or 800,000; while we can put down about 
600,000 for Turkey, Bulgaria, Servia and Montenegro. 
Thus we get about 4,500,000 head for the nations at 
war in Europe — and the end is not yet in sight! Of 
course included in these numbers are many mules to 
share the credit with the horse; England has pur- 
chased many, but the proportion among the other 
powers is small, except perhaps in the case of Italy. 
Certainly automobiles have done wonders in this war. 
yet it should be observed that their utilization in 
such large numbers has simply meant that it has 
enabled military strategists to conduct the war on a 
scale of magnitude never before heard of. Mechan- 
ical vehicles have supplemented the work of the 
horse. Indeed, it may be said that railways, auto- 
mobiles, and horses are necessary complements to 
one another. Each has its own particular sphere of 
activity; there is plenty of room for all three . 

As soon as war was declared, emissaries from the 
various fighting powers began buying horses. Read- 
ers of these lines will know of the consistent pur- 
chases made in the states and Canada. Large num- 
bers have been bought also in Argentina. France 
and England have been heavy buyers in America. 
Certainly this does not necessarily mean that these 
countries are actually short of equine stock; rather 
does it signify that the native breeding stock and 
active work hor!--es in those countries must not be 
too unduly drawn upon in furnishing the necessary 
quota for military purposes. The idea is to buy 
cheaper horses, which will answer the same purpose 
as more expensive native animals for a short life 
under shot and shell fire. 

What a mighty good job it is for these countries 
that they are able to replenish their wants by buying 
elsewhere; otherwise the calamity to native breeding 
stock would be almost irreparable. Germany had 
been preparing for a long time, and had bought both 
breeding and service stock extensively for years in 
France and Belgium. Just before the war broke out 
she concluded an enormous purchase of Irish horses 
for cavalry purposes. To fill up gaps during the 
course of the war she has had all Belgium, prac- 
tically, to draw on, as well as much of northern 
France, including the Ardennes, where good draft 
stock abounds. She has doubtless been able to pur- 
chase many horses in Sweden, Denmark, and Hol- 
land; and even to cede draft stock to her ally, 
Austria-Hungary, a country notoriously deficient in 
heavy draft horses. I have traveled in that country 
and remarked that much of the heavy hauling and 
plowing is done by oxen. On the other hand, the 
fertile plains of Hungary produce myriads of light 
horses, rustic and resistant, suitable for cavalry 
work and light hauling. Since the war began, many 
of these Hungarian horses have most certainly been 
acquired by the Germans to replenish losses in cav- 
alry mounts. Russia is about the only fighting power 
entirely independent in the matter of horses, as the 
Steppes produce almost unlimited numbers. Italy is 
probably the country where the proportion of mules 
to horses in use in the war is greater than with any 
other belligerent power. Turkey, it should be noted, 
is employing a lot of camels as pack animals. 

If war means glory and honor, and, when it is just, 
stirs the patriotic sentiments to their innermost 
depths in loyal breasts, it also signifies a fearful 
amount of physical and moral suffering to man and 
beast. Yes, who, knowing well the temperament of 
man's noblest friend, can deny that the horse suffers 
morally? His bodily sufferings in a war are indis- 
putably great. Presenting a relatively large target 
to all kinds of missiles, unable to take cover like his 
master, defenceless, and oblivious of danger, his lot 
is, indeed, a pitiable one. What a grand thing it is 
that there are men and women who. while ready at 
all times to help in the work of alleviating human 
suffering — the most noble and sacred duty of all — 
are yet willing to aid in a practical manner the 
humane efforts tending to succor wounded and dis- 
eased animals evacuated from the front. 

During the Balkan War of 1912 an organization 
known as the Blue Cross, under the auspices of the 
Dumb Friends' League. London, Eng., began to 
undertake the work of caring for horses and kindred 
animals wounded and disabled in military opera- 
tions. At the beginning of the present war this soci- 
ety, which is supported by voluntary contributions, 
offered its services to the French Ministry of W'ar. 
They were gladly accepted, and several hospitals, 
capable of accommodating in the aggregate many 
hundreds of equine patients, were established at con- 
venient points in the rear of the fighting line. The 
British army have their own veterinary corps, dating 
from the Boer War, but as the French were not 
similarly organized it will be seen that La Croix 
Bleue (as it is known in France) had ample scope to 



carry on its good work. The first hospital was 
formed at Lerqueux; this place was eventually 
closed, as it became part of the English army zone. 
Shortly after Lerqueux hospitals were opened at 
Troyes, Provins, Moret. and St. Manimes. Experi- 
enced veterinary surgeons, assistants, and grooms 
were engaged to operate these establishments. It 
is hardly necessary to state that the results obtained 
have been eminently satisfactory to the French mili- 
tary authorities. When Italy joined in the war she 
sent representatives to the headquarters in London 
and also to France to study the working of these 
hospitals. The Earl of Lonsdale, president of the 
Blue Cross, ably assisted the Italians to organize 
their society. The result was that the Italian Gov- 
ernment decided to form a Blue Cross (Croce Az- 
zurra) to take cliarge of its wounded and sick horses 
during the campaign. The Italians seem to have done 
the thing thoroughly, and have completely militar- 
ized the movement. 

The work of th"^ Blue Cross, attached to the French 
Ministry of War, is of course necessarily limited in 
its scope on account of its being kept up by char- 
itable subscriptions. Only the lack of sufi'icient 
funds has prevented this society from opening up 
many more hospitals. That there was ample room 
for an extension of the work the writer of these lines 
can vouch for from personal experience connected 
with the organization. Any one who has been over 
a battlefield or seen the poor, wounded creatures 
being unloaded at some depot behind the front, can 
quite realize the need there is for charity in this 
direction. The cost of operating the hospitals is con- 
siderable. All the grain, forage, head collars, stall 
ropes, drugs and medicines, blankets, instruments, 
blacksmiths' forges, bandages, and wages of staff are 
furnished by the society. The French are not out of 
pocket one penny. Even the rent of the buildings is 
paid by the Blue Cross. While the bulk of the funds 
comes from London, many charitably disposed per- 
sons in France have rendered signal help. Certain 
Americans have also sent subscriptions. Probably 
more funds would have been sent in were it not for 
the fact that many people thought because the soci- 
ety w as accepted by the French army the latter paid 
the bills. 

The hospitals are inspected frequently by the 
French military veterinarians and staff officers. As 
soon as a batch of patients is cured and ready to 
leave the animals are submitted to the examination 
of these officers, who accept them or order them to 
remain longer in the hospital, as the case may be. 
Wonderful results in the way of cures have been 
obtained. From Moret and St. Mammes (the chief 
hospitals near to each other) at the date of writing 
(Nov. 5) about 900 head have been evacuated as 
completely cured. All these animals will go back to 
the front. At the time Troyes was closed early in 
October, through lack of funds, nearly .'jOO head had 
been sent out cured, and at the time of writing Prov- 
ins had evacuated a like number. Time means 
money where horses are kept, so the idea is to cure 
and fatten up the horses as quickly as possible. The 
vast majority of slightly wounded and run-down 
cases are of course treated by the French in their 
own cavalry depots; yet it should be said that a vast 
number of horses that died or were sold as cast 
could have been saved had there been money enough 
to open up more Blue Cross hospitals. 

Without dwelling on the technical side of the sub- 
ject I might say that almost every disease and 
wound known to veterinary science found its way 
into these hospitals. Shrapnel wounds (principally 
in the back and croup) were numerous. Bullet 
wounds in various parts of the body were frequent; 
many horses had an eye shot out. without otherwise 
being injured. Bayonet wounds, and wounds from 
aerial darts dropped by aviators were met with oc- 
casionally. Fearful wounds in the limbs were often 
met with. These injuries made one reflect on the 
great number of horses killed outright, or those so 
severely injured that human aid could avail nothing. 
Some horses were completely riddled in the back 
and croup with projectiles, and numerous operations 
had to be performed before the animal was cured. 
These animals formed the "interesting cases." Two 
classed of injuries showed up in quite phenomenal 
numbers, fistulous withers and quittors. A veterin- 
inarian saw more of these cases in six months of the 
war than he would encounter in all his life in normal 
times. Both of these conditions take a long time to 
cure, especially the former. Strange to say, I never 
saw a single case of poll-evil, but we had lameness 
in all its many and varied forms. Founder was met 
with frequently; cracked heels galore; as well as 
rope galls and sore backs. Lymphangitis cases were 
numerous, and we had navicular disease, sidebones. 
ringbones, spavins, stringhalt. capped hocks and 
thrush without end; canker in foot rarely. 

When the cold weather came on last winter we got 
a great number of lousy and mangy horses at Ler- 
queux. and all of them were in a run-down condition. 
All these cases were clipped before being treated. 
I ought to mention that all the French horses were 
inoculated with mallein as a precaution against glan- 
ders. Chronic lameness, such as navicular disease, 
generally meant the operation of neurotomy. Tre- 
panning was also practiced with success. Pneumonia 
cases were not infrequent; while the great, insidious 
enemy of the horse — colic — often showed itself. 

However, the mortality was very low on the aver- 
age. The most deaths occurred subsequently to the 
retreat from Belgium and the battle of the Marne. 
Oh! what poor skeletons I saw at Lerqueux! Some 



Saturday, January 8, 1916.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



Good and Bad Effects of "Early Closers' 

- = TEDD H. KLINE. HORSE WORLD — 



of the poor beasts had been galloped about for days 
and days without hardly anything to eat and drink: 
they were all lousy, too. So weak were they that, 
covered with sores and wounds, they could scarcely 
walk from the railway station to the hospital. The 
poor animals ate ravenously, and Just when some of 
them appeared to be doing well they would break 
down, and, despite every care, give up the ghost. 
Later, after the trench mode of warfare began, there 
was a great diminution of such extreme anemic, run- 
down cases. Every type and breed of horses in west- 
ern Europe passed through our hands: also horses 
from north Africa brought by the P"'rench colonial 
troops, such as Barbs and Arabs — beautiful, small 
horses. I saw many Percheron mares and geldings, 
and Nivernais, Ardennais, and Boulonnais: occasion- 
ally we got a Shire or a Clydesdale gelding — some 
horses that had escaped from the British and got into 
the French lines. Many Thoroughbreds were seen 
that had been requisitioned from racing stables; we 
also had a few wounded mules, and once in a while 
we got a German horse. But horses have no nation- 
ality; a horse is a horse, and equal care and atten- 
tion are lavished on all. 

We have had a fair number of American and 
Canadian horses under treatment: some of these do 
not make the most tractable patients, especially 
when in the blacksmith's hands. As I am pen- 
ning these lines a troop of cavalry (reserves) are 
passing my window; all the riders are mounted on 
American horses. Receiving as we do horses of all 
dispositions, one must be continually on the lookout 
against accidents. While the writer was at Troyes 
one of the grooms received a kick in the abdomen 
which caused his death in about 30 hours. This is 
the only fatal accident that I know of in connection 
with the Blue Cross work. Many horses arrive so 
weak that one can do almost anything with them, 
but regaining strength often imparts a friskiness 
more than interesting. All the equine patients in a 
convalescent state are regularly given the freedom 
of large pastures for a few hours daily, weather per- 
mitting; in other cases the horses are walked in 
fours, two or three miles on the road. 

A register of all the animals is carefully kept at 
every hospital, giving the military matriculation 
(stamped on the hoof), stall number, age, color, 
height, markings, and nature of injury or disease, as 
the case might be. In some cases horses have been 
recognized that have sojourned in the same hospital 
on two or three separate occasions. 

Once more the anniversary of Him who died for 
man comes round with no signs of peace on the trou- 
bled horizon in Europe. But let us all fervently hope 
that an enduring Treaty of Peace will have been 
long ago signed ere another Christmas comes, and 
that peaceful arts and commerce will gradually dissi- 
pate the acrimony, jealousy, hate and spite of the 
warring nations. Certainly nobody ever hopes to see 
such another horribly destructive war as this. Long, 
long years will be needed to heal the awful bruises 
sustained by all the belligerent powers. Some time 
in the future — not in our time, let us hope — another 
conflagration will break out among the civilized pow- 
ers. Then once more the horse — and his half-brother, 
the mule — will take their share of the sacrifice. 

Ju.st like the .simple soldier. 

Never tio rea.son why. 
Filling the breach when duty calls; 
Ready to do or die! 

O 

RASTUS 2:0514 COMES TO CALIFORNIA. 



The brown pacing gelding Rastus 2:0.5'/4 has been 
purchased from A. Traub of Kansas City, Mo., by 
S. H. Cowell of San Francisco and has been shipped 
to Walter Tryon at Sacramento. He is by Liberty 
Boy, a son of White Foot 10554, and his dam is 
Georgia Rose by Grant's Abdallah. He was a good 
consistent pacer on the Grand Circuit and will be a 
feature on the California circuit this year. Herschel 
Knight, caretaker of Rastus, started from Kansas 
City with the horse. Near Bonner Springs the car 
was sidetracked and entered by four men, who 
claimed they were railroad detectives and had to 
make a search, stating there had been a robbery. 
The leader pointed a gun at Herschel, with the com- 
mand "Hands upl" and immediately fired, the bull(?t 
passing through the young man's body. They then 
took the victim's watch and made their escape. 
Herschel staggered back to the caboose, bleeding 
copiously, and fell in a faint, where the train crew 
found him. He was taken to a Lawrence hospital, 
dying the next night. Herschel Knight was a good, 
clean young man, the only support of his mother, 
whom he left destitute at Kansas City. 

o 

SORT OF A "SIMULTANEOUS" BUNCH. 



The Cox family, of New Hampshire, had a field day 
on November 2. Walter, who was known as the 
David Harum of the trotting turf until he let Lee 
Axworthy 2:031^. Peter Scott 2:05^, and Mary Put- 
ney 2: 05 14, slip through his fingers, won his fifth 
race within a week. His father, (Charles E. Cox, was 
elected alderman in Manchester, N. H. I^ouis S. Cox, 
a brother, was chosen district attorney in Essex 
county, Mass., and Channing Cox, another brother, 
led the field in his election district in Boston as a 
candidate for the Massachusetts Legislature, in which 
he was the speaker of the house at the last session. — 
Spirit of the West. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Once upon a time an ambitious turf scribe, in a 
moment of enthusiasm, described horse racing as 
"The Sport of Kings." Truer words never were 
spoken, but had lliis same scribe been gifted with 
second sight or ability to see into the future he 
would have gone a little further and exclaimed, 
"Early Closing Events Will Also Be the Sport of 
Kings." 

For be it understood that pikers have no place in 
this realm. 

Talk about your stock exchange, your bucket shops, 
your faro bank, roulette wheel, poker, dice or the 
mere betting on a horse race. Why, any of these 
pastimes are casino compared with that terrific 
gambling game known as The Early Closing Event. 

Think of putting, we will say for argument, ten 
thousand dollars into a pool on March 15, that you 
will not race for until August 1. Think of the good 
things on March 15 that become pelters, for one 
reason or anotlier by August 1. Think of the owners 
who have contributed who never realized a cent on 
their investment. This is the only real, genuine, 
dyed-in-the-wool, blown on the bottle and marked 
on the wrapper bunco game in the world. 

Of course it is well known why, in the beginning, 
they were started. Simply because racing associa- 
tions needed running expenses to tide them over 
until their meetings had started, and I am not sure 
but what the same condition exists in many places 
today. 

But the point is, why will horsemen continue to 
cheat themselves? Is it because of the pot of gold 
they think is at the end of the rainbow? Can you 
imagine a good, game business man who races a trot- 
ter, taking the same chances with his money on any 
other proposition? I certainly cannot, and facts 
prove that he does not, but he thinks nothing at all 
of sending some 15 or 20 racing associations any- 
where from one to ten thousand dollars, months in 
advance of the laces, knowing then that he is liable 
never again to see a cent of his money. 

My rich friends — and I respect them all for what 
they mean to the business — will exclaim, "Bother 
ten thousand dollars, if we can get a Peter Scott and 
make a clean sweep through the Grand Circuit." 

But on the other hand, what of the middle man or 
poor man with only one horse or possibly two? Has 
he no place with us? Are we developing a game of 
freeze-out on the harness turf, where it soon will be 
a case of the survival of the fittest? 

Right now, I happen to know that the several 
tracks which represent the Grand Circuit have their 
books clogged with the accounts of poor horse own- 
ers who took that awful chance, staked what they 
thought were a couple of good ones clear through and 
then met with the inevitable. Some of these ac- 
counts have been settled with the various associa- 
tions at 50 cents on the dollar, some at 25 and some 
at 10, while others never will be settled. But these 
compromises helped but little for the reason that 
campaigners were kept out of the game for several 
seasons because they could not meet the demands of 
the associations, while others never will get back to 
the races on account of this sword of Damocles which 
hangs over their heads. 

I ask, in all fairness, is this condition right? We 
need every honest man we can get into the game, but 
we cannot get them in or keep those in which we 
already have, by strengthening the wall of early clos- 
ing events about us. 

It has been argued, by those who do not know the 
real facts, that the early closing event is a great 
stimulus to the sport because of its wonderful adver- 
tising power for the track. Perhaps — to advertise 
breweries, hotels, department stores, et cetera — but 
not the track. I am prepared to show you that as 
drawing cards for Grand Circuit lueetings or any 
other meetings for that matter, the early closing 
event is about the poorest proposition we have. And 
here's the reason. 

In the spring of the year, a secretary announces 
his early closing entry list. It is a good on(\ of many 
horses which (more's the pity) are known only to 
the regulars. Perhaps one or two are known to 
fame. Then the secretary or his publicity man pro- 
ceeds to furnish the daily papers of his city, r(>ani 
after ream concerning the horses which are to start 
in the so-called classics at his particular meeting. 
The public's appetite is whetted and curiosity 
aroused. 

"Bravo," they all cry. "At last we will get a chance 
to see Caesar The Just, which performed so well in 
the Peninsular ('ircuit last year and ended the sea- 
son by going a trial miU; in 2:04, at Lexington." 

All well and good, but when the day comes for the 
great race, Caesar the .lust and a dozen others that 
have been touted an! not even on the grounds or else 
are too lame to start, while your local newspaper 
men and race enthusiasts look daggers at the .secre- 
tary and publicity man and think things they dare 
not say or print. 

Here is another thing that makes the early closing 
event so much bunkum. 

And that is not all. If Caesar the Just happens to 
stay sound and reports for this race, he usually so 
far outclasses his opposition that the race is a joke 
and the public which has paid its hard earned money 
at the gate simply sneers at the management. 



If you think I exaggerate let me refresh your mem- 
ories slightly by recalling certain performers of by- 
gone days which made jokes out of nearly every 
early closing event in which they started: Direct 
Hal, Joe Patchen II., R. T. C, George Gano, Baden, 
Dudie Archdale, Peter Scott and a dozen others 
whose names I cannot now recall. 

And right in this connection, it was the writer's 
business to handle the publicity work for the 1912 
meeting of the Furniture City Driving Club at Grand 
Rapids and my experience in that capacity is well 
worth recounting. 

The association gave that year, if I remember cor- 
rectly, six early closing events, including the Furni- 
ture Manufacturers' Purse for $10,000 and The ('oni- 
stock Purse for $5,000. A record entry was had in all 
stakes. The big purse received 31 nominations, the 
(irand Rapids Railway Purse 38, and all others iii 
proportion. In my opinion, an early closing entry 
list never presented a better opportunity for some 
glorious publicity work and I set out with a zeal. I 
wrote column after column of dope, so called, and 
after the races were all over and the story told, but 
one horse among the original nominations about 
which I had written came through for me and that 
was none other than Joe Patchen II; but at that he so 
far outclassed the others, he made a terrific joke of 
the Comstock Purse on which we had counted so 
much. Of the 38 nominations received in the Rail- 
way Purse but eight horses scored for the word and 
of these eight not a single one of them was a horse 
that the winter and spring scribes had raved over, 
to any extent. R. T. C. was nominated to start in 
The Alcryon Purse for 2:07 trotters against Dudie 
Archdale and H(>len Stiles. The local folks were 
crazy, so to speak, to see R. T. C. and Dudie hook up 
and I wrote some appetizing tales for th(>m. Result? 
R. T. C. went wrong and did not start; Durfee to win, 
laid up with Helen, which took all the run out of 
Dudie and altogether the race left about the worst 
taste in the mouths of the Grand Rapids race goers 
that they ever experienced. 

But why go on — I believe my readers will see the 
point to the above. Facts, like actions, speak louder 
than words and any time you want to know about 
the value and effects of the early closing events on 
harness racing just delve into your history for a 
minute and you will find enough to suit the most 
fastidious. 

There is still another phase of the situation which 
makes a farce out of the early closer, and that is 
the matter of a 2:05 trotter or a 2:06 pacer racing 
as a green horse through an entire season. If any- 
thing holds the harness turf up to ridicule it is this 
state of affairs. It is high time this iniquity w(>re 
eliminated. Horses should be classed by their money 
winnings or their best record as the season pro- 
gresses. We are living in the dark ages on this prop- 
osition. However this is a subject for another article 
and should not be dwelt upon here. 

During the course of this article I was supposed to 
say something about the good effects of the early 
closing event, on harness racing, but after a very 
careful survey of several years' Grand Circuit racing 
and a close analysis of more than one stake race, I 
cannot see where the early closer has enhanced the 
sport one iota, for try as I will I cannot believe it 
does anything but afford an excellent opportunity for 
the rich man to gamble, a better opportunity for the 
poor man to become a poorer and gives the racing 
association a chance to gather in a bundle of current 
expense money before the meeting starts. 

In order to forestall any criticism that may come 
from those who liappi-n to know that I am interested 
in the promotion of three-year-old futurities, let me 
say riglit here that I do not considiM- our newspaper 
futurities or the colt stakes promoted by the Amer- 
ican Association of Trotting Horse Breeders, in the 
same class with the early closing events as conducted 
by Grand Circuit tracks and minor organizations. For 
several reasons, viz.: 

The same person does not always make all the 
payments through the building of a futurity. 

The payment.s are extremely light and very far 
apart as compared with the payments in the early 
closing events. 

The money eventually raced for. in the colt stakes, 
is always more ii> proportion to what has been paid 
into them, than in the early closing events. For 
example this year's Stallion Slake of the American 
Association of Trotting Horse Breeders was worth 
twelve thousand six hundred and fifty-five dollars 
($12,655) and yet it cost but the small sum of $155 
to start a colt in it and this amount was all payments, 
including the initial and starting fees. Except from 
the third payment to starting fee, all payments were 
a year apart and in some cases the colts changed 
hands, so that the man who made the first payment 
did not make the second, the man who made the sec- 
ond did not make tlie third and the man who made 
the third did not pay the starting fee. 

So that 1 say, while of course a futurity is a jack 
pot, at the same time it cannot be considered in the 
same breath with the average Grand Circuit early 
closing event and subsequent rake-off therefrom. 

Summing it all up. the early closing event is a bad 
proposition for every one connected with the sport, 
except as I hnvi' said, the extremely rich man who 
does not care lor dollars and "sense." It is bad for 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 8, 1916. 



Holiday Time at Hemet Stock Farm 



the middle man because the risk is too great, it i.s 
bad for the association from an advertising stand- 
point and that means getting money at the gate, and 
it is bad from a racing standpoint because we compel 
outclassed horses to race against a stake horse after 
he has shown the ability to do certain things. 

Then there is another reason why it is bad, and 
while this subject ought to be tabooed in many jour- 
nals, I cannot refrain from saying something aboui 
the relation of the early closing event to the specu- 
lation, that is a vital part of our best meetings. There 
always has been and always will be a clamor for 
good prices, especially with relation to the auction 
betting, but we cannot continue the early closers with 
their invariable outstanding horse, and give the bet- 
tors what they ask. This works a hardship two ways. 
First with the bettors and second with the associa- 
tion which counts on a certain revenue from the bet- 
ting. The larger that is of course the larger the 
association's percentage, but "The Favorite Barred" 
sign kills interest, not alone in the racing itself but 
in the speculation, a thing more vital to the sport 
than most of us are willing to concede. 

Well, I guess I have presented my side of the case 
and I now look for the attorney for the defense, who- 
ever he may be. to present his side. I have always 
been taught to believe that there are two sides to 
every story and there may be in this instance, bui, 
as I have said before, after a very careful survey, I 
am at an utter loss to see where, for a long period of 
years, the early closing event has worked anything 
but harm to the harness turf. Would it be too radical 
for me to say that I sincerely believe we are about 
.50 years behind the times because w-e have fostered 
it so long? 

God speed the day when we shall have naught but 
dash races on the harness turf, with practically every 
event an over-night one, or, if you must have early 
closing events, let them expire say a week before any 
meeting opens. Do away with so-called "green" 
horses after they have shown spectacular ability and 
so classify them that, as on the running turf, the 
pelter will have the same chance as a stake horse. 
Put your auction blocks in the attic and equip your 
plants, where they will let you. with mutuel ma- 
chines and put in the National Museum at Washing- 
ton, along with the first locomotive, first automobile 
and many other ancient inventions, the death certifi- 
cate of The Early Closing Event — and proceed to 
forget it. 

o ~ 

1915 A RECORD YEAR. 

Although the official records are not yet at hand, 
lacking which no definite statement can be made so 
far as statistics are concerned, such as the total 
number of race meetings held in the United Stales 
and Canada during the past year, it seems but fitting 
that a brief resume of the activities in the trotting 
world during the past year should be contained in 
this, our last issue of 1915. 

In 1914 the number of race meetings held in the 
United States and Canada was 1,393, which, if we 
are correct, was the greatest total in the history of 
the sport. That this record will be eclipsed when 
the statistics for 191.5 will have been compiled there 
seems little doubt. In New England alone interest 
in the light harness sport was greater than ever 
before, if the number of meetings can be taken as a 
criterion, there having been at least fifteen more than 
in 1914. This seems to have been the rule all over 
the country, and, when the facts are known, we con- 
fidently expect the volume of harness racing to be 
greater than in any other year since the advent of 
the sport. 

The auction sales can best indicate the stability 
of the industry. We have seen prices correspond- 
ingly higher than were paid at the various auctions 
this fall, but. quality considered, it is the consensus 
of opinion that practically every animal that went 
under the hammer brought just about what it was 
worth. Youngsters of fashionable breeding when 
carefully prepared for the auction ring have brought 
prices that were satisfactory in almost every case. 
The fact that five yearlings brought an average of 
$1,730 at the Old Glory Sale, and that the highest 
price for a horse of any age at the recent Chicago 
Sale was paid for a yearling, will furnish food for 
thought. 

The past year has seen, we believe, a greater per- 
centage of available mares bred than ever before. 
The Europan war doubtless was an incentive, as 
breeders could see a better market in the future for 
the by-product. Should the war continue another 
year, more than one million horses will have been 
shipped from our shores, so that 1916 should be 
another banner year for this feature of the indus- 
try. — American Horse Breeder. 

o 

A correspondent writes: "Ventura, with the best 
intentions, had arranged to start this year right with 
a New Year matinee, but owing to a plentiful and 
long continued rain, has postponed the event until 
the first dry Sunday." 

There are still a few substitutions available in 
Pacific Breeders Futurity Stake No. 15, for foals of 
1915, now yearlings. If you have failed to nominate 
your foal of that year, it might be well to lake advan- 
tage now to secure a substitution and thus save 
future regrets. 



Hemet, Cal., Jan. 3, 1916. 

Telegraphic reports to the middle of last week told 
of an inch or so of snow in the region of San Ber- 
nardino and other cities of that general locality, but 
a residence of some years in the heart of the moun- 
tin fastnesses of Southern Montana had robbed a 
snow bank of all its terrors for the writer, so that 
when opportunity presented itself for making a trip 
into the latest haunts of the winter storm king it 
was eagerly taken advantage of, snow or no snow. 
San Francisco herself had been visited by a touch 
of cold weather just prior to my departure, though 
the little freeze had not been attended by a fall of 
"the beauiiful," and the air was simply very stimu- 
lating and invigorating to one who had been used to 
a degree of cold which made the thermometer regis- 
ter much farther down the scale. The first sight of 
snow came Friday morning in the Burbank neighbor- 
hood, but closer in toward the city of all the angels 
all traces of the unaccustomed visitor had been 
removed. It seemed a bit strange to read in a Los 
Angeles paper of a man being treated at one of the 
local hospitals for injuries received in a snowball 
fight, and on the day before my arrival the movie 
folks had been busily engaged in staging "Alaska 
Stuff" on the heights of Hollywood. 

P^rom Los Angeles to Riverside no traces of the 
storm were in evidence save on the peaks in the dis- 
tance, where snow belongs, but from Riverside to 
Hemet I ran into one of the surprises of my short and 
innocent career — seven inches of snow in the Perris 
\'alley. Really, the rolling highlands and the near- 
lying hills presented an appearance that would not 
have been incompatible with a winter landscape in 
the edge of the bad lands in the Dakotas. and here 
again the "opportunists" from Universal City were 
much in evidence. It is only a few short days until 
theater-goers will be gazing in rapt attention at 
thrilling scenes in which snow shoes, fur parkas and 
mukluks, dog teams, and all the other appanages and 
personages of the frozen north will be much in evi- 
dence — all staged and photographed in Sunny South- 
ern California. "It's an ill wind," and so on — and 
the storm certainly played right into the hands and 
pocketbooks of the movie people. Nor did it work 
any great damage to anyone, as the snow itself was 
not detrimental to the fruit and olive orchards, and 
the weather moderated immediately and failed to be 
followed by a freeze of any severity, so that in reality 
the region is juit so much ahead. Between Riverside 
and Hemet there are many thousands of acres of 
barley already sown, and in some instances already 
sprouting, and the impetus given to the growth of 
this crop will assure a bumper harvest, with any 
seasonable moisture at all in the coming months. 

The Hemet Valley, sheltered to a wonderful degree 
by the surrounding hills, received much less snow 
than did the Perris neighborhood, though on Friday 
morning there was enough of the white stuff in evi- 
dence to set the kids — and some of the older folks — 
to throwing snow balls and building snow men just 
like they did "back east," for Hemet has attracted 
a very large percentage of its population from the 
sections across the big divide where winter is a very 
real and appreciably different season from what it is 
in California. To them, the snow came largely in 
the nature of a "letter from home," and they pro- 
ceeded to make the most of it while it lasted, which 
was a very short time indeed. The sun came out 
in its usual style for a good portion of the day, fol- 
lowed by a continued moderation during the night, 
so that within a few short hours the snow line had 
retreated well into the hills, where it will probably 
be contented to remain for the balance of the winter. 
High up on the hoary head and deep scarred sides of 
old San Jacinto the big drifts will linger until well 
into the summer, but it is hardly likely that the 
floor of the valley will receive another covering of 
the kind for many a long month to come. 

Budd Doble, to all appearances younger than when 
he last invaded the . raging Grand with that good 
race trotter, Kinney Lou 2:07%, was on deck to 
greet me as the train pulled into the comfortable 
little city that Mr. W. F. Whittier has placed perma- 
nently and prosperously on the map of the world, and 
after a hasty luncheon at the hotel we made our way 
out to the Hemet Stock Farm, the show place of the 
town and of the community at large. I was no 



stranger to the farm, as it has been nearly three 
years since I first inscribed my signature in the vis- 
itors' book in the office, along with those of many 
better and more widely known men — and ladies, too, 
for that matter, as the place attracts as many of the 
fair sex as it does of the sterner portion of the vis- 
itors to the valley — and it was with a great deal of 
pleasure that I set about renewing my acquaintance 
with both men and horses. 

Wilbur Lou, who brought the establishment so 
much fame in the three years of his career on the 
California and Arizona tracks, I found running in a 
roomy paddock, full of vim and vigor and always 
ready to make new friends from among his visitors, 
as he is one of the nicest tempered fellows imaginable 
and likes to be noticed and played with. It is hardly 
probable that he will again be seen at the races, as 
he was the victim of a bit of hard luck early last 
season, but this is of little moment, as from the 
start he has gotten as a sire this year his services 
will be pretty largely in demand in the future, so 
that his time will be best spent entirely at home. 
No stallion in California, or for that matter in many 
other sections, has had a more auspicious entry to 
the ranks of great sires, and there is every reason 
to believe that this fame will be enhanced every 
season for many, many years to come. Bred to seven 
mares in the spring of his three-year-old form, he 
obtained seven living foals, four of which are in the 
standard list today, while another showed her ability 
to trot in standard time as a two-year-old, while the 
others were never trained for speed. Truly a wonder- 
ful record for a young sire, especially when it is 
further taken into consideration that one of the seven 
is Natalday (2) 2:13%, the best two-year-old futurity 
winning trotter yet produced in California. 

Just at present the youngsters that were raced or 
trained much during the past season are taking 
things pretty easily, running in the alfalfa fields or 
spending much of their time out in the paddocks, 
while the energies of Mr. Doble and his assistants 
are being directed to the breaking of the yearlings 
and the conditioning of some of the older horses that 
had a let-up in 1915. Miss Gailey 2: 11 '4, nicely 
grown and filled out, is taking her work in a very 
pleasing manner and her trainers think that she is 
the making of quite a bit better than a 2:10 trotter 
for her sire, the dead George W. McKinney 2:14%. 
She was a nervous, high strung thing, and the rest 
and added age seems to have benefitted her consid- 
erably. Harry R. (1) 2:24% pacing, also a six-year- 
old, is a nice bodied fellow with a very good way of 
going and considerable speed, as he has a matinee 
record of 2:12% over a two-lap track, gained as a 
three-year-old. All the four-year-olds, including Allie 
Lou, the lass that made such a good campaign for 
the farm this last season, are having a nice easy 
time in view of the hard work that is to come their 
way later on when active speed making commences, 
and are in excellent condition to start in on when the 
time comes. Allie has added a bit of flesh since com- 
ing home and looks fit as a fiddle for another cam- 
paign. Racing in class races against all comers, it 
is hardly likely that as a four-year-old she will pull 
down another eight thousand to be added to the 
Whittier bank account, but she will be there or 
thereabouts when the money is cut at the end of 
the race. 

Of the three-year-olds only two are at present doing 
anything other than playing in the fields and munch- 
ing sweet hay from the feed racks, the "vacationers" 
including Goldsmith Lou (2) 2:29, Fiesta Lou (2) 
2:22% and Gertrude Rives, all by Wilbur Lou, and 
Don de Lopez (2) 2:25 by Kinney de Lopez. Billie 
Boyd (2) 2:30, by Wilbur Lou— Lady Zombro, is 
having his education extended a trifle, and Frank 
Rees is just breaking the recently purchased Ailsie 
Lou, a black filly by Wilbur and out of Bonnie Ailsie 
2:08%, the dam of Contention B. (3) 2:08V4 and the 
trotter Carlschen, who obtained a standard record as 
a two-year-old. Ailsie, I believe, will mature into a 
better individual than either of the two just named 
and should have a profitable amount of speed. Unfor- 
tunately her futurity engagements were allowed to 
lapse before the farm purchased her, so she will not 
be pushed to any great extent until fairly mature. 

The farm has nine foals of 1914, now two-year-olds, 
all staked in the coast classics, and of these the fol- 
lowing quartet are now being handled: Zeta Lucille, 



Saturday, January 8. 1916,] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



Matilda Lou, Wilbur Direct, all by Wilbur Lou and 
out of Zeta W., Lady Zombro and Betsey Direct, 
respectively, and Louise de Lopez by Kinney de Lopez 
and out of Louise Carter, dam of Wilbur Lou and 
several others. With the exception of Matilda Lou 
these babies were handled a bit last spring and 
showed eighths in 17 to 19 seconds before being 
turned out. They are all nice sized and all a uniform 
color, chestnut, with in some instances a very little 
bit of attractive white marking. The other five will 
be taken up in a very short time, and from what I 
saw of them in the pastures and paddocks they are 
of equal Quality with those just mentioned. Once in 
a while Wilbur and Kinney de Lopez get a black 
one, but almost all of their colts are chestnut, witli 
bay the second color. 

Among the yearlings the bays and chestnuts run 
about an even race, and there are eleven of these 
spunky boys and girls being broken, the full crop of 
1915. Nine of them are Wilburs, one is by Kinney 
de Lopez, and the odd one is a chestnut filly by 
Itinaris. As is right and proper for things of this 
age at this season they all have a thick coat of hair, 
but no matter how luxurious this crop gets the qual- 
ity shows from beneath without fail. They are a 
rugged bunch, with nice conformation and good legs 
and feet, and show that they have had all the feed 
needed to insure proper growth at an early age. Not 
a pacer has as yet developed among them and most 
all of them that have gotten along in their lessons to 
the point where they are well bridle wise show nat- 
ural trotting inclinations, so that from among them 
the farm will no doubt develop a few that will give 
a fair account of themselves when their futurity 
engagements roll around to be filled. 

* * * 

While most of the stable room at Hemet is taken 
up by the horses belonging to the farm, there are 
ample accommodations for outside trainers, and a 
few of the latter are usually to be found here at this 
season, as the track is a most excellent one and the 
weather during the training season and late winter 
most conducive to speed making. Lou Taylor, who 
for several years was located either at San Jose or 
Pleasanton, came here last summer when the Hemet 
horses came home from the exposition meeting, and 
seems fixed to stay quite a while longer, indefinitely 
in fact. Lou finished the prep on his two-horse-stable 
here last season and then went out and raced for two 
meetings, winning every race he started in, so nat- 
urally he thinks Hemet a pretty fair place to get 'em 
ready. His trotting filly Luana by Kinney Lou and 
out of a good daughter of Stam B., has not grown 
much since leaving the northern part of the state, 
but has developed into a right good kind of a race 
mare. She is full of spunk and nerve and her legs 
are clean and hard as a real trotter's, so Lou will 
probably figure in some of those races that are hot 
contests thi.s season. For the pacing brigade he still 
has the chestnut gelding by Kinney Lou out of grand 
old Carrie B., the dam of Lovelock and Ray o' Light 
and one or two others, and figures him as a 2:05 per- 
former for 1916 with any kind of luck at all. His 
legs are all to the good and he is a nice headed 
fellow that can be rated and placed wherever wanted, 
which is an absolute essential to real racehorse qual- 
ity. The third member of the Taylor string is the 
two-year-old bay filly by Yoncalla out of Yolanda 
2:liV2 by McKinney, and while she has had but little 
work as yet she has grown nicely and looks to be 
the making of a useful sort of a filly. Lou, since 
going to Hemet, has developed into quite a gasoline 
skinner and he and Mrs. Taylor, with Mr. and Mrs. 
A. L. Blackwell, spend a good deal of time skimming 
over the good roads of the surrounding country. To 
tell the truth Lou has been gadding about a good deal 
of late and rather soldiering on his right-hand man. 
Murphy, who accompanied him on the move south, 
but he promises to get to work right away and be 
ready for the bell when the season opens. The Tay- 
lors and Blackwells are making their home together 
and are mighty comfortably situated. 

* * • 

Bob Sebastian, who preppod a string at Hemet 
last winter and then had a good season down in the 
central west, is spending some time here with his 
people, as Hemet is home for them, and expects to 
go to Omaha about the first of April and take over 
the horses belonging to Thomas Dennison of that 
city, who made numerous friends in California dur- 
ing his visits to the exposition race meetings. Hal 
McKinney, who made two good campaigns for Bob 
on the bull rings of the short grass country, will 



head the pacing division, and there will be a number 
of others to go along with him that will be of the 
hard to beat variety. Bob describes Omaha as the 
coming trotting horse center of that portion of the 
central west, as the folks who are getting into the 
game there are enthusiastic over the outlook and 
have plenty of backing and the public takes to it 
like ducks to water. Hemet he declares to be one of 
the best places in California to prepare for a cam- 
paign, as the climatic conditions are not sufficiently 
unusual ir any way for a change to any ordinary 
country to throw a horse off his form, and his only 
regret is that he hasn't his 1916 stable here now. 
Just at present he is working only one horse, a green 
trotter on which he has an option and which is 
doing everything asked of him so far very handily. 
He is a nicely turned six-year-old chestnut gelding by 
Strathway out of Badger Girl and just before the 
recent break in training weather had negotiated the 
half-mile track here in 2:23 with an eighth in :16'/i- 
If Bob decides that he will do he will take him along 
when he makes the jump to Omaha in the spring. 

The Hemet Stock Farm plant is one of the most 
attractive ones in the west and under the progressive 
policy of Mr. Whittier and the watchful eyes of Budd 
Doble it is kept in the pink of condition for training 
purposes the year round. Within a very short time 
the number of horses in active work here will be 
increased materially, and there is never a day goes 
by that the visiting horseman cannot find much to 
interest him, either on the track, around the comfort- 
' able stables, or out in the paddocks and pastures 
among the loafing horses or the mares and young 
things. Hospitality seems to be the middle name of 
everybody in the valley, and especially of those 
around the farm, and no one can spend a day or a 
number of days here without leaving with a feeling 
of regret. For my part, I am outward bound just as 
soon as I wind up this brief sketch and make a two- 
block run for a train, but I have my mind firmly 
composed on this one point — I am coming back at 
the very first opportunity and stay just as long as 
possible. — [N.] 

• • 

! NOTES and NEWS ! 

• • 

i • 

i t 

g......................... ..........................p 

Anvil 2:02% who is to be in the stud at Pleasan- 
ton this season, has already had a good number of 
excellent mares booked to him. 

Notwithstanding the threatened opposition from the 
Mexican government, the meeting is going on at Tia 
Juana as proposed by the promoters. Nothing further 
has appeared that would indicate governmental 
actio'n to stop racing at this track in the near future. 
«>■«><$> 

Take a few moments off some day or evening and 
drop us a line concerning the colts that you are hand- 
ling this winter, especialfy the ones that have never 
■been in print before. We will appreciate it, and your 
friends will be glad to know what you are doing. 

When Robert A. Smith reached Denver on his way 
home after the Chicago sale, he received a telegram 
that his father had died, and he immediately started 
back to Philadelphia. His many fri(>nds here will 
regret to learn of Mr. Smith's bereavement. On his 
return a m(>eting of the new Pacific Coast Fair Asso- 
ciation will be held. 

Hemet Stock Farm has recently purchased of F. D. 
Myers, formerly a resident of California but now 
living in Pennsylvania, the famous matron Bonnie 
Ailsie 2:08V& by Faustino 2:12>/t and her two filly 
foals by Wilbur Lou (.'<) 2:101/,, one a black three- 
year-old and the other a bay yearling. They are both 
nice individuals and are being broken al i)r(>sent at 
the farm. 

<$>«><?> 

D. W. Waliis, for many years high in the service 
of Miller Lux and until quite recently the general 
cattle superintendent, retired from that firm's service 
the first of the yoar and will assume a less strenuous 
mode of life from now on, making his home in Los 
Banos. Mr. Wallis has some very promising young 
things in the trotter and pacer line and it is an even 
money bet that he will see more of them than 
formerly. 

Every owner of a trotting bred stallion on the 
Pacific Coast is vitally interested in seeing that the 
Pacific P.reeders Futurity Stake No. 16 for foals ol 
1916 is filled with a goodly number of entries. The 
Secretary is sending out letters to stallion owners, 
together with a blank list with the request that 
they send in a list of mares that were bred to 



their .stallion or in their vicinity that might be en 
tered in this stake. If you own a stallion or are inter- 
ested in the preservation and advancement of harness 
racing, don't fail to boost this stake. 

<S><?><S> 

As a result of the hardship of a long trip across 
the continent. Prince Ansel (2) 2:20V6 was in such 
lioor shape that when h(^ was put up at auction at the 
Chicago sale \\o brought less than ?l(io. While it 
was not expected that he would bring a big price on 
account of his age, which is well over twenty years, 
his record as a sire of three world's champions, viz., 
An.selila (1) 2:17%. Verbena Ansel (1) 2:26, and 
Anselot (1) 2:28% made this season, should have 
been taken into consideration and he should have 
brought a much higher price. 

<J><S><» 

There are a lot more horses in training in Califor- 
nia and on the Pacific Coast generally this year than 
most people think, and in view of tlie fact that there 
will be ten or twelve district fairs in California in 
1916. the prospects are better for harness racing 
than they were in 1915, notwithstanding the two big 
meetings at the Exposition. While there was several 
hundred thousand dollars paid o>it in slakes at the 
P. P. 1. E. meetings, most of it went to but a few 
owners. With a lot of small meetings on the coast 
the man who campaigns but one or two horses will 
stand a better show this year, especially as he will 
not be in competition with some of the leading 
Grand Circuit performers. 

<S><S>^ 

After its usual custom Allen Farm, Pittsfield, Mass., 
has just issued its annual publications that go hand 
in hand, the Allen Farm year book and the price 
list. So well is the year book arrang(>d, and so com- 
pletely and carefully is it compiled, that in a very 
few moments one may see all that certain products 
of the farm have accomplished in the' past season, 
and then by turning to the price list he may choose 
the one individual whose blood lines suit him best 
as compared with those of the winners in the year 
book's summaries. By breeding trotters that will 
race and by putting them before the public in this 
form, Allen Farm has established a ready market for 
its products at very fair figures, retaining the middle 
man's commission to put it into an investment in 
printer's ink, which pavs much larger dividends. 
<S><J><S> 

Tia Juana opened on New Year's day as per sched- 
ule with a very pleasing attendance, some six thou- 
sand sport lovers making the trip to the border to 
see the thoroughbreds perform. The early days of 
the meeting have been marked by good racing, 
although the track is not fast nor is the class of 
horses in attendance the absolute pick of the land, 
and if the promoters are able to maintain racing of 
this kind for a few weeks the meeting will receive 
a big boost, draw larger crowds and attract many 
more horses, as numerous owners held oft' from ship- 
ping until they could see how the situation in general 
was going to turn out. Numerous visitors to the 
opening, with whom a repres(>ntative of this publica- 
tion has talked since their return, have nothing but 
a good word to say for the new venture, which is 
pleasing in the extreme. 

At the Meadow Brook Farm, near Pleasaiuon. the 
high wind on Sunday bl(>w down a portion of the 
fence and a number of well bred light harness horses 
strayed from their quarters to the railroad crossing 
where four of them were killed by a passing train. 
The four consisted of a two-year-old black filly by 
True Kinney out of Ida Millerton 2:12'; by Miller- 
ton, recently purchased by Mrs, A, G, Wilkes of 
Francisco for $500. Millard Sanders had this filly in 
training with a view of campaigning her the coming 
season. Tlie other three were yearlings, also from 
the Woodland Stock Farm, and belonged to C. A. 
Harrison, consisting of a bay filly by RobcMM Bingen 
2:ll',i. out of Caritone by Anione: a bay colt by True 
Kinney, out of a Director mare, and a bay colt by 
True Kinney out of Silver Haw (dam of Helen Stiles 
2:06' 1) by Silver Bow, These yearlings were en- 
tered in the Pacific Coast futurity stakes and their 
loss will be a great disappointment to Mr, Harrison. 
<?><S><S> 

A. L, Blackwell. whose former contract with H(>met 
Stock Farm expired a few days ago. is taking things 
easy down at that Southern ('alifornia hamlet while 
waiting to see which way the cat is going to jump. 
If indications point to a good circuit of fairs here 
during the coming season Art prefers to remain in 
California, but if things look the other way about he 
has a nic(> opening waiting for him back in his old 
home in Iowa, with a stable to take to the Great 
Western Circuit. In addition to making a host of 
friends in this state he has also had considerable 
success with his horses, making a nice campaign a 
couple of years ago with the Borden stable and put- 
ting the finishing touches to most of the Hemet 
Slock Farm futurity colts. Allie Lou's winning form 
at both exposition meetings was due to work re- 
ceived almost entirely at his hands and he drove her 
personally in two of the best races she went during 
the entire season, those over the half-mile track at 
Riverside where sh(> forced Virginia Barnette to trot 
in 2: in to win, while in those hot two-year-old races 
at Pleasanton he was separately timed in the trot 
with Don de Lopez in 2:15'/^, and in the pace with 
Fiesta Lou in 2:14'^. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 8, 1916. 



Sires of Hundred or More Performer 

H. T. WHITE. A.MKIUCAN HORSE BREEDEK - — 



Not loiiK a.e;o some account was given in this col- 
umn of the sires that were represented by one hun- 
dred or more trotters and pacers, the idea being to 
show that old-time standards in at least one impor- 
tant branch of the breeding industry must be aban- 
doned. 

When it was announced that Bingara, at the age 
of 14, had become a "centuary" sire, i. e., was repre- 
sented by one hundred standard performers, the 
Breeder printed a list of sires with one hundred or 
more (counting pacers as well as trotters) standard 
performers, and gave the age at which each stallion 
reached the "century" mark. That was an interest- 
ing and instructive tabulation, but it did not show 
which horses were credited with one hundred or more 
trotters. This is a point concerning which the big 
Interest centers, and, having considerable curiosity 
as to what stallions had one hundred or more trotters 
in the standard list, and how old each sire was at the 
time his "century" mark for trotters was reached, I 
went after the information, and present it herewith 
in convenient form for preservation and reference, 
the figures being to the close of 1914. The column 
showing the age at which each member of the list 
reached the "century" mark, as to trotters, is, ot 
course, the meat of the whole matter. In these days, 
when colt stakes run to such large sums and engage 
the attention of breeders far more than any other 
form of racing, the question of how early in his stud 
career a stallion shows his class as a sire is an im- 
portant one. 

The table follows, it being understood that, in the 
case of the older horses, allowance should be made 
for the fact that many of their get were raced to 
high wheel sulkies: 



Born 


Name 


100 Trot'.ers 


Age 


1901 


Ringara 


v.n-, 


14 


1895 


Peter the Great 


I'JU 


18 


1886 


Allerton 


1904 


IS 


1893 


Hingon 


1912 


19 


1893 


Moko 


1914 


21 


1892 


Axworthy 


1913 


21 


1886 


Axtell 


1907 


21 


1876 


Onward 


1897 


22 


1887 


McKinney 


1910 


23 


1880 


Wilton 


1903 


23 


1874 


Ked Wilkes 


1897 


23 


1868 


Electioneer 


1891 


23 


1886 


Prodigal 


1910 


24 


1882 


Baron Wilkes 


1906 


24 


1870 


Nutwood 


1894 


24 


1879 


Pilot Medium 


1904 


2.') 


1876 


Alcantara 


1901 


•J -J 


1881 


(Jambetta Wilkes 


1908 


27 


1879 


Simmons 


1906 


27 


1882 


Elyria 


1910 


2* 


1878 


Jay Bird 


1907 


29 



There you have at a glance a complete view of 
one very important section of the breeding problem, 
the precocity of each member of the list (so far as 
his first generation of descendants are concerned) 
is blazoned forth so that none who reads may escape 
the lesson taught thereby. For example, the first 
seven stallions on the list are to be charged (when 
considering their achievements with those of the bal- 
ance of the company) with the decided advantage of 
having had all their get raced to the bicycle form of 
sulky. The eldest of these seven are Allerton, Prod- 
igal and Axtell, all foaled in 1886, and it is significant 
that the latter has a son, Axworthy, in the distin- 
guished company. 

And that fact suggests another line of investigation 
which at once proves fruitful of good results in the 
matter of instructive facts. Since Allerton (third on 
the list) and Prodigal (thirteenth) also were foaled 
in 1886, they naturally are compared with Axtell as 
to every department in which a sire may excel. Such 
comparison, of course, would be fruitless unless the 
three horses were practically on even terms in the 
matter of opportunity, and it so happens that they 
are about as well matched in this respect as any trio 
that could be selected. Each was given an unusually 
good chance in the stud. Axtell, world's champion 
trotting stallion at three years, with his 2:12 mile to 
high wheels, stood first at a $1,000 fee, and, under 
such cirstances, it is certain none but mares that 
would qualify as matrons under a high standard were 
booked to him. 

Allerton was a great race horse trotter, and, in 
addition, was the first of his sex to beat 2:10 to high 
wheels, and a 2:09% mile at five years was an 
achievement of championship caliber. That Allerton, 
under the shrewd management of C. W. Williams, 
was given a first-class chance in the stud is well 
known, and that he responded nobly to his opportu- 
nity likewise is a matter of common knowledge. He 
is one of three sires that, at the close of 1914, had 
two hundred or more sons and daughters in the 2:. 30 
trotting or 2:25 pacing lists, his score being 264, to 
234 by Gambetta Wilkes, and two hundred by On- 
ward. In other words, in the matter of quantity — 
standard speed alone considered — Allerton stands 
out from all other sires of trotters, and yet his most 
ardent admirers hardly would claim that, in quality, 
he is at the head, because the records (which now 
fairly may be made up in his case) show that he got 
no colt trotters worth talking about, in comparison 
with other sires, and that much the same condition 
exists when the list of great aged trotters, winners 
of important events, is carefully searched from be- 
ginning to end. The one supremely important fea- 
ture which the first generation AUertons lacked was 
class. 



Prodigal is pretty much in the same boat. Started 
on his stud career by Marcus Daly, a man of wealth, 
who himself was a critical judge of bloodlines and of 
possible brood mares (and who was assisted in the 
work by Ed. A. Tipton, a recognized expert in such 
matters). Prodigal had his chance early in life. Later, 
he was owned by Hon. J. W. Bailey, of Texas, who 
was a worthy successor of Daly as a severe judge, 
when brood mares were under consideration, and who 
gave the horse a large band of carefully selected 
mates. Prodigal, like Allerton, is dead, and it is pos- 
sible to judge his career as a whole in a fair and 
intelligent manner. 

What is the outcome of such consideration? Prod- 
igal sired standard speed in tremendous quantities, 
his figures at the close of 1914 being 132 trotters and 
31 pacers, and the precocity of his get was remark- 
able, he at one iime (and possibly now) having more 
2:30 or better two-year-old trotters to his credit than 
any other stallion. And yet, as winners of colt stakes 
(and especially ot important fixtures of that sort), 
the Prodigals do not reach the heights of success at- 
tained by the get of Peter the Great, the Bingens 
(father and sons), or Axworthy. Nor has the Prod- 
igal or the Allerton strain bred on in the male line 
as has the blood of Bingen, Moko, Axworthy and 
Axtell — all, except the last named, being younger 
than either Allerton or Prodigal. These facts are of 
particular interest and value to breeders and horse- 
men because they are part of the history of sires that 
absolutely are at the top in the matter of standard 
speed production, when quantity alone is considered. 
Allerton has no son to compare, in prominence as a 
sire, with Axworthy in the Axtell family, Mobel 
among the Moko tribe, or Todd and Bingara for the 
Bingens; and Prodigal is again in the same boat, 
although, as a sire of broodmares of the top class, 
he is resplendent. In the near future I hope to be 
able to compare the daughters of Allerton, Axtell and 
Prodigal as producers, taking account both of quan- 
tity and quality, and I am sure the facts will contain 
valuable lessons for breeders. 

Three members of the above list — Red Wilkes, On- 
ward and Alcantara — were foaled at approximately 
the same time, so far as the purposes of survey at 
the present day are concerned, their natal years being 
1874, 1875 and 1876, respectively. At thirty years 
from his birth, the work of a stallion that has proven 
himself to be of the top class as a sire, or as a pro- 
genitor, or both is completed, and this trio are close 
together in achievement, to the extent that each has 
accomplished far more than the average trotting sire. 
From my point of view, Onward is decidedly the 
greatest of the lot, but, on this point, the figures to 
the close of 1914 tell the tale concisely and effec- 
tively. Here they are, the trotters, pacers, and speed 
producing sons and daughters of each being shown, 
together with the second generation total: 



Name 


T. 


P. 


Sons 


Dau's. 


2d Gen. 


Onward 


. . . i.")r> 


43 


176 


200 


1324 


Red Wilkes . . 


133 


45 


150 


177 


1323 




121 


54 


80 


99 


695 



A close race indeed, in most particulars, between 
Onward and Red Wilkes, with practically no differ- 
ence (1-1324) as to the number of their second gen- 
eration descendants — not the total of the family with 
the second generation included. In the matter of the 
respective merits of the speed siring sons of Onward 
and Red Wilkes, an inexhaustible supply of food for 
discussion easily may be found, and this state of 
alJairs is made still more plain when one goes care- 
fully over the list of sires by each of the stallions and 
compares them from various points of view, the 
obvious conclusion being that there is, in this re- 
spect, no great difference between the two. In the 
matter of their producing daughters, however, there 
is no question about the superiority of Onward, since 
mares by him have produced 2:10 or better trotters 
(two of which ei'.tered the list at three years), while 
the daughters of Red Wilkes are the dams of but 
four 2:10 or better trotters. The fastest trotter from 
an Onward mare (1914) is Grace 2:04%, and there 
are three that have beaten 2:08, all in races, the 
other two being Czarevna (3) 2:07V4 and Ario Ley- 
burn 2:07V4. The fastest trotter from a daugher of 
Red Wilkes is Gay Audubon 2:06%, and none of the 
other three has a better mark than 2:08Vi, the aver- 
age record of the four being 2:08.6, while that of the 
seven 2:10 list trotters from Onward mares is 2:07.85, 
so that, in every particular, the Onward mares make 
the best showing, to which general statement may 
properly be added the fact that one of those mares 
(Orianna 2:191,4) is the dam of two three-year-old 
trotters that are members of the 2:10 list, Czarevna 
2: 07 ',4 and Grace 2:08, the latter subsequently reduc- 
ing her mark to 2:04%, while Czarevna, having been 
sent to the breeding ranks at four, was not afforded 
an opportunity to show the full measure of her speed. 

The strength of the Alcantara strain, as plainly 
shown by the figures given above, lies in the female 
line, ninety-nine of his daughters having produced 
standard speed, while only eighty of his sons have 
sired it. These dams have produced 117 trotters and 
seventy-four pacers, an average of practically two 
performers per mare, a wonderfully good showing 
when the large number of mares is considered. Al- 
cantara, by the way, is the only sire of one hundred 
or more trotters that has not a single representative 
in the 2:10 trotting list. This unique fact leads one 



to wondering how 


the 


Other sires 


of one hundred or 


more trotters stand in 


respect to 


their 2:10 trotters. 


which information 


will be found 


herewith : 


Sire 2:30 Tr' 


s. 2:10 Tr's. Family 


Allerton 


205 


6 


Wilkes 


Peter the Great 


159 


27 


Happ.v Medium 


Electioneer 


158 


3 


Hambletonian 10 


McKinney 


157 


16 


\V nkes 


On ward 


155 


* 


vv uKes 


lit wood 


137 


1 


Hambletonian 10 


\i \ ti^en 


137 




Electioneer 


Ked Wilkes 


133 




Wilkes 


Prodigal 


132 


4 


Mambrino Chief 


Jay nird 


130 




Wilkes 


Axtell 


129 


6 


Wilkes 


Baron Wilkes 


122 


5 


Wilkes 


Alcantara 


121 





Wilkes 


Axworthy 


116 


11 


Wilkes 


Wilton 


112 


4 


Wilkes 


(iambetta Wilkes 


111 


3 


Wilkes 


Moko 


111 


n 


Wilkes 


Elyria 


109 




Mambrino Chief 


Bingara 


108 


6 


Electioneer 


Pilot Medium 


103 


4 


Hambletonian 10 


Simmons 


101 


2 


Wilkes 


The most cursory examination 


of this list (which 



is based on figures to the close of 1914, Bingara alone 
excepted) shows what the bike sulky has done for 
our best sires in the way of assisting them to pro- 
duce 2:10 trotters, since, of the three stallions that 
have one hundred or more 2:30 trotters and also 
have ten or more in the 2:10 division, not one has a 
performer whose record was taken to high wheels. 
Another noteworthy point is that Nutwood, by odds 
the greatest all around sire of his day (since he at 
one time had more standard performers than any 
other horse, and later achieved a like triumph as a 
sire of broodmares), in the above list, shows the same 
number of 2:30 trotters (137) as Nutwood, but his 
2:10 score is nine. What percentage of the modern 
sire's supremacy is due to the advent of the bike 
sulky and what to the superior speed qualities of 
his get affords a large field for speculation, but the 
question is one that never can be definitely decided. 

Thirteen of the twenty sires in the above list are 
descended Irom George Wilkes and but two from 
Electioneer, and yet the great progenitor of the 
present day (Bingen) is a grandson of Electioneer. 
And, in passing, it will not be amiss to call attention 
to the fact that both George Wilkes and Bingen 
(greatest sire of the Electioneer family) were double 
gaited horses and could pace a streak. Not for argu- 
mentative purposes, because that were a useless 
labor — the arguments go on every winter — but merely 
that what by some people is deemed an important 
(and by all an interesting) similarity in those two 
giants among sires and progenitors may not be over- 
looked. 

Another big fact shown by the above list is that 
the sire who has by far the greatest percentage of 
2:10 trotters — Peter the Great — is neither a Wilkes 
nor an Electioneer, he running in the male line to 
Happy Medium, while, on the female side, the most 
notable strains are those of Pilot Jr. and Sentinel, tht.' 
latter a brother of Volunteer, at one time a leading 
siri>, but who failed as a progenitor. All these facts 
have a bearing on the breeding problem, and con- 
stantly present a live issue in ever-changing form. 
And there is no dodging them by the man who seeks 
to produce a fast colt trotter. It always has been 
the fashion to deride "pedigree fiends," and, no doubt, 
some people, in the pursuit of knowledge about 
horses via the bloodlines route, lose sight of many 
important collateral facts, but, all the same, the 
earnest study and the proper appreciation of blood- 
lines is the foundation of all useful knowledge in 
the matter. 

And. in considering the above table, the important 
fact that plenty of horses that get a considerable 
number of 2:10 trotters do not come within its pre- 
cincts should be remembered. For example, there is 
Bellini whose 1914 figures are seventy-nine trotters, 
and fourteen of them are in the 2:10 list. He does 
not qualify under the "one hundred trotters" test, but 
his percentage of 2:10 trotters is 16.45 per cent., 
compared with 16.98 per cent, for Peter the Great, 
10:19 per cent, by McKinney and 9:48 per cent, by 
Axworthy, the only sires in the above list whose 
2:10 trotters run into double figures. In another 
article, I shall give some account of the sires that, 
lacking one hundred trotters in the list, still have 
gained a creditable position among the sires of 2:10 
trotters. 

o 

A 1,000 POUND FOAL AT 7 MONTHS. 



Pullman Peg','y is a Percheron foal bred and owned 
by Washington State College. She was foaled on 
April 3 and on Nov. 3, the day she was 7 months old, 
she tipped the scales at 1,000 pounds. Occasional 
weighings of the foal showed that on June 2 she 
weighed 439 pounds, on July 12 600 pounds, and on 
Aug. 28 800 pounds. 

Pullman Peggy is not just a chunk of beef; in 
fact, she does not impress one as being fat. She has 
quality combined with substance. Some have com- 
mented upon her as being too heavy for her legs. 
Time alone can verify this opinion. At the present 
time there is not the slightest evidence that she will 
go wrong in her legs. She possesses a clean and 
strong set. She has the flat, flinty bone and the 
large, open hoofhead so characteristic of the Per- 
cherons. She is both stylish and rugged. 

The size of this foal is no doubt the result of judi- 
cious feeding and management. She has been fed in 
a boxstall with her mother and given plenty of exer- 
cise in a large paddock. The dam was fed largely 
on ground oats and bran, with a liberal quantity of 
clover and oat hay. No attempt was made to push 
the foal to early maturity. 



Spturday, January 8, 1916 ] 



THE BREEDER ANL 



SPORTSMAN 



9 



ROD. GUN AND KENNEL 



a 

JOHN X. DcW ITT, for over twenty years editor 
of the Rod, Gun and Kennel deparlnient of the 
Breeder and Sportsman, ended his life early Monday 
evening by shooting himself through the heart with 
a shot gun. This tragic act took place while he was 
alone in the editorial rooms of the Breeder and 
Sportsman early in the evening, and was the result 
of a mind crazed by weeks of suffering from an 
incurable affection of the valves of the heart. It 
was his practice to come to the office and do a por- 
tion of his work after dark, and evidently on this 
occasion he found his suffering more than he could 
bear, as is attested by the following note which he 
left on a table near where the body was found: 

"The past forty-eight hours has been a period 
of distressful torture. My illness seems to grow^ 
worse, and, with other complications coming on, 
even with health partially regained, I see nothing 
encouraging in the future. I'll quit the game for 
good and all. J. X. DeWITT." 

DeWitt had always been a strong, hearty man up 
to within the last six months when his health com- 
menced to fail, he complaining of his stomach and 
heart. Recently he put in three weeks at the Fair- 
mont Hospital and came back to the office on Decem- 
ber 22, apparently considerably better, but this 
improvement did not last. 

DeWitt was one of the best known newspapermen 
in San Francisco, especially among the older contin- 
gency. He was born in this city and except for a 
few years spent in the east, has lived here all his 
lifetime, and was unquestionably one of the best 
informed men on field sports generally of the Pacific 
Coast. He was an ardent angler, hunter, naturalist, 
and an enthusiast on all kindred subjects. He was 
equally at home when writing about field sports or 
actively enjoyin.^ them with the rod or gun. It was 
because of his knowledge and the interesting style 
in which he handled his work, and his personality, 
his conviviality, and good fellowship that he was held 
in high esteem by thousands who follow the pleas- 
ures of the field and stream. 

As a kennel editor and expert he knew the fine 
points of the bench show dogs and took great inter- 
est in the field trials, having attended most of the 
annual trials held near Bakersfield. 

He was a member of the Olympic Club for many 
years and belonged to the Anglers' Club as well as 
the Native Sons. His sad departure from this life 
will be regretted by all who remember him, and no 
one who knows the pain that he suffered with no 
prospect of permanent relief will blame him for tak- 
ing a short cut over the divide to the hereafter, 
where, we all hope, he has found the peace that he 
was seeking. 



DUCK HUNTING IN THE SNOW. 



California hunters had the odd and unique experi- 
ence last week of tramping over snow and ice to 
follow their favorite pastime. Quite a number of 
parties took advantage of the holiday season to travel 
up-state and burn up some smokeless powder. On 
the whole the reports were quite pleasing, limit bags 
as a rule rew^arding their efforts. 

Local conditions, however, remain as unfavorable 
as in the past several weeks. The storm had the 
effect of scattering the birds still farther away and 
the operations on the bay counties' salt marshes were 
practically at a stand-still. Not in years past have 
the bay hunters experienced such poor sport. 

Up around Colusa and the Butte country game 
was reported in abundance. There was from five to 
six inches of snow on the ground and ice formed on 
the still water in the ponds and creeks, but this did 
not seem to interfere with the activities of the wild 
fowl. Ducks and geese were there to feed on the 
extensive rice fields and they stayed around despite 
the white covering on the ground. 

Superior Judges William H. Donohue and T. W. 
Harris together with Frank Roop, Charles Helms and 
Myron Harris of San PYancisco made up a party that 
had some exciting sport at the Colusa Gun Club, but 
spent some hours in reaching their respective homes 
with limit bags. They started out on New Year's 
Day and ran right into the teeth of the terrific storm 
that swept the state. 

Superintendent Fred Watson met the brave hunters 



and had .some (-ntertainnient for their benefit and 
tl)(^n th(>y repaired to the blinds. Mallard were found 
plentiful and some teal and a few canvasbacks were 
brought down. The birds were flying w(>ll and the 
eleven hunters that were at the club did not have 
any trouble bagging the limit. 

The troubles commenced in getting home. A train 
was taken at Colusa at two o'clock on Sunday after- 
noon and they did not reach San Francisco until 6 
o'clock the following morning. The train was held 
up five hours at the Suisun crossing because of the 
high wind and more delay was met later on because 
of flood conditions. It was a tired bunch of hunters, 
but happy with plenty of game. 

A. G. Wilkes and wife enjoyed some good hvinting 
at the Green Head Club near Live Oaks in the 
Buttes. Snow and ice were in evidence but the 
ducks were flying and conditions were rather pleas- 
ant. Both are crack shots and it was no difficult feat 
for each to get a limit bag. 

Down in the Los Banos and Dos Palos country 
there are many ponds and overflows, but for some 
reason or other ducks are rather scarce. Farther 
up the valley, near Newman, Charley Huber and 
Otto Feudner report first class hunting conditions. 

Charles A. (Spide) Baum and Louis Sepulveda, two 
ball players on the San Francisco team, are back 
from a two-months hunting trip into Mendocino 
county and are enthusiastic over hunting and fishing 
prospects. They say mountain and valley quail, 
bear. deer, trout, salmon — black and spring — were 
found in abundance. They traveled a wild country. 

They took a train to Longvale and went in some 
twenty-five miles by stage and foot. The diamond 
stars located at George Lovejoy's ranch and took the 
limit of game and fish while they were in season. 
It's a great trapping country, too, says Baum, who has 
often been dubbed the "boy trapper." 

Baum is trying to work up interest among the base- 
ball players to purchase a tract of land in Mendo- 
cino county and establish a gun club. He expects 
to have everything in readiness by next fall. 

o 

TOM ROUSE'S BEAR STORY. 



"Speaking of bear," said Tom Rouse, as he raked 
a baked potato out of the hot ashes of the campfire, 
"reminds me of the little tussle we had with a big 
grizzly back in the sixties on the east side of the 
Tehachapi mountains." Tom broke his potato in two, 
dug out the salt can from the camp mess and took 
a bite a little too big and so much too hot that he had 
to roll it about for some time before he dared to 
either chew or swallow it. When he at last succeed- 
ed in clearing his mouth, he exclaimed: "Gosh, boys, 
but that was hot, but no hotter than the time we had 
with that bear. Wait till I finish this spud and I'll 
tell you all about it." 

Tom Rouse was an old hunter, and while some- 
times the boys thought he "put a little too much 
risin' in his dough," they still knew that he had an 
enviable record as a bear hunter and carried a few 
unniistakeable scars to bear mute witness to en- 
counters a littli! too close for anyone with less cour- 
age than Tom was known to 'possess. The day's hunt 
had been very unsuccessful and accordingly th(> little 
group around the campfire was rather dull, so Tom's 
promise of a good bear story at once commanded 
attention: for they all knew that when Tom Rouse 
characterized an encounter as a "hot one" it was sure 
to be entertaining. 

After Tom's baked potato was finally stowed away 
and his pipe lighted, he began: 

"If any of you have hunted on the east sid<' of old 
Tehachapi you'll rememb(>r the big rock cliffs. We 
were camped close to the south end of these cliffs, 
just where the wall was broken down with the (>arth- 
quake of 'hi and left those two big leaning rocks in 
the form of a tent. I wasn't there in ',51 but I'm in- 
clined to think that the Indians lied about the earth- 
quake putting those rocks in that shape. My experi- 
ence in San F'rancisco on a certain historic occasion 
was that earthquakes aren't particular about piling 
things up in a useful way, any iiiore'n a bioiwo 
mule is about w hat becomes of you after he has given 
you a broadside from his business end. My belief is 
that them rocks were put in that shape by the good 
Lord for the very purpose of saving Bill Piper's life. 

"Well, there were three of us in the camp, and 
me and Lige Dickens had left Bill Piper to keep 
camp and had gone to look for bear. Lige had gone 
up on tlie ledge of rocks where he could look down 
w^hile I took along the side of the mountain about 
fifty yards below. We had nearly reached the north- 
ern end of the ledge when I heard Lige whistle. I 
looked up to the top of the ledge and there was Lige 
weaving his hand to me to go back as if he was in a 
big hurry about it. I stood still and listened and 
looked ahead of me but I could .neither hear nor see 
anything, while all the tim(> Lige was waving his 
hand frantically for me to fall back. But I was look- 
ing' for bear, and if there were any of 'em near I 
didn't want to retreat without seeing 'em and at least 
getting a shot. The brush was pretty thick and 



about as high as my head so that 1 couldn't see 
more 'n ten or fifteen feet ahead of me, but I wasn't 
going to back out until I knew what was there. Lige 
was about sixty feet above me and some fifty yards 
away and was therefore looking down so he could 
see what was doing. At last when he saw that I 
wasn't going to letreat he called down: "It's two big 
grizzlies — and iluy're not fifteen feet from youl" 

".\t the souiul of Lige's voice I lu^ard a snort and 
the breaking of brush right in front of nie. I mad«> a 
jump to get behind a clump of brush, but my foot 
caught in a vine or something of the kind and I was 
just falling beyond the brush when the end of the 
nos(> of one of the bears hit me in the side and 
knocked me ch^an out of his w-ay and over against 
the dead brancliei- of a fallen tree. Maybe you think 
I wasn't scared. Well, I was, but not half so much 
as that bear. The two of them had been waddling 
along leisurely up to the time Lige called me. His 
voice scared them and they broke into a run, not 
knowing that I was right in front of 'em, so that 
when I tripped and fell before the leader just in 
time to be cau!;ht by his nose he didn't realize what 
he had run into, and hadn't time to stop to investi- 
gate, but went tearing through the brush, snorting 
at every jump. As soon as they had passed me, and 
before I had extricated myself from the dead tree 
and recovered my rifle, I heard Lige shoot. Our guns 
in those days were muzzle loaders and of course he 
had but the one shot and the bears went on. 

"As soon as I had assured him that I was not hurt 
Lige began reloading, telling me not to follow them 
too close as I would have no show with them in such 
thick brush. After reloading he followed along the 
ledge, while I had no difficulty in following their trail 
from below, which was taking a direct course for our 
camp. Every minute or two I would look up to 
Lige —who was now keeping pretty well out of sight 
— for directions as to where and how far the bears 
were ahead of me. A grizzly never runs far at a 
time, when he does run; and he never runs when he 
thinks he is in close quarters and can see his adver- 
sary, and very seldom after he is wounded, unless 
it's after the fellow who did it, so I expected any 
moment to come onto them. 

"When I had been so unceremoniously knocked 
out of the way i didn't have time to see how big the 
brute was but Lige said one of them was a monster, 
and this being the case I didn't propose to let him 
get away, so 1 kept following 'em up pretty close. We 
had got to within less than two hundred yards of the 
camp when Lige motioned that they were right in 
front of me. W hile I was working up cautiously Lige 
raised his rifle and fired. At the crack of his rifle 
I again heard the brush snapping and rushed up to 
get a shot at them myself. But the brush at this 
point was considerably higher than my head and 
quite thick, so it was difficult to see any distance 
at all. At the same time Bill Piper rushed out from 
the camp, calling to know w-hat was up. Lige hal- 
looed to him to get back out of sight, that the bear 
was coming right toward him. Just at this the big 
fellow' broke into the open where our camp was locat- 
ed, and seeing Pill made straight for him. Bill drew 
a bead but failed to stop iiim. I tore through the 
brush as best I could and reached the open just in 
time to see Bill running around the rock tent with a 
fifteen hundred pound bear not more than ten feet 
behind him. 

"The two leaning rocks that formed the tent were 
close up to the perpendicular ledge, and a lot of other 
rocks in falling had piled up between them so as to 
form a high connection with the ledge. Over this 
Bill came scrambling as fast as he could and down 
the side toward me with th(> bear too close a s<'cond 
for Bill's peace of mind. "Go round again I' I yelled 
as I fired at the bear's throat over Bill's head. My 
shot hit him hard in the sticking place and he half 
rolhnl down to the level ground. As he rocovered 
liis feet and made after Bill I called to Lige to look 
out for him as he came over again, and drawing my 
revolver rushed up to close quarters. In less time 
than it takes to tell it I saw Bill coming over this 
course on the second lap. Lige had reached a point 
not more than ten feet from the hurdle over which 
they were coming and nearly above them, and I had 
gained a rock within six feet of the course. On 
account of the bear 'tumbling from my shot Bill 
had gained a lend of fully twenty f(>et, and the bear, 
weaken(>d from the three good shots that were now 
in him, wasn't taking the hurdle as clean as he did 
on the first lap. As Bill came over I called to him, 
saying: 'Keep it up. Bill I If you gain as much the 
next lap as you have on this you'll have him by the 
tail.' As th(> bear appeared Lige caught him with a 
good shot from above in the neck, while I, reaching 
to within four f( et of liis ear, directed my fire for 
the brain and he went down like a felled ox, hitting 
the ground at the bottom of the rocks with such a 
thud that further shooting was unnecessary. Billy, 
however, had taken my advice and came over the 
hurdle for the third lap with such a rush Ihf.t he 
almost landed on the dead bear, while Lige, from his 
perch on the cliff, called out: 'Bill wins in the tliird 
round; time, one minute and twenty-seven seconds.'" 

As Tom seemed to have finished his story and be- 
gan raking in the ashes again, one of the boys asked: 

"What becanT? of the other bear?" 

"Oh," said Tom, "the little fellow kept right on 
when the big one took after Bill. As soon as Bill 
had recovered his wind we all three took his trail 
and got him within less than half a mile of the camp. 
But that's another story," he said, as he raked 
another potato cut of the Are, "and I'm not going to 
let this spud burn for the .sake of a young grizzly 
that didn't weigh more'n five hundred pounds." 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



(Saturday, January 8, 1916. 



FIELD TRIALS AT BAKERSFIELD. 



Conditions were most propitious for the thirty- 
third event of the Pacific Coast Frield Trial Club. 
The weather was perfect, the dogs were in fine fettle, 
the ground just ripe from recent rains to hold the 
.<>'cnt, and the cover in most places excellent. The 
attendance wa.s good althou.ah only a few of the Old 
Guard were present. Among the new enthusiasts 
was Mrs. A. G. Wilkes who enjoyed the test of long 
heats, riding horses of dilTerent ages and disposi- 
tions. She was there at the finish each time and 
enjoyed the sport immensely. She knows a good 
dog, too. and is an impartial judge. 

The judging at the trials was done by John Schu- 
macher and Walter Scott, whose decisions generally 
gave satisfaction. 

At the annual meeting of the association the fol- 
lowing officers were elected: President, A. G. 
Wilkes, San Francisco; first vice-president, John 
Schumacher, os LAngeles; second vice-president, 
John Flynn, San Francisco; third vice-president, 
J. Waller Scott, San Francisco: secretary and treas- 
urer, S. Christenson, San Francisco; executive board, 
J. S. French, J. Walter Scott, J. A. Chanslor, Phil 
Wand and Martin I. Smith. 

The date of next year's trials was considered and 
if conditions are favorable they will be held the sec- 
ond week in December. 

Devotees of field trials had the pleasure of seeing 
a private exhibition of moving pictures of the events 
sta.ged at Bakersfield. It was the first time that 
the Pacific Coast Field Trial Club has had moving 
pictures taken of their contests and the clear vision 
of the star setters and pointers in action afforded a 
deal of pleasure to the fanciers. 

Those present at the exhibition were President 
A. G. Wilkes, secretary-treasurer S. Christenson, J. 
A. Chanslor, John W. Considine, J. S. French, Wil- 
liam S. Tevis, Lansing Tevis and A. Walter Scott. 
The trials this season were pronounced the best in 
tlie history of the organization. Birds were plentiful 
and the ground in excellent shape for the dogs to 
work. 

Summaries. 

December 16— ANNUAL DERBY, open to pointers 
and setters whelped on or after January 1, 1914. 
Twelve starters, ten English setters and two pointers. 
Blue Gladerigo, blue belton setter dog, by Old For- 
ester — Dixie Chase. Joseph Canslor, owner; W. B. 
Coutts, handler. 

With 

Willing Actor, white, black and tan setter dog, by 

Western Boy — Bessie Whitestone. Wilkes & Avery, 

owners; Roy Avery, handler. 
Freebooter, white, black and tan setter dog, by Free 

Lance — Lighthcart. S. Christenson, owner; W. B. 

Coutts, handler. 

With 

Kenwood Beauty, white, black and tan setter bitch, 
by Melrose Dude — Caesar's Keepsake. Joseph 
Chanslor, owner; Fred Coutts, handler. 

Kenwood Fan. white, black and tan setter bitch, by 
Melrose Dude — Caesar's Keepsake. W. B. Coutts, 
agent and handler. 

With 

Luana, white, black and tan setter bitch, by Western 
Boy — Bessie Whitestone. Jack McKee, owner and 
handler. 

Kenwood Rock, white, black and tan setter dog, by 
Old Forester — Caesar's Keepsake. L. Titus, owner; 
W. B. Coutts, handler. 

With 

Rod Gladerigo, white, black and tan setter dog. by 

Old Forester — Dixie Chase. Avery & Wilkes, 

owners; Roy Avery, handler. 
Babe, white, black and tan pointer bitch, by Ladess 

of Stockdale — Doctor's Daughter. Dr. Brown, 

owner; T. C. Dodge, handler. 

With 

Kenwood Sam, white, black and tan setter dog, by 

Old Forester — Caesar's Keepsake. Mrs. A. G. 

Wilkes, owner; Fred Coutts, handler. 
Woodrow Gladeri.go, blue belton setter dog, by Old 

Forester — Dixie Chase. J. S. French, owner; Ray 

Avery, handler. 

With 

Del Rey Kee, black and white bitch, by Deuce II — 
Anna Dee. M. I. Smith, owner; Fred Coutts, hand- 
ler. 

n. 

Rod Gladerigo with Kenwood Sam. 
Woodrow Gladerigo with Kenwood Fan. 
Kenwood Beauty with Del Rey Dee. 

Result. 

1st — Kenwood Sam. 2nd — Del Rey Dee. 3rd— 
Kenwood Beauty. 

December 17— ALL-AGE STAKE, open to all point- 
ers and setters. Ten starters, all English setters. 
St. Ives, white, black and ticked setter dog, by Uncle 

Jimmie Whitestone — Belle Fontaine. H. S. Russ, 

owner; W. B. Coutts, handler. 

With 

Melrose Rod, white, black and tan setter dog, by 

Melrose Dude — Caesar's Keepsake. W. B. Coutts, 

agent and handler. 
Shasta Maid, white, black and tan setter bitch, by 

Bohemian Prince — Shasta Queen. Frank Ruhstal- 

ler, owner; Fred Coutts, handler. 

With 

Dixie Chase, blue belton setter bitch, by Sven C — 
Blue Bonnet. J. S. French, owner; A. J. Wilkes, 
handler. 

Melrose Dude, white, black and tan setter dog. by 



Melrose Prince — Kil's Jessie. Mrs. A. G. Wilkes, 
owner; Roy Avery, handler. 

With 

Orange Blossom, white and orange setter bitch, by 
Bohemian Prince — Peach Nugget. S. Christenson, 
owner: Fred Coutts, handler. 

Old Forester, blue belton setter dog, by Count White- 
stone — Barter's Cleopatra. Joseph Chanslor, owner; 
Fred Coutts, handler. 

With 

Terry, white, black and tan setter dog, by Melrose 
Dude — Caesar's Keepsake. Joseph Terry, owner; 
\V. B. Coutts, handler. 

K(>nwood Beauty, white, black and tan setter bitch, 
by Melrose Dude— Caesar's Keepsake. Joseph 
Chanslor, owner; Fred Coutts, handler. 

With 

Melrose Chief, white, black and tan setter dog, by 
Melrose Dude — Caesar's Keepsake. J. W. Consi- 
dine, owner; W. B. Coutts, handler. 

IL 

Orange Blossom with Shasta Maid. 
Melrose Dude with Melrose Chief. 

Result. 

1st- -Melrose Dude. 2nd — Orange Blossom. 3rd — 
Shasta Maid. 

December 19— MEMBERS' STAKE, open to point- 
ers and setters owned and handled by members. Five 
starters, three pointers and two English setters. 
Peach Nugget, white and orange setter bitch, by 
Count Whitestone — Peach Blossom. S. Christen- 
son, owner and handler. 

With 

Saddle, white and black pointer dog, by Ladas of 
Stockdale — Blue Ribbon. Lansing Tevis, owner 
and handler. 

Wilson, white and orange pointer dog, by Rexall — 
Hoosier Girl. Dr. Brown, owner and handler. 
With 

Del Rey Flash, white and liver pointer dog, by Dooley 
- -Del Rey Rose. Martin Smith, Jr., owner and 
handler. 

Dixie Chase, blue belton setter bitch, by Sven C — 
Blue Bonnet, a bye. J. S. French, owner; A. J. 
Wilkes, handler. 

Result. 

1st— Dixie Chase. 2d— Wilson. 3d— Del Rey Flash. 

o 

NATIONAL SPORTSMEN'S SHOW. 



The Sportsman's Review of the current month 
calls attention to the coming exposition of sports 
to be held in Madison Square Garden, New York, and 

says : 

"When the Wild will be calling loudest, in mid- 
March, American sportsmen will rally at the 1916 
National Sportsmen's Show at Madison Square Gar- 
den. The coming event will be unusually interesting 
for various reasons, including the fact that it will 
mark the twenty-first year of Sportsmen's shows, 
wliich wore begun in May. 1895, at the Garden. These 
annual exhibitions are held by the National Sports- 
men's Show Corporation, under the auspices and ap- 
probation of the National Sportsmen's Association, 
Inc. The managers are Captain J. A. H. Dressel and 
Allen S. Williams. Captain Dressel is the founder 
of these shows. The president of the association is 
Mr. W. H. Allen, of Penniac, New Brunswick, and 
the association is almost as strong in Canada as in 
the United States. 

"The coming show will open March 15 and close 
March 22. Besides the usual commercial exhibits of 
sportsmen's arms, ammunition and general equip- 
ment for all outers there will be picturesque and 
panoramic exhibits representing sportsmen's para- 
dises in Wyoming. Montana, the Adirondacks, Maine, 
Florida, Virginia, Louisiana, Long Island, the British 
Northwest and Canadian provinces of Ontario, Que- 
bec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. An extensive 
exhibit of big game trophies will represent Africa. 

"Guides will appear at the show in greater number 
than ever before. These pilots of the forest will bring 
with them pine trees, their log cabins, canoes, snow 
shoes and other paraphernalia, and within their ex- 
hibit spaces will practice their handicraft, ranging 
from making moose calls to tying flies which will 
beguile the wiliest trout. These hardy game scouts 
with their woodsy environment and lore of the trail 
make the strongest appeal to the ardent hunter and 
angler of any feature of the show. 

"The center of the arena floor of the Garden will 
be a lake in which will float canoes, duck boats and 
hunters' motor boats. In the water will swim live 
fish, to interest the young folks, who will be glad 
to meet friendly Indians in beads, buckskin and 
feathers, who will give 'the children free rides in 
birchbark canoes around the lake, affording the young 
voyagers opportunities to inspect at close range rare 
wild aquatic birds domiciled on an island in the 
lake's center. 

"With no intent to take the wind out of the sails 
of the circus which will take possession of the Gar- 
den when the sportsmen leave it, the show will have 
its own menagerie of wild animals, live game, game 
birds, game fish and interesting specimens. The 
New Brunswick guides are going to bring a moose as 
their mascot, and Ambler D. Moncure from the Blue 
Ridge Mountains of Virginia, will exhibit in his char- 
acteristic hunters' retreat, some tame non-venomous 
snakes along with pet possums and baby bears. 

"In the Concert Hall of the Garden will be confer- 
ences of conservationists, lectures with lantern slides 
and motion pictures illustrating fishing, hunting, 
camping and forestry and other special attractions." 



ENORMOUS OUTPUT OF FISH EGGS AT THE 
GREAT LAKES HATCHERIES. 



According to the Government report made public 
on the 30th of December, the Great Lakes fish hatch- 
eries accomplished satisfactory results with commer- 
cial fish this year, as evidenced by the annual report 
of ITnited States Fish Commissioner H. M. Smith. 

"Although storms and sudden ice formation ham- 
pered fishing operations during the spawning sea- 
son," reports Mr. Smith, "yet the losses in some fields 
were in most instances compensated for by unusual 
success in others, and the final outcome of the col- 
lecting season was an aggregate of 1,843,49.'.540 eggs 
of all species handled as compared with 1,634,591,880 
during the corresponding season of 1914. 

"The egg collections of only one species, the com- 
mon whiteflsh, fell behind those of the previous year, 
the total shortage in this instance amounting to 
about 42,000,000. 

"The take of lake trout eggs, on the other band, 
was more than 8,000,000 in excess of that in 1914 and 
there was a small gain in the collection of pike-perch 
eggs over last year. 

"The whiteflsh propagation in Lake Erie was sat- 
isfactory. A scarcity of fish occurred in the Put-In- 
Bay field, and there was a shortage in the catch at 
Monroe piers, owing to the destruction of fishermen's 
nets by floating ice fields at the height of the spawn- 
ing season. 

"The take of eggs in all other fields in this lake 
was greater than ever before and the yield from 
some of them was twice that of the preceding year. 

"While the aggregate egg collections, amounting 
to 479,290,000, were nearly 10,000,000 less than in 
1914, their quality was so good that there was a 
decided increase in the white-fish output of the Put- 
In-Bay station. 

"Notwithstanding the fairly good results obtained 
with the pike-perch in Lake Erie, as regards both 
quality of eggs and number taken, the collection 
period was the shortest ever known in Lake Erie." 

o 

HEARING ON FISH SCREENS. 



The subject of placing fish screens in the irriga- 
tion ditches, a conservation measure passed by the 
State Legislature in 1915, has been having a hearing 
before Carl Westerfeldt, a member of the State Fish 
and Game Commission, in the office of Andy Fergu- 
son, at Fresno this week. 

Under the provisions of the new law, the irrigation 
companies are given the privilege of having a hear- 
ing and of introducing whatever evidence they may 
wish and of hearin.g evidence from the commission. 
The action taken by the Fresno County canal owners 
to bring the matter to a hearing is the first of its 
kind in the state. The screens are provided as a 
measure of preventing the loss of thousands of fish 
each year. 

The companies which were represented at the 
hearing were the Turner Ditch Co.; Reed Ditch Co.: 
Riverdale Ditch Co.; Stinson Canal and Irrigation 
Co.; Kings River and Fresno Canal Co., and the Em- 
igrant Ditch Co., owners of these canals supplying 
practically all the irrigation waters used in the 
county of Fresno. The companies were represented 
by Short & Sunderland and the Fish and Game Com- 
mission by their attorney. R. D. Duke of San Fran- 
cisco. A. E. Culver, of the State Hatchery Depart- 
ment, under whose direction is the enforcement of 
the new law, also attended the hearing. 

Thousands of screens have been placed in canals 
through out the northern part of the state. Final 
decision regarding the directions for the placing of 
these screens in the ditches of Fresno county will 
be made by Commissioner Westerfeldt after the evi- 
dence introduced at the hearing has been received. 

These screens must be provided at the intake or 
mill race of irrigating ditches, pipes, flumes or canals 
as directed by the. commission. Practically all the 
power companies of the state have complied with the 
provisions. They must be of the fineness and quality 
that will prevent the passing of all fish from river, 
creek or lake from which the canals conduct their 
water. 

"The law has not been enforced in the past because 
of the lack of a screen that would serve the purpose 
and at the same time not interfere with the flow of 
the water," a member of the Fish and Game Com- 
mission said. "But now that there has been invented 
several screens that serve the purpose the law will 
be strictly carried out. This safeguard will result 
in the saving of fish in large quantities." 

o 

Michael J. Connell. Fish and Game Commissioner 
of Los Angeles, reports that there is to be expended 
$50,000 this year in permanently improving southern 
California sporting conditions. Under the supervis- 
ion of William H. Shebley, State Superintendent of 
Hatcheries, a large modern hatchery will be located 
in the Sierras in Inyo county, either at Independence 
or Lone Pine. The hatchery will have cement floors 
and the installations throughout will be of the best. 
Superintendent Shebley has been given authority to 
expend as much as $30,000 on the hatchery, which 
will have a capacity to stock all southern California 
streams and lakes beyond anything attempted here- 
tofore. A new patrol boat with a speed of fifteen 
knots will be built in Los Angeles, plans having been 
drawn for such a boat, to be in charge of the Game 
Commission. 



Saturday, January 8. 1916.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



San Jose Club Braves Rain. — Despite a 40-mile 
gale, accompanied by rain, a little bunch of marks- 
men attended the regular shoot of San Jose Rifle 
and Pistol Club near Alum Rock Park. Six intrepid 
shooters started, but only two finished. Carroll and 
Knobel shot it out in the storm for three hours, Car- 
roll winnins out by only one point. The result: 

Carroll, high gun, with 417. 

Knobel, second hi.ah .sun, with 416. 

First best shot, Knobel 22; last best shot, Knobel 
24: sharpshooter, Carroll 25. 

Scores: Carroll 211—206: Knobel 210—206. 

McGlynn. Carroll and Knobel shot a contest with 
pistols, 25 shots each, at 20 yards, McGlynn winning 
handily, the scores of each' being 198, 189, 186 re- 
spectively. 

A very handsome trophy offered by William Gilbert 
was to have been shot for Sunday, but owing to the 
bad weather the match was postponed until the 
regular shoot on the 16th of this month. 

Miss Hammond and Mrs. Riley Winners of the 
Diana Trophy. — The shoot of the Nemours (Ladies') 
Trapshooting Club for the Diana Trophy Contest, 
which has been running since October 7, closed De- 
cember 30. This contest was arranged by Mr. Ellwood 
A. Davis of the Millard F. Davis Company and Mr. 
W. M. Hammond of the Hercules Powder Company. 
Mr. Davis gave a beautiful sterling silver vase for 
high scratch score covering the ten shoots that the 
contestants were obliged to make between October 
7 and December 30, and Mr. Hammond gave a vase 
of the same style for high handicap score covering 
the same number of shoots. 

At the close of the contest yesterday, when scores 
were compiled it was found that Miss Harriet Ham- 
mond had made the highest scratch score, having a 
total of 188 actual breaks to her credit. When it 
came to handicap scores Mrs. E. L. Riley was in the 
lead, her actual number of breaks with her added 
targets giving her a total of 186. The ladies are very 
proud of their trophies which are beautifully en- 
graved and have the monogram of the club on them. 

The spoon event was also won by Mrs. Riley, who 
with her handicap scored on more break than Miss 
Hammond. Scores (25 targets) follow: 

Score. Hdc. Total. 

Miss Hammond 18 18 

Mrs. Riley 15 4 19 

* * S: 

High Averages. — High Professional average at In- 
dianapolis, Ind., Nov. 23, w'as won by Mr. F. K. East- 
man, who scored 142 ex 150 with Peters "steel where 
steel belongs" shells. 

At Miamisburg, Ohio, Nov. 25, high ameteur aver- 
age was won by Mr. Ed. Cain of Dayton, 95 ex 100, 
closely followed by Ike Brandenburg of Dayton, 93 
ex 100, both using Peters shells. Mr. C. A. Young 
of Springfield cleaned up the program of 100 straight 
without a miss, also with the "P" brand. 

High amateur and general high averages at Dallas, 
Texas, Nov. 25, were won by Mr. W. H. Bertrand of 
Dallas, 130 ex 150; Mr. Phil. Miller was second with 
129, and Mr. S. L. Hassell, Jr., third, 127, all using 
Peters factory loaded shells. 

At the St. Thomas, Ont., tournament, Nov. 29, Dec. 
1, the most important tournament of the latter part 
of the 1915 season, Mr. Rolla Heikes, shooting Peters 
shells, won high professional and high general aver- 
ages, shooting almost continuously in a blizzard, his 
score being 385 ex 400. Another shooting record of 
even greater merit was the winning of the Grand In- 
ternational Handicap by Mr. W. J. McCance, captain 
of the St. Thomas Gun Club, by the fine score of 96 
ex 100. Mr. McCance also shot Peters "steel where 
steel belongs" shells. 

o 

CHANGE RULES FOR RIFLE TOURNAMENT. 



Washington, Dec. 30. — Rules for the 1916 national 
rifle matches have been drafted by a committee ap- 
pointed to formulate them for consideration of the 
board for the promotion of rifle practice, which will 
meet here Jan. 13 for its annual session. The com- 
mittee was composed of Gen. Spencer, New Jersey 
National CUiard, chairman; Gen. Drain, Washington 
National Guard; Capt. Shindel, U. S. A., and Capt. 
Harlee, marine corps. The suggested changes of 
rules were made public today by the war department 
and are in substance as follows: 

To substitute for the present method of division of 
teams by standing into three classes with trophies 
and prizes for each class, a Class A, B and C division 
on standing, the first of the state teams to form the 
first class, the next fifteen the second and the re- 
maining teams the third. Class A team members 
would receive gold medals. Class B silver and (Mass 
C bronze. Cash prizes would be dispensed with in 
the national matches. 

Teams from the army, navy and marine corps and 
also from schools and colleges would be added to the 
various classes according to standing, a single trophy 
to be awarded to the highest United States service 
team and a single trophy to the highest school or 
college team. The highest score team of the trophy 
winners would be awarded the national trophy, the 
second team the Hilton trophy and the third team 
the bronze Soldier of Marathon trophy. 

The committee suggests that the coast artillery be 
represented by a team and that officers with the rank 
of major be admitted to the competition as team 
captains, previous regulations having excluded grades 
above captain. 



A general revision of rules governing pistol 
matches is recommended and it is proposed that 
the number of cash prizes be increased in the na- 
tional individual matches. 

The board will decide at its January meeting the 
|)lace of the 1916 matches. 

o 

ELKS' TEETH NOT EMBLEMATICAL. 



Dr. Ralph Hagan, President of the California Elks 
State Reunion Association, takes exception to the fol- 
lowing article vhich appeared in the Breeder and 
Sportsman on January 1st: 

Underground Elk Dentistry. — A curious fact 
was dt^vclopcd in the recent round-up of elk at 
Hullonwillow. in Kern county, none other than 
Ihal the teeth or tusks of the bull elk were uni- 
formly missing. These teeth, as is w(>ll known, 
are prized as charms by members of the Order 
of Elks and therefore have a commercial value. 
The teeth are not used or needed for mastica- 
tion by the animals and it is said that at a previ- 
ous round-up many elk were roped and the teeth 
extracted. Also, the story goes, that vaqtieros 
have fre(|uentl> lassoed the animals and pulled 
the teeth. In any event, of some fifty bull elks 
examined, none had the usual teeth and presum- 
ably many a member of the B. P. O. E. is wear- 
in an elk tooth charm at the expense of the ant- 
lered herd at Duttonwillow. 

His statement regarding the matter will be seen 
below : 

"Los Angeles, Cal., Jan. 4, 1916. 
"Editor Breeder and Sportsman, 

"San Francisco, Cal. 
"Dear Sir: 

"I note the enclosed article in the Jan. 1st issue of 
your paper and desire that you be placed right in 
the matter. 

"The National Order of Elks is a benevolent and 
charitable organization and not one of a barbarous 
nature as you would lead your readers to believe. 
Some years ago our Order went on record condemn- 
ing the use of the elk tooth by our members and at 
the same time took the matter up with our govern- 
ment and arranged to have the herds of American 
elks fed and cared for as much as possible during 
the long cold winters. The elk tooth in question is 
not in any way emblematic of our Order and may be 
worn by any person who desires an ornament, if the 
same may be classed as such. 

"I sincerely hope you will see fit to right your 
readers in this matter. 

"Respectfully yours, 

"RALPH HAGAN." 

o 

NATION MAY ENTER SEALSKIN TRADE. 



Secretary William C. Redfield of the Department 
of Commerce, in his annual report says that the 
Government is considering plans to dispose of more 
than 3,000 sealskins which are now held in cold 
storage. It is suggested that the Government may 
have the skins dressed and dyed in this country, 
bringing here an industry which before the Euro- 
pean war flourished abroad. In discussing the ques- 
tion. Secretary Redfield says: 

"In February, 1915, Congress, by joint resolution, 
authorized the Secretary of Commerce to postpone 
the sale of sealskins then in his possession to such 
time as he might deem advisable. Under the law as 
it existed theretofore, the annual sale of sealskins 
was required. In the unsettled state of the interna- 
tional fur market, arising from the European war, 
a material loss in revenue would have resulted had 
the .sale been forced during the past fiscal year. 

"There are now in cold storage 3,290 sealskins, to 
which should be added the number taken from ani- 
mals slaughtered during the summer season of 1915. 
If war conditions continue so as to close international 
markets, it may be necessary to poslpon(> the sale of 
the skins taken this season as was done last year. 

"The department has under consideration, however, 
a plan whereby all of these raw skins, those taken 
both in 1914 and 1915, may be dressed and dyed in 
this country by the best process known anywhere for 
the purpose and not hitherto used in this cotmtry, 
which would result not only in saving the skins from 
any possible deterioration in storage but would jier- 
mit their sale as fvilly dressed and dyed furs of the 
best quality at prices remunerative to the fJovern- 
ment. This would save the purchasers the cost of 
shipment to Great Britain for dyeing and dressing, 
as heretofore has been necessary, the expense of 
reshipment to this country, and the duly heretofore 
imposed upon Ihetn when so reshii)ped. 

"The I'esult of this arrangement would be to put 
into American control the entire process from begin- 
ning to end, to bring to this country an industry not 
existing here before, and to save upon this valuable 
product a large amoimt of tmnecessary expense which 
has hitherto been imposed thereon by reason of our 
dependence upon a foreign source for dyeing and 
dressing. 

"When commercial killing of fur seals shall be 
renewed — and the rapid growth of the herd will make 
that soon both possible and desirable- other prod- 
ucts of that herd than the fur skins shotild have a 
consideration which has never been given them. The 
seal carcasses contain materials of economic value 
which have hitherto been wasted and which are far 
beyond the power of the native community to utilize. 
The department is giving the profitable utilization 
of seal meat and refuse careful thought." 



PROGRESS ON JOHN MUIR TRAIL. 



Work on the John Muir Trail, in the High Sierras, 
which is being built by co-operation between the 
Slate and the Forest Service, has suspended for the 
season and reports as to the results accomplished 
ha\e been received from the Forest Supervisors who 
had charge of the work on the Sierra and the Sequoia 
National Forests. 

Tw(»nty-one miles of new trail were constructed, 
two and one-lialf miles of old trail were repaired, and 
one bridge built. 

The trail has a minimum tread of thirty inches, 
with plenty of turnouts in dangerous places, and the 
grade, except in a few stretches, was kept below 
fifteen per cent. Where grading work was done, 
ample clearance was made for packs, and in timber 
country six feel clearance between trees was ob- 
tained. All prominent trees along the trail were 
blazed with the Forest Service blaze, and above 
limber-line monuments of large size were placed at 
frequent intervals. 

The total cost of the work done last summer was 
$4,733.49— or about .$200 per mile. Portions of the 
trail were hewn through solid granite, and cost at the 
rate of .$2300 per mile. The work was done by the 
Forest Service under the direction of the State Engi- 
neer. 

When completed the trail will furnish a practicable 
saddle route from the Yosemite to Mount Whitney 
through the High Sierras. 

o • 

RAIN SPOILS ANGLING, 



The heavy rain and storm played havoc with fish- 
ing conditions. With prospects bright for some good 
steelhead angling on the Russian River the downpour 
came along and swelled the stream to overflowing. 
It is doubtful if the river will clear enough to permit 
the sport before the season closes. 

II has been quiet, too, with the striped bass frater- 
nity along the San Antonio. It rained so hard last 
Sunday that few of the boys ventured out. 

— — o 

NATIONAL RIFLE ASSOCIATION DOINGS. 



The grst two weeks in January will be busy times 
for the National Rifle Association and the National 
Board for I'romotion of Rifle Practice. The former 
will hold its annual meeting of the Board of Directors 
at the New Willard Hotel on the evening of Wednes- 
day, January 12, and the following day the annual 
meeting of the National Board will be held in the 
office of the Assistant Secretary of War. There will 
also be meetings of subcommittees on rules and 
range construction and legislation and it is probable 
that meetings will be held with the military commit- 
tees of the House and Senate. At the National Board 
meeting it will be decided whether there will be 
annual matches during 1916. Sentiment outside of 
the War Department seems to be imanimous for these 
matches to be held annually but the Department will 
probably lake the stand that it is impossible to spare 
the troops for Ihe matches during maneuver year, 
which will be in 1916. This objection could probably 
be met by the use of National Guardsmen to do this 
work. As to a range for holding the 1916 matches 
there are still only three ranges available: Camp 
Perry, Ohio, Sparta, Wis., and Jacksonville, Fir/ 
The Sparta range would require the expenditure of 
considerable money to get it ready for Ihe matches. 
Quartermasler storehouses and mess buildings would 
have lo be constructed and considerable repair work 
done lo the range itself. Sea Girt, of course, is anx- 
ious to have the matches and everybody would be 
pleased to go to the beautiful and salubrious seaside 
range in ,Iersey, but if more than forty teams should 
attend the shoot, it would be almost impossible for 
the Sea Girt range to accommodate the match. 

It has been suggested that with very lillle expense 
and trouble the Camp Alger range, the Stale range 
of the Illinois National Guard, could be made avail- 
able for the national matches if Illinois wanted them. 
All required of the range would be the construction 
of an additional butt of .50 targets. As an alterna- 
tive Ihe War Department may ask Congress for an 
appropriation lo be made immediately available for 
Ihe conslruclion of a large federal range near Wash- 
ington Efforts have been made for ihv last ten year." 
to provide the National Capital with a model federal 
range which could be used jointly by all branch(>s of 
the service stationed in and around Washington, as 
well as the National Guard and civilian rifle clubs, 
Ihe high school cadets and the boy scouts. It is only 
a matter of time when the National Guard range at 
Congress Heights, D. ("., will have lo be abandoned. 
A commission appointed by the War DeiiarlmenI In- 
vestigated Ihe (luestion of a federal range near the 
Dislriil and reported to Congress three sites which 
were available, two in Virginia and on in West Vir- 
ginia. II is understood that one Virginia site, recom- 
mended was within ten miles of Washington and on 
or near a local suburban trolley line. Without doubt 
all Ihe Stales of Ihe Union would welcome and look 
forward willi great pleasure lo sending a Slate team 
to national malches that might be held in or near the 
City of Washington, and the latter part of September 
is generally productive of ideal weather. The whole 
question opens up possibilities which would mean the 
great enhancement of rifle practice interest in tJils 
country. Beyond doubt nothing has ever been done 
to Increase this interest as much as the national 
matches and the Government Is well repaid for the 
expenses connected with holding them. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 8, 1916. 



! THE FARM 



GREEN FEED IN WINTER. 

Green feetls tor poultry contain only 
a small perrentaj^e of actual food nu- 
trients, but are important because of 
their succulence and bulk, which light- 
en the grain rations and assist in keep- 
ing the birds in good condition. The 
poultryman should secure a sufficient 
supply of such feeds to last through 
the winter months in sections where 
growing green feeds can not be ob- 
tained. When chickens are fattened 
without the use of milk, green feed 
helps to keep them in good condition. 

Cabbages, mangel wurzels, clover, 
alfalfa, and sprouted oats are the 
green feeds commonly used during the 
winter. Cabbages do not keep as well 
in ordinary cellars as mangel wurzels, 
so where both of these feeds are avail- 
able the cabbages are fed first. They 
are often suspended, while the mangel 
wurzels are split and stuck on a nail 
on the wall of the pen. Clover and al- 
falfa may be fed as hay, cut into one- 
half to 1 inch lengths, or may be 
bought in the form of meal. Rlfalfa 
meal has a feeding analysis equal to 
bran, but is not as digestible on ac- 
count of its larger percentage of fiber. 
Clover and alfalfa should be cut while 
slightly immature, if they are to be 
cured and fi^d to poultry. The leaves 
and chaff from such hay are especially 
adapted for poultry feeding. 

Sprouted oats make a very good 
green feed and are used quite exten- 
sively in this country. The oats can 
be soaked for 12 hours in warm water 
and then spread out in a layer of from 
cne-half to IV2 inches deep on a floor, 
o! in a tray or tier of flats, which have 
openings or holes or a three-sixteenths 
irch mesh wire bottom, so that the 
water drains freely. They may be 
stirred daily and sprinkled, or allowed 
to sprout without stirring, until ready 
for feeding. They are usually fed 
V. hen the sprouts are from 1 to 1% 
inches long, although some poultry- 
men prefer to allow the sprouts to 
grow to 2 to 3 inches long. Oats need 
a moist and warm atmosphere in 
v/hich to sprout quickly, so that it is 
necessary to furnish heat or keep them 
in a warm room during the winter, 
vhile they may be sprouted out of 
doors during the rest of the year. It 
takes from 6 to 10 days to sprout oats, 
depending on the temperature of the 
room. Oats frequently become moldy 
while sprouting. To prevent this, they 
may be treated with formalin, using 1 
pint of formalin to 30 gallons of water, 
which is sprinkled over and thorough- 
ly niived with 30 bushels of oats. Cover 
the oats with a blanket for 24 hours; 
then stir until they are dry. Keep 
them in a sack which has also been 



Warranted 

to give satisfaction. 




GOMBAULT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

A safa, apeedy and 
poiitiva cure for 

Oufk. ayllnt, Swaeay, Capped Hock, 
8tnuB«d Tendons, Founder, wind Puffs, 
and all UnMness from SpaTin, Ringbone 
and etkar bony tumors. Cares all skin 
dlMaaaa or Paratitea, Thrush, Diphtheria. 
■•BvrM all Bucttcs from Horses 01 
Oattlt. 



MAJI KEMKpT for Bhen- 
ralna, Sore^'hroat, eu., it 

ot Osaatio Balaam >old Is 
g\rt mtfiltrMoB Price VI. SO 
MM br onnlsta, or sent bj ex- 
paid, wtUi hlU dlr«cttons tor Its 



I UTUMI-imiUlU OaiPlKT, CliTtlt&d, Otjx 




soaked in formalin. Oats thus treated 
and dried may be held for a long time 
for sprouting. 

Where the double-yard system of 
conftnind poultry is used, one of the 
yards is kept in green feed into which 
the hens are turned when the crop at- 
tains a height or 4 or 5 Inches. This 
method of alternately yarding poultry 
furnishes green feed for the birds and 
at the same time freshens the yard. 
Rape, wheat, rye, oats, and barley are 
usually sown for this purpose. Rye is 
good for late fall and early spring 
feeding, as it will live through the win- 
ter in most sections. Oats, wheat, and 
barley are used throughout the spring, 
summer and early fall. Several of 
these grains may be sown together to 
secure a greater variety of green feed, 
and any quick-growing grains may be 
used for this purpose. 

o — 

ONE COW WOULD SUPPLY 47 
PERSONS, 



If you were keeping forty-seven per- 
sons in a boarding house and had only 
one cow to supply milk and butter, 
what would you do? 

If the cow were Carlotta Pontiac, a 
12-year-old Holstein bred and owned 
ty the dairy husbandry department of 
the College of Agriculture of the Uni- 
versity of Missouri at Columbia and 
you gave each boarder an amount 
equal to the per capita consumption 
of milk and butter in the United States 
you would not need to do anything but 
sell 9,643 pounds of milk every year. 
That is the amount she produced each 
of the last three years above the per 
capita allowance for forty-seven per- 
sons. The per capita consumption is 
figured, on the calculation of the P. S. 
Department of Agriculture, as 17.6 
pounds of butter a year and one-third 
ot a quart of milk a day. 

In three years Carlotta Pontias has 
produced 64,957 pounds of milk and 
2.480 pounds of butter. The average 
Missouri cow would have furnished in 
that time 10,.'>00 pounds of milk and 
420 of butter, about one-sixth as much 
av. Ciarlotta. 

At the average price in Columbia of 
7% cents a quart for milk, Carlotta's 
product in the three years would be 
worth ?2,319.90. At 30 cents a pound 
for th(> butter and 25 cents a hundred 
pounds for skim milk, it would be 
\^orth .?882.05. The later return would 
involve little cost of handling. 

Carlotta Pontiac's three year old rec- 
ord perhaps has not been equaled by 
any other cow in Missouri. She is still 
producing milk, having given birth to 
a heifer calf three weeks ago. How- 
e\er, she is not an test now. The pro- 
duction of Carlotta Pontiac is made 
possible by her breeding. A record 
made by her three years ago was 
broken a year later by her ungrateful 
sister. 

Like other cows in the dairy herd at 
the University, Carlotta eats grain, 
corn silage, and alfalfa hay. Of the 
silage and hay she has all she will 
eat. With the grain she gets cotton- 
seed meal and bran. 

Carlotta's home is a large box stall 
01 iron bars with straw for a bed. The 
only favor that she has which is not 
thared by other cows In the herd is 
that her door is fastened with an extra 
bi'tton on the outside. For a time she 
enjoyed the privilege of lifting the 
latch of her door and walking out with- 
out the permission of her keeper. 
When the keeper leaves her now, Car- 
lotta knows that he will turn the but- 
ton and stands resigned to her impris- 
onment. But let a stranger leave the 
stall, Carlotta suspects his ignorance 
of her methods and tries to lift the 
h.tch. Often she is successful. — Mis- 
souri Stockman. 



CO-OPERATION IN MARKETING 
AND PURCHASING. 



The advantages of co-operation in 
marketing of farm products are em- 
phasized in the annual report of the 
office of markets and rural organiza- 
tions of the department of agriculture, 
which has just been published. "The 
conclusion seems warranted," says the 
report, "that in communities where co- 
operation is practically applied to the 
farmer's business, the results obtained 
are far more satisfactory than those 
secured by the individual methods." It 
is estimated that farmers' co-operative 
marketing and purchasing organiza- 
tions will transact this year a total 



business amounting to more than one 
billion, four hundred million dollars. 
Agricultural co-operation in the Unit- 
ed States is, therefore, far more preva- 
lent than is generally believed, but it 
i" not yet upon a sufficiently strong 
business basis. For this reason the 
office of markets has studied the vari- 
ous methods employed by these asso- 
ciations and has worked to devise 
means by which these methods can 
bo perfected. The studies also have 
included the prevailing methods of 
n:afketing perishable products — cot- 
ton, grain, cottonseed, livestock and 
animal products. 



FARM THAT WAS MADE TO PAY. 



A significant instance of what prop- 
er methods of farm management can 
accomplish is afforded by a certain 500 
acre farm in central Michigan. For 
ten years this farm failed to pay inter- 
est on the capital invested. One year 
after the owners had been induced to 
make certain radical changes the farm 
paid all the expenses of operation and 
returned them 5 per cent on an invest- 
ment of $60,000. The changes which 
accomplished this financial revolution 
were as follows: 

Four horse power was substituted 
foi' two-horse. 

The unprofitable cows in the dairy 
herd were weeded out and sold and 
the money received for them Invested 
in better stock. 

A silo was built. 

The foreman was allowed, in addi- 
tion to his salary, 10 per cent of the 
net income from the farm. The ex- 
penses of operating the farm, but not 
the interest on the capital, were de- 
ducted from the income before the 
foreman received his percentage. 

It was this last suggestion which 
met with the most opposition from the 
owners o fthe farm, but when it was 
pointed out to them that for every 
dollar the foreman received under such 
an arrangement they would get $9 they 
yielded. — Field and Farm. 



WINTERING IDLE HORSES. 



At this time of the year practically 
all the heavy work on most farms has 
been finished, and with the approach 
of winter horses are more or less idle. 
Since idle horses give no return in 
liibor performed, the feeding should 
be as economical as possible, and prop- 
er care should be taken of the ani- 
mals in order that they may be in the 
best possible condition for work in 
the early spring. 

Horses should not be confined to the 
barn during the winter on a liberal 
supply of grain. It is far better to 
"rough" them through the cold 
months. They should be given the 
run of the yard or lot during the day. 
This should be provided with a pro- 
tected shed, one that is thoroughly dry 
and well provided with bedding. While 
nature does her part and protects the 
horse with a heavy coat of hair during 
the cold months, the shed is necessary 
in order to afford the necessary shel- 
ter and protection against rains, snow, 
and cold winds. Winter winds come 
mostly from the north and northvv'est, 
and the shed should be so situated and 
constructed as to give the proper pro- 
tection from this quarter. 

In the feeding of idle horses the 
high-priced feeds should be avoided 
in order to keep them in proper con- 
dition at the lowest cost. It has been 
found that idle horses do very well 
on a winter feed consisting of all the 
hay, oat straw, cornstalks, or sorgh- 
ums they will consume, so that little 
grain is necessary. Idleness also per- 
mits of a more through mastication of 
the feed, thus insuring proper diges- 
tion. 

From six to eight weeks before the 
spring work is started the horses 
should be put at light work and start- 
ed on a small grain ration in order 
that they may be in proper condition 
foi the work required of them. The 
grain ration may then be gradually in- 
creased until the regular allowance 
has been reached for the working sea- 
son. 

Growing colts require considerable 
protein. They should be so fed as to 
secure proper development and at a 
minimum cost. Rough feed, such as 
cleaned mixed hay, alfalfa or clover, 
may be fed along with a mixture of 
bran, oats, and corn. 



PONY 

(GRAPHITE) 

AXLE 
GREASE, 




is put up 
in a small 
package (lib.) 
because it 
loesn't take 
''much todothe 
work well. . 
Try it— most dealers 

''WHITTIER-COBl'RN COMPANY 
San Francisco 



Classified Advertising 



PERCHERON STALLION WANTED. 

Will buy, lease or trade. Must be 
blocky and registered. 

J. H. NELSON, 
Box 361, Selma, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

HE.ST POLICY 42378, one of the best 
br<jfi hor.st'.<; in the world. Handsome bay 
lu.r.sc, small .star in forehead, left hind 
pa.stern and left fore heel white. Has size, 
heavy boned, stylish, pure Kaited trotter, 
.S( und, and a splendid individual in every 
respect. Best Policy is by Allerton 5128, 
dam Kxine 2:1814 by Expedition, next 
dam Kuxine by Axtell, next dam Russia 
b> Harold 413, next dam Miss Russell, 
dam of Maud S., etc. Best Policy has 
trotted a mile on the Hanford half mile 
track in 2:12. He is ten years old and 
with little training would make a good 
p.nme race horse, and ninety percent of 
his colts ;ire trotters. He will be .sold at 
a great -sacridce. For price and further 
particulars address 

BRIOEDKR & SPORTSMAN. 
P. O. Box 447, .San Francisco, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

The flve-year-old pacer The Fool, trial 
tliis season with limited opportunity in 
2:11. halves in 1:03, quarters in 30 sec- 
onds. A pleasure to drive this follow and 
an amateur will drive him in better than 
ten in the matinees next season. 

Also Oro Bond, three-year-old. But for 
a slight injury late in the sea.son would 
have been heard from in the stakes this 
.vear. He is now sound and ready for 
some one to point for the rijces next year. 
Will make a sure enough racehorse. These 
two priced to sell. 

Breeding and price on application. 

DR. I. L. TUCKER. 

Oroville, Cal. 



Dividend Notice 
THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN 
SOCIETY 
(The German Bank) 

526 California St. 
MISSION BRANCH, corner Mi-ssion and 
21st Sts. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, cor- 
ner Clement St. and 7th Ave. 
HAK3HT STREET BRANCH, corner 
Haight and Belvedere Sts. 
For the half year ending December 31, 
1915, a dividend has been declared at the 
rate of four (4) per cent per annum on 
all deposits, payable on and after Monday, 
January 5, 1916. Dividends not called for 
are added to the depo.sit account and 
earn dividends from January 1. 1916. 

GEORGE TOURNEY, Manager. 

FOR SALE. 

New "Ideal McMurray" light track cart for 
matinees, workouts, speeding and jogBing. First- 
class, down to date cart, weight I.') to .W poimds. 
(frcat strength and carrying power, absolute 
freedom of any hone motion. I'ointructed from 
the heft second growth white hickory. liest 
guaranteed grade of pneumatic tires, handsome- 
ly finished la rich carmine or royal blue, with 
brass screen dash, detachable, and accessoriei 
consisting of serviceable foot pump, completa 
tool and ri'paii kit. wrpuches. oil can. etc.. etc. 
Weight crated 90 pounds. ISrand now and will 
be shipped to any address. For price addresi : 
F. W. KELLEY. 
Breedeu and Sportsman. 

HIGH-CLASS TROTTING BRED COLTS 
FOR SALE. 

No. 1. Three-year-old filly sired by All 
Style, dam Dr. Hicks. This fllly is regis- 
tered. 

No. 2. Two-year-old colt, full brother 
to the above. 

No. 3. Two-year-old Ally sired by Dan 
Logan, dam a Wilkes mare who was a 
great natural pacer but unfortunately was 
crippled by a barbed wire accident as a 
yearling and was never worked. 

The All Styles are large, strong built, 
with all the style of their sire, perfect In 
action, and all three of the a!)ove colts 
should make race horses second to none. 
The Dan Logan fllly is perfectly gentle to 
handle and drive and is a high-class flliy 
ip every respect. Apply to or address, 
I. F. EATON, Chlco, Cal. 



1 



Saturday, January 8, 1916.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



13 



BEAUTIFUL BELVEDERE 



LOTS FOR SALE 



CORINTHIAN ISLAND Subdivision to Belvedere is the 
most beautiful spot on the shores of San Francisco Bay 
for a suburban home. It commands an extensive view of 
the City of San Francisco, Alcatraz and Angel Islands, 
Raccoon Straits, San Francisco Bay, Richardson's Bay, 
the Berkeley shore, beautiful Belvedere and Mt. Tamal- 
pais. It is in Marin County, directly opposite San Fran- 
cisco, and forms the eastern shore of Belvedere cove. 
It has a naturally terraced, sunny, western slope that is 
well adapted for many choice residence sites, every one 
affording most picturesque views of the bay and moun- 
tain. It is protected from the prevailing western trade winds in 
summer by Belvedere Island, and from the southerly storms in 
winter by Angel Island. The soil is fertile and part of the island 
is well wooded. 

It is less subject to fog than any other place near San 
Francisco. The summer fog, as it rolls in from the ocean, splits 
on the western slope of Sausalito, part of it flowing in a line with 
Angel Island towards the Berkeley shore, and part of it along 
the southern slope of Mt. Tamalpais, leaving Belvedere, Corin- 
thian Island and Raccoon Straits in the bright sunlight, while 
the fog banks can be seen as a white wall both to the north and 
the south. 

There is very little available land about the shores of San 
Francisco Bay that is desirable for homes, especially for those 
who love boating and kindred sports. The Alameda and Contra 
Costa shores of the bay are the lee shores and receive the full 
brunt of the boisterous trade winds which lash the shoal waters 
near the land into muddy waves, making boating both unpleas- 
ant and dangerous. To the north of the city and in Marin 
County the land from Sausalito to the entrance of the bay is a 
Government reservation and will never be placed on the market. 
The shores of Richardson's Bay are not at present convenient 
to boat service and, aside from Belvedere and Corinthian Island, 
there is little or no land near any ferry landing that possesses 
the natural advantages, improvements and possibilities that are 
offered on Corinthian Island. Concrete roads, pure water, tele- 
phone service and electric light wires are already installed. It is 
only ten minutes' walk from any point on the property to 
Tiburon boats, and but forty-three minutes' ride to the foot of 
Market Street. 

On the point of Corinthian Island the Corinthian Yacht 
Club has had its home for many years, and on any summer day 
the white sails of its numerous fleet add to the charming scene, 
as the trim yachts glide about the cove. Excellent fishing of all 
kinds for bay fish, including salmon, the gamey striped bass, 
rock fish and the toothsome silver smelt, is to be had in the cove. 
There is probably no spot so accessible and in such close prox- 
imity to any large city in the world that offers the attractions 
of climate, magnificent scenery, fishing and boating as will here 
be found. 



FOR MAPS, PRICES AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO 



S. L. PLANT, 

PLANT RUBBER AND SUPPLY CO., 

32 B£AL£ STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 



F. W. KELLEY, 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN OFFICE, 

366 PACIFIC BUILDING 

San Francisco, Cal. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday. January 8, 1916. 



FARMERS NEED FERTILIZERS. 



Washington, Jan. 2.— A gloomy view 
of prospects for fertilizing next year's 
crops was presented in a statement is- 
sued today by Secretary Houston of 
the department of agriculture. The 
secretary urged farmers to conserve 
all fertilizing materials and to use 
lime and ecostate crops, so as to in- 
crease the productivity of the soil. 

Relief measures undertaken by the 
department since the European war 
disrupted the American phosphate in- 
dustry and cut off potash imports from 
Germany, will help, the statement 
says, but they offer slim possibilities 
that the American farmer will get a 
small part of the fertilizing materials 
necessary for his needs. Nitrogenous 
fertilizers alone will be available in 
the quantities needed. 

The secretary took up first the pot- 
ash supply, long since exhausted in 
the United States by the German em- 
bargo on shipments. Investigation, 
said his statement, has shown four 
sources of supply in this country, but 
none immediately available. These are 
the kelp beds of the Pacific coast, 
aiunite deposits in Utah, feldspathic 
rocks in the East, and the mud of 
Searles lake, California. 

Manufacture from feldspar has been 
found feasible, but the cost is high. 
Development of Searles lake deposits 
presents technical difficulties and title 
10 the property is involved. Manufac- 
turers are experimenting, the state- 
mi nt said, with aiunite. Kelp was of- 
fered as the best material. Three 
large companies have begun manufac- 
ture from kelp and government ex- 
perts will be sent to the Pacific coast 
to aid the experimental work. 

Production will be slow for a long 
time, it was pointed out, and demand 
for potash in other manufactures in 
the United States will be so great that 
none will be available for agricultural 
purposes for a long time. 

The prices offered under existing 
conditions by the manufacturers of ar- 
ticles will cause practically the entire 
output of these concerns to be divert- 
ed from the fertilizer industry. It 
would require 90 or more plants cost- 



ing approximately $.50,000 each, and 
having an operating capital of $25,000 
ej'.ch, to produce the quantity needed 
lor agriculture. This would involve 
the assumption that commercial phas- 
es of the problem were satisfactorily 
solved. 

The crippled state of the phosphate 
industry was attributed to the high 
price of sulphuric acid, much of which 
is being used in the manufacture of 
war munitions. The price has jumped 
from $5 to $25 a ton. Demand for the 
acid is so heavy that abandoned plants 
are being refitted for its manufacture. 
The bureau of soils, meanwhile, is ex- 
perimenting with the manufacture of 
phosphoric acid as a substitute for 
sulphuric acid. 

Nitric prices have advanced, but 
there is an abundant supply of nitrog- 
enous fertilizing material, and the de- 
partment of agriculture is endeavor- 
ing to find methods to cheapen the 
cost of manufacture. 

o 

AIM OF AGRICULTURAL CLUBS. 



The principal objects to be attained 
through the promotion of boys' agri- 
cultural clubs in the South, as defined 
by those in charge of this work, are: 

1. To encourage and train boys 
along the lines of the activities of 
country life. 

2. To put into practice the facts of 
scienti.c agriculture obtained from 
books, bulletins, etc. 

3. To bring the school life of the 
boy into closer relationship to his 
home life. 

4. To assist in the development of 
the spirit of co-operation in the family 
and in the community. 

5. To dignify and magnify the voca- 
tion of the farmer and by demonstrat- 
ing the returns which may be secured 
from farming when it is properly con- 
ducted. 

6. To enlarge the vision of the boy 
and to give him definite purposes at an 
important period in his life. 

7. To furnish to the aggressive, 
progressive rural school teacher an 
opportunity to vitalize the work of the 
school by correlating the teaching of 
agriculture with actual practice. 




ABSOR 

» * TRADE MARK Rl 



tINE 



TRADE MARK REG.U.S.PAT. OFF. 



Reduces Strained, Puffy Ankles, 
Lymphangitis, Poll Evil, Fistula, 
Boils, Swellings; Stops Lameness 
and allays pain. Heals Sores, Cuts, 
Bruises, Boot Chafes. It is an 
ANTISEPTIC AND GERMICIDE 

Does not blister or remove the 
hair and horse can be worked. Pleasant to use. 
$2. 00 a bottle, delivered. Describe your case 
for special instructions and Book 5 K free. 
ABSORBINE, JR., antiseptic linimeni for mankind re 
ducc« Strains. Painful. Knotted. Swollen Veins. Milk I.cg, 
Gout. Concentratcii — only a few drops required aiauappU- 
cation. Price {1 per bottle at dealers or delivered. 
W. F. yOUNG, H, U. F., 54 Temple St., Springfield, Mast. 

For b7 Lugley ft MlchMla, San Fruicuco, Caltr; 
Woodward, Clark A Co , Portland. Or« : Cal Drug A Ch«m. 
Co., Broujwlg Prng Co , Weitorn Wholesale Drug Co., Lot 
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Pacific Drug. Co., Seattle, Waih.. Spokane Dm; Co.. 8pc 
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HOUSEHOLD SUPPLIES:- 

"•inith's Pay th* Freight"— to reduce the 
higli cost of living, send (or our Wholesale to 
Consumer Catalogue. Smith's Cash .Store. 110-H 
( lay Street, ban Francisco. 



Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalzlel 

EJvery facility to give the beat of pro- 
fessional services to all cases of veterin- 
ary dentistry. Complicated cases treated 
successfully. Calls from out of town 
promptly responded to. 

Tha beat work at reaaonabia prlcaa 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL 
MO Fulton St. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm .r. EGAN. V.M.R.C.S. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 
116B Qoldsn Oat* Av*. 
Branch Hospital, corner Webstar ano 
Chestnut StrseU. 
•an Franelaoo, Cal. 



Third Edition Within One Year of Pub- 
liiation. 

CARE AND TRAINING OF 
TROHERS AND PACERS 

NEVER before In the history of the 
I'ubllshlng world has a horse book 
gone into a third edition within one 
yiur of publication. Yet the explanation 
is simple — the book fills a long-felt want. 

.Ntver before has this subject been 
triated In a distinct manner. It bas been 
handled In connection with autobiographies 
of trainers, but such works are out of 
print or out of date, for they were pub- 
lished 20 years or more ago. Conditions 
and methods have changed since then, 
and former treatises are Just as much 
out of date as the high-wheel sulkies 
then In vogue. 

"Care and Training of Trotters and 
Pacers" Is as modern as a 42-centlmeter 
gun. It does not contain the Ideas of 
one man, but of 100 of the leading horse- 
men of the day. Including Thomas W. 
Murphy, Walter R. Cox, and Edward F. 
Gcers. These Ideas were converted Into 
book form by two prominent American 
turf journalists. 

This book enables anyone to do his own 
caretaklug and training until It is time 
to send the colt to a professional trainer, 
or the owner can train and race the colt 
himself. The treatise covers the details 
of a colt's life from the moment It Is 
foaled until after Its first year's cam- 
paign. The facts are clearly presented. 
Nothing Is left to guess work. The lan- 
guage is lucid. Both theoretical and 
practical views are outlined and com- 
pared. The instructions are concise and 
easily understood. The work contains no 
advcrtlscnunts — It Is not a catch-penny 
pulillcation that looks big In the adver- 
tisiiuent but proves disappointing when 
rc.clved. 

.Many professional trainers have pur- 
chased the book and have found It In- 
teresting. Despite the war. over 300 
roples have been sold In Europe and Aus- 
tralia. 

Price $1.00 postpaid. Cloth, 

. illustrated, 178 pages, 6x7 Inches, 

THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

366 Pacific BIdg., San Francisco, Cal 
or Post Office Drawer 447 



ALL CUTS 
IN THIS PUBLICATION MADE BY 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PHOTO -ENGRAVING CO. 

215 LEIDESDORFF ST., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Sutter 5398 



Harpers Weekly and The Breeder and Sportsman 

$5.^ WORTH FOR $3.^ 



Breeder and Sportsman 

One Year, 52 Copies, Regular Price $3 

THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN Is the oldest 
weekly Journal devoted to the Horse west of Chicago, 
having been established in 1882. This Interest, together 
with the Kennel, Gun, Fishing, Coursing and kindred 
sports receiving the most attention In Us columns; to- 
gether with Agricultural and Dairying Departments, 
under whose headings especial attention Is paid to the 
breeding, etc., of Cattle, Sheep, Hogs, Poultry, and all 
other animals connected with stock raising. 

As an advertising medium to Racing Associations, 
Horsemen, Stock Breeders, Manufacturers of Sulkies, Car- 
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and Machinery, Sporting Goods, Fanciers, Stock Foods, 
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within the field mentioned above, the BREEDER AND 
SPORTSMAN will be found indispensable. 



Harpers Weekly 

Six Montlis. 26 Copies, Regular Price $2.50 

At no time has It been so evident to Americans as now, 
that the most important thing In the lives of all of us Is 
the progress of the European War. 

Next to your daily bread the war Interests you most 
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The periodical of greatest fundamental Interest to you 
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war that come closest to your country and you. 

Because of connections abroad and at home, HARPER'S 
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As a critical commentary that presents Inside facts, It 
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You want HARPER'S WEEKLY now. You can get It 
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Send $3.25 Now and Get Them Both 

THIS OFFER is made to all ^vho will send us $3.25 before January 31st, 19 IG, whether for extension of 
subscription, renewal of subscription or a new subscription. Address: 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



P. O. Drawer 447 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Saturday. January 8. 1916.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



Is 




Get read}' now — do not wait until spring is upon you. 
It will pay you to be sure and safe in treating your horse. 

The experience of the most successful trainers all favor Save-The-Horse. 
because no other known remedy so perfectly and permanently cures; — the cure 
made with Save-The-Horse stands every test. 

Procrastination is dangerous, ^^'rite today for our 96 page Save-The-Horse 
Book. Remember, it will cost you nothin,4 — describe your case and you will 
get a prompt reply. 

Every bottle is sold with a bindine; contract to refund money or cure 
any case of Bone andBog Spavin. Thoroughpin. Ringbone (except low), 
Curb, Splint, Capped Hock. Wind-Puff. Shoe Boil. Broken Down, 
Injured Tendon and Other Lameness. Horse works as u.sual. Winter 
or Summer. 

TROY CHEMICAL CO., BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



D. E. NEWELL, Agent, 80 Bayo Vista Ave., OAKLAND, CAL. 

SAVE-THE-HORSE is sold with Contract by Druggists and 
Dealers Everywhere or we send prepaid on receipt of price. 



Makes Them Sound SMITH'S WONDER WORKER Keeps Them Sound 

Allays fever and Inflammation at once, this must be done to effect a cure. 
UNEXCELLED AS A REMEDY for bone and bog spavins, curbs, splints, ringbones, 
capped hocks, shoe bolls, wind puffs, thoroughpins and bunches of all kinds, oowed. 
strained and ruptured tendons, shoulder, nip and stifle lameness, weak Joints, 
BWeeny. cording up, throat trouble and rheumatism. Relieves pains and soreness 
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Priea S2. 00 p*r bottlt, prtpaid on rteeipt of prict. $16. 00 pmr dox. ; $10. 00 pet gal. 

DETEL8, Pleasanton Cal., Dls^'ibuting Agent, for the Paciflc Coart. 

W. K. SMITH & CO., Tiffin, Ohio. 



WORMS 

"Wormy." that's what the matter of 'em. .Stomach and inte.s- 
tinal worms. Nearly as bad as distemper. Cost you too much to 
fed 'em. Look bad— are bad. Don't physic em to death. SPOHN'S 
COMPOUND will remove the worms, improve the appetite, and tone 
'em up all round, and don't "physic." Acts on (rlands and blood. 
Full directions with each bottle, ami sold by all dniggists. 




W. E. 




SPOHN MEDICAL CO., 
Chemisis and Bacteriologists, Goshen, ind. 



U. S. A. 



N«W EDITION OF 
JOHN SPLAf'j-S BOOK 



"LIFE WITH THE TROTTER" 



PRICE $3.00 POSTPAID 



"Lilf* 'With the Trotter" elves ua a. clear tnslrbt Into the ways and means to be 
adopted to Increase pace, and preserve It when obtained. Thia work la replete with 
tntereat, and should be read by all sections of society, as It InciJcatas the doctrines of 
kindness to the horse from start to finish." 



Address, BREEDER and SPORTSMAN, P. 
Poclflo Bids., Cor. Market and Fourtk 8U 



O. Drmwer 447, daa rranalaeo, OaL 



S. W. Dixon Frank Davey, 

CuUer 

Exclusive Tailors 
to Men 

=IMPORTERS OF = 

HIGH -CLASS WOOLENS 

BANKERS INVESTMENT BUILDING 
Rooms 405 and W 

742 Market St t9 deary St. 



HEALD'S 
BUSINESS COLLEGE 

trains for Bualnaat and placas Ita grad- 

uataa In poaltlona. 
1216 Van Naaa Avanua, San Franolaoa 

BLAKE MOFFIT S TOWNE 

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I7-1st St., San Francisco. Cal. 
Blaka, McFall * Co., Portland, Ore. 
Blake, Moltlt and Towns, Lioa Aacelaa 



GUNCRAFT 

liy W. A Hruotto 

Amodcrn 
treatise on guns, 
, gun 6tting, am- 
munition, wing 
and (rap sboot- 

'^'/f' 'I hc theoretical side 
of the subject his been 
(ovcrcd with a scientific 
accuracy which makes it 
an up-lo-date book of ref- 
erence, and the practical 
side of wing shooting, gun 
fitting, the mastercye, de- 
'^ccts in vision and other 
important questions have 
been treated in a way that 
will enable cither the ex- 
pert or the amateur to de- 
termine if hr is shooting w ith a gun that fits him and 
bow to decide upon one that docs. It will enable 
him to ascertain why he misses some shots and is 
successful with others. The secrets of success in trap 
shooting, as well as the peculiarities in flight of the 
quail, the jacksnipe, the woodcock, the ruffed grouse, 
and the duck family, are illustrated by drawings and 
described in a way that will facilitate the amateur in 
mastering the art of w ing jihooiing. 

Cartridge board cover, $1.00; Cloih, $1.50 

BREEDER & SPORTSMAN. 
Post Office Drawer 447, San Francisco 




BRING JM DOWN WITH 

Powders 




lAfllEN YOUR 
■ jjame comes 
Hying towards the 
l)lind, bring 'em 
down with good 
,'^hooting. Power, speed and pen- 
etration, — the.se are the game-getting 
(|uaHtics wliicit make 

DU PONT POWDERS 
the choice of 80% of the sportsmen. 

Make a Full Bag This Trip 

.Shoot DU PONT or BALLISTITE if smokeless is 
preferred, or DU PONT RIFLE if you like a black 
powder,— they're the game-getters. 

"WHAT LOAD SHALL I USE" 

is answered in our powder booklets. Send a postal 
for them today to our Sporting Powder Division 




E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co. 

POWDER MAKERS SINCE 1802 
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE. 



-THE WORLD'S RECORD!!! 

Mr. Lester German, shooting at the Westy Hognn tournament at Atlantic City, Sep- 
tember 15 10 17, scored 

647 OUT OF 650 TARGETS 

.shooting his PARKER GUN, which is the greatest score ever made at a Registered 
TouriiaiiiL'nt. 

At Portland, Oregon, Mr. Peter H. O'Brien scored 241 targets straight, making 
PACIFIC COAST RECORD 

with hi.s Parker gun. 

At San Diego Mr. Henry Pfirrmann won the Paciflc Coast Handicap, with Mr. J. Fos- 
ter Cout.s .second. 

At i^a.n Francisco, in the California-Nevada State Tournament. Mr. Pflrrmann won 
high average and Mr. Cout.s won the Championship of California — all of which was 
done with 

PARKER GUNS 

For game shooting afield, enhance the pleasure of the day's sport and improve 
your .skill by shooting a small gauge PARKER GUN, pionei.T makers of small borea 
in America. Instructive booklet on .small bore guns sent free on request. 

For further p.irticulars regarding guns from 8 to 28 gauge, addres.s. 
PARKER BROS., Merlden, Conn. New York Salesroom, 32 Warren Street; 

or A. W. duBray, Residing Agent, San Francisco, P. O. Box 102 



A 

Practical 
Treatise 
on the 
Training 
of Hounds 



I 



Training^^Hound 




Foxhonnds 

Beagles 
and 
Coonbounds 



The system of training advocated Is .simple and effectn , so that anyone 
who carries out In.structioiiH can easily develop a foxhound, a ln'agle or a coon 
dog to the highest state of usefulness or organize a pack in uhlcli e.'ich hound 
will work independently and at the same time harmoniously with the others. 
The subjects are: The Mound's Ancestry, History, Instinctive Tendencies. Eng- 
lish and Native Hounds. Developing the Intelligence. Training the Foxhound, 
Voices iind I"ace of the Hound. «,jualllleH of Scent. Manners. Training the Coon 
Dog, Coon Hunting, Training the Hengle, f'-ornilng a I'.ick, Field Trial Handling. 
Faults and Vices, Conditioning. Selecting and Rearing l'up|)les. Kennels and 
Yards. Dlseiises of Hounds and Their Treatment. The chapters on field trial 
training and handling .ire alone worth the price of the book, which Is one that 
everv man who loves the voice of a hound should read. 

The book contains 221 pages, is clearly printed, nicely bound, and hand- 
Domely illustrated with bloodhounds, 'various types or English and Amerlcaa 
foxhounds, beagles and cross-bred dogs for 'possum and coon hunting. 

Price, In heavy paper cover, $1; cloth, $1.50, portpald. 
— Addr«s«: — 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

P. O. Drawer 447, San Pranolaoo, Cal. 



The Grand International Heindic&p 



At the St. Thomas, Ontario, Tournament, Nov. 29-Dec. 1, was won by 
Mr. W. J. McCance, Captain of the St. Thomas Gun Club. Score 



96 X 100 using PETERS SHELLS 

The High General Average at this shoot was won by that popular veteran, Mr. Rolla Heikes, who In 
spite of adverse weather conditions, scored 

385 X 400 using PETERS SHELLS 

This was the largest and most important tournament of the 1915 Fall season, and the winning of the two 
chief honors by users of Peters Shells, is in keeping with the remarkable record of successes made 
with the brand. 

THE PETERS CARTRIDGE CO.. Pacific Coast Branch, 583-585 Howard Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

"W/NCHESTER 

Repeating Rifles For Hunting 

In choosing a rifle for any purpose, its reliability and accuracy 
should be carefully considered. Winchester rifles enjoy the high- 
est reputation the world over for reliability, accuracy, strong 
shooting qualities and finish. They are made in all desirable cal- 
ibers from .22 to .50, and in eleven different models. From these a 
Winchester can be selected that will meet any shooting requirement. 

jV/AfC/f/J T £ R CARTRIDGES shoot straight and hit hard. 
These two cardinal points of a good cartridge, and also that of 
reliability, are always found in Winchester ammunition. No matter 
what caliber cartridges yo\x want or whether they are for use in a 
rifle, revolver or pistol, you will get the best results by using Win- 
chester make. Accept no substitute but insist upon the W brand. ■ 

THE GRAND PRIX— the hirhest possible honor— was awarded to the entire Winchester line of rifles, shot- 
gans, metallic cartridges and loaded shotgun shells, etc., at the Panama- Pacific International Ixposilion. 

Every Good Gun Store is a Headquarters for Winchester Guns and Ammunition 






.22 Slide- 
Action Repeater. 



f?/f/es and Cartridges Real .22 Sport 

IN the .22 caliber as in the high-power arms, your shrewd sports- 
man selects his ritie and cartridges for results. 
And when you start to be critical, there's nowhere to stop 
short of l^emlnStQiLUMC . 

Made in single shot models — in Slide-Action models, with the famous Remington- 
UMC breech action— and now, the Autoloading model, the first autoloading rifle that 
successfully handles rim-fire cartridges. 

For real .22 sport get your Rifle and Cartridges from the dealer who displays the 
Red Ball Mark of Remington-UMC. 



Grand Prize 



Highest Possible Honors- "r M J 

Awarded to Remindton-UMC iSE |V| O/l At*!! 
ol the Ponamo-Pacinc Exposition X M.\J^-AS^A H 



Firearms and 
AmmunitionT 



REMINGTON ARMS-UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 
Woolworth Building (233 Broadway) New York City 




SELBY SHOT GUN LOADS 

IN THE BLACK SHELL 

and ® Metallic Ammunition 

This is the combination that Sportsmen who keep up-to-date in ammunition progress 

want — and they know too. 

FROM YOUR DEALER 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD CO.. . . San Erancisco. California. 



SPRINCriFLD 




2 



THb iJREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 15, 1916. 



$3,000: 



GUARANTEED 



ONLY $2.°° TO NOMINATE MARE 



eUARANTEED 




Pacific Breeders Futurity Stal(es No. 16 



$3,000 



TO BE GIVEN BY THE 



Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association 

For Foals of Mares Covered in 1915 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old 

Entries Close February 1, 1916 



$1600 for Trotting Foals. 
$150 to Nominators of Dams of Winners 



$1100 for Pacing Foals 
$100 to Owners if Stallions 




$700 for Three-Year-Old Pacers. 

50 to the Nominator of Ihe Dam on whose Original Entry is named the Winner of 
Three-Year-Old Pace. 
400 for Two-Year-Old Pacers. 
25 to the Nominator of the Dam on whose Original Entry is named the Winner of 

Two-Year-Old Pace. 
50 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace when 
was bred. 



Mare 



$5 August 1. 1916; 
$50 to start in the 



$1000 for Three-Year-Old Trotters. 

50 to the Nominator of Ihe Dam on whose Original Entry is named the Winner of 
Three-Year-Old Trot. 
600 for Two-Year-Old Trotters. 
25 to the Nominator of the Dam on whose Original Entry is named the Winner of 
Two-Year-Old Trot. 

50 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when Mare 
was bred. 

SPECIAL CASH PRIZES FOR STALLION OWNERS. 

Given to Owners of Stallions standing highest in number of Mares nominated in this Stake that were bred to their respective horses, divided as follows 

FIRST PRIZE, $35; SECOND PRIZE, $15. 

Th« Above Prizes will be Paid on February 20ih, 1916 

ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS — $2 to nominate mare on February 1. 1916; when name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given 
$10 on Yearlings January 1, 1917; $10 on Two- Year-Olds January 1, 1918; $10 on Three-Year-Olds January 1. 1919. 

STARTING PAYMENTS.— $25 to start in the Two-Year-Old Pace; $35 to start in the Two-Year-Old Trot; $35 to start in the Three-Year-Old Pace; 
Three-Year-Old Trot. All Starting Payments to be made ten days before the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 

Nominators must designate when making payments to start whether the horse entered is a Trotter or Pacer. 

Colts that start at Two Years Old are not barred from starting again in the Three-Year-Old Divisions. 

CONDITIONS: 

The races fnr Two-Year-Olds will be mile heats, 2 in 3, not to exceed three heats, and if not decided in two heats, will be finished at the end of the third heat and money 
divided according lo rank in the summary; and for Three-Year-Olds — three heats, money divided 25 per cent to the first heat, 25 per cent to the second heat, 25 per cent to the 
tnird heat, and 25 per cent to the race according to rank in the summary. Money in each division 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. Should two or more horses be tied for first 
pl.ice at the completion of the third heat, such horses only shall contest in a fourth heat ond money divided according to rank in the summary at the termination of that heat. 
A horse having won the first two heats and drawn or distanced in the third heat shall tict lose position in the summary. Distance for Two-Year-Olds, 150 yards; for Three- 
Yenr-Olds, 100 yards. 

If a mare proves barren or slips or has a dead foal or twins; or if either the mare or foal dies before January 1, 1917, her nominator may sell or transfer his nomination or 
substitute another mare or foal, regardless of ownership; but there will be no return of a payment, nor will any entry be liable for more than amount paid in or contracted for. 
In entries, the name, color and pedigree of mare must be given; also the name of the horse to which she was bred in 1915. 

Entries must be accompanied by entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only tor amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $3000, the amount of the guar- 
antee, only. 

Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacing divisions. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these Stakes in case the number of entries received is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors. 
Money divided in each division of the Stake 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division or heat than there are starters. 
Entries open to the world. Membership not required to enter; but no horses, wherever owned, will be allowed to start until the owner has become a member. 

Write for Entry Blank-s to 

E. P. HEALD, F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 

President. P. O. Drawer 447. 366 Pacific Building, San Francisco, Cal. 




M 



Saturday, January 15, 1916.] 



'i'HE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
Turf and Sporting Authority on the Pacific Coast. 

(Established 1SS2.) 
Published every Saturday. 
F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACFIC BUILDING 
Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
National Newspaper Bureau, Agent, 219 Bast 23rd St., 

New York City. 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco P. O. 



Terms — One year, $3; six months, $1.75; three months, $1. 

Foreign postage $1 per year additional; Canadian postage 
50c per year additional. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or regis- 
tered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 
447, San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



TED HAVES DIES IN BUTTE. 



Friday morning of last week news reached Los 
Angeles by wire that Ted Hayes had just passed 
aw-ay as the result of a sudden attack of heart trou- 
ble, the sad news being confirmed later through the 
columns of all the Butte dailies. Only a few short 
weeks ago Ted was in our midst, apparently in the 
very best of health and spirits, and the news of his 
passing comes with all the more shock on that 
account. 

Christened "Charles Fonda" by his parents, he 
became known at a very early age under the nick- 
name of "Ted," and Ted he will always remain in 
the hearts of the thousands of horsemen and sports- 
men in general who held him in high esteem. Indeed, 
in trotting horse circles, he was never known by any 
other name, most people having the idea that the 
Ted wa"s a corruption of Edward or Theodore. 

Born some fifty years ago in the neighborhood of 
Saratoga, N. Y., according to the Butte reports of 
his death, he came west when a young man and 
became identified with the famous Bitterroot Ranch 
of the late Marcus Daly, Bitterroot at that time being 
one of the world's greatest producers of both the 
thoroughbred and the trotter. It was Hayes who 
secured for the copper magnate the imported colt 
Ogden by Kilwarlin — imp. Oriole, who won several 
good races in the Daly colors, including the Futurity 
and the Great Eastern at Sheepshead Bay as a two- 
year-old. It was as trainer and driver of trotters, 
however, that Ted achieved his greatest success, 
racing from the Western tracks to the Grand Circuit 
with the horses of Bitterroot Ranch, and later with 
those belonging to William and Charley Morris, the 
widely known mining men of the little but rich camp 
of Pony, Montana. After the Morrises discontinued 
their racing operations on a large scale he became 
identified with the stable of W. A. Clark, Jr., and for 
a number of years made his headquarters at Los 
Angeles. Most widely known and successful of the 
several horses he handled for Mr. Clark were those 
good race trotters Bon Voyage 2:08 and Bon Courage 
2:08V^, the latter a trotter of exceptional merit. As 
a two-year-old his record of 2:12% at Los Angeles 
stamped him as one of the best geldings of the age 
and gait in the entire country, while both as a two- 
and three-year-old he was a futurity contender of 
rare quality. Last year he was entered in a number 
of races here at the exposition, and when Ted went 
to Los Angeles to put the finishing touches to his 
preparation he drove him to his new record of 
2:081^, which was the fastest mile trotted by a four- 
year-old gelding during the entire season of Amer- 
ican harness racing. 

With the decline of the sport on the Pacific coast 
and the withdrawal of Mr. Clark from active engage- 
ment in the same to any great extent, Mr. Hayes 
went back to Montana and engaged in business in 
Butte, where he had a very wide acquaintance. He 
purchased an interest in the Tuxedo cigar store on 
West Broadway and with Mrs. Hayes assumed the 
management of the Lyric theater on East Park street. 
Both ventures were flourishing, and a new and most 
modern motion picture house, now in process of con- 
struction, was to come under the Hayes management 
upon completion. 

One of the sad features of his demise was that 
his wife was out of the city at the time, not arriving 
until the evening after he had passed away. Friends 
and acquaintances throughout the country, and espe- 
cially here in the west where Mr. Hayes was best 
known and best loved, will join us In extending to 
Mrs. Hayes the most profound sympathy and respect. 



THE STALLION'S OWNER'S INTEREST IN THE 
P. C. T. H. B. A. STAKES. 



While practically every horseman in the west is 
more or less familiar with the opportunities for 
profit presented to them through the medium of the 
local futurities, we wish at this moment to lay espe- 
cial stress upon the attractions offered to stallion 
owners by the sixteenth number of the series pro- 
moted by the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' 
Association, entries to which close with Secretary 
Kelley, Drawer 447 this city, on Tuesday, February 
first, as their interests have always been protected in 
these stakes and are, as usual, looked after in the 
present event. 

In fact, the very first division of the money is made 
payable to stallion owners, fifty dollars of the three 
thousand that compose the entire stake to be paid to 
them on February twentieth, only a little more than 
a montli from today. This sum will be divided into 
two awards, one of thirty-five dollars to be paid to 
the owner of the stallion who has the largest repre- 
sentation of mares bred to him in 1915 and nominated 
in the stake, while the remaining fifteen dollars will 
go to the owner of the horse having the second larg- 
est list in the original entries. An additional one 
hundred dollars is also provided for the benefit of the 
stallion men, to be paid in equal sums of fifty dollars 
each to the owners of the sires of the winners of the 
three-year-old divisions of the stake at the time the 
dam of the winner was bred. These awards are well 
worth working for, and the larger the number of 
mares bred to your stallion and nominated in this 
stake, the greater will be the opportunity for a win- 
ner to be developed from among their foals. 

To assist stallion owners in securing nominations 
of mares bred to their stallions Secretary Kelley 
sent out a call some days ago asking them to send in 
to him a list of broodmare owners who patronized 
their horses in 1915, and quite a number have made 
prompt response to the request. To each man on the 
various lists Mr. Kelley is making a personal appeal 
for nominations, and through the combined efforts of 
the stallion owner and the Association, every worthy 
mare now with foal should be provided with a nom- 
ination in Stake Number Sixteen, thus guaranteeing 
to her foal the very best opportunity for development 
for speed and an early earning capacity. Every foal 
that has a futurity engagement is an advertisement 
for both the sire and dam, and no good youngster 
should have to remain in the barn or pasture and see 
an inferior rival win a good stake merely because its 
owner failed to provide it with an engagement in the 
same. The saddest thing that can be written of a 
really good two- or three-year-old trotter or pacer is 
this: "He had no futurity engagements and hence 
was not fully developed, as he had no earning capac- 
ity at that age." 

Do not let this be said of youngsters that are by 
your good stallion. Make an effort to have every 
mare bred to him represented in this stake, and if 
you have not already sent the list of your patrons to 
the secretary, do so at oncc-, that his efforts may be 
joined to yours. You will find it well worth the 
slight trouble to which you will be put. 



THAT WHITE SOX— HAL BOY MATCH. 



Some weeks ago Mr. Clarence J. Berry in a conver- 
sation with "the boys" who congregate almost daily 
about a certain billiard table at Chick Wright's acad- 
emy in this city, let drop a few remarks concerning 
the relative merits of White Sox and Hal Boy, the 
pair of fast sidewheelers who were the winners of 
the two big stakes given during the exposition race 
meetings last season, and who are without doubt two 
of the classiest racing pacers that the country has 
produced in recent years, both representatives of the 
Pacific coast. After considerable talk had been in- 
dulged in by those present, part of it serious and a 
good deal of it of the "airy persiflage" brand, Mr. 
Berry executed a neat little bunch shot, anchored the 
ivories in the corner of the table long enough to click 
off a run of sufficient length to put the bill up to his 
opponent for settling, and then proceeded to express 
himself to this effect: That he would like to see 
the pair come together over a real good track on a 
real good day, with no outside parties to help or 
hinder either one, as a true test of their respective 
merits, their former meetings having been of the 
catch as catch can order in large fields where racing 
luck necessarily played a considerable figure in the 
deciding of the ultimate result; that as a part of the 
program of any meeting of the Grand Circuit the 



luatcli ought to prove most attractive from the stand- 
point of the general public, and that as a purely 
sporting proposition it ought to be worth about five 
thousand a side to the owners of the horses, and that 
ne, as the owner of the mare, would not be averse to 
wagering this modest sum that he had the better 
horse of the two. 

One or two newspaper men chanced to be among 
those present and they at once proceeded to give Mr. 
Berry's ideas a little airing in the public prints, an 
airing that has resulted in the Hal Boy people sitting 
up and taking notice of the same, as they are of the 
dyed-in-the-wool variety of sportsmen who are not at 
all averse to having a bit of pleasure of this kind out 
of life as they go along. While no "defi" has been 
issued from either party, and Mr. Berry's original re- 
marks on the matter were not intended as such, the 
Indianapolis folks are evidently talking the matter 
over and find that it appeals to them. Early this 
week the editor of this paper received a personal 
letter from an Indianapolis horseman, now retired, a 
friend of both Mr. Fletcher and his racing manager, 
Greeley Winings, which said in part: "By the way, 
if your folks out there really mean it, the match race 
you spoke of a week or so ago will surely materialize, 
as th(> Hal Boy fellows are ready to put up the kale — 
and that would be one race in 1916 that I would cer- 
tainly try to see. If a series of about three such 
meetings could be arranged it would be a grand thing 
for the interest in harness racing, so push them 
along, at least for one match." 



Since the foregoing paragraphs were written the 
current issue of the Western Horseman has come 
to hand and under the heading "Fletcher Accepts 
Challenge" has the following to say concerning the 
matter: 

"Stoughton Fletcher, who owns the famous pacing 
gelding, Hal Boy 2:01i^, has signified his willingness 
to match his horse against White Sox 2:05V4, owned 
by Clarence J. Berry, of San Francisco. His state- 
ment is made in response to a challenge recently 
issued through the Breeder and Sportsman by the 
coast horseman for a match race for |5,000 a side. 

"Mr. Fletcher .says he is perfectly willing to match 
his pacer against the California mare for one or 
three races, $5,000 a side, winner to take all, the race 
or races to be contested at Grand Circuit meetings 
where the most money will be offered for the appear- 
ance of the pair, and the race to be best three in 
five. A forfeit of $1,000 placed in charge of The 
Western Horseman Company, of Indianapolis, is all 
that is necessary, the remainder of the amount to 
be put up later." 

While we take a slight bill of exceptions to the 
wording ot the final sentence of the first paragraph of 
the comment of our esteemed contemporary, our 
original mention of the proposed race not being made 
in the nature of a definite challenge on the part of 
Mr. Berry, from the w'ay matters stand at present 
we are inclined to the idea that the voicing of Mr. 
Fletcher's views by the Indiana journal means that 
the race will come off, as Mr. Berry is not much 
given to talking just for the pleasure of hearing his 
own voice and his original proposal for such a meet- 
ing was made in good faith to those present at the 
time, and with the endorsement of his trainer, Mr. 
William G. Durfee. 

Owing to the fact that at this moment Mr. Berry 
is out of the city, having returned a few days ago 
from Los Angeles only to leave the city almost im- 
mediately on another mission, we are unable to pub- 
lish definite acceptance of the match, but expect to 
be able to do so in our next issue, as he will in all 
probability be back again a very short time. 

II will be "some race." 

o 

WE HAVE IN COURSE OF PREPARATION a 
number of stallion cards and other adv(<rtising mat- 
ter for various California owners who realize the 
importance of early and extensive advertising. If 
you are not one of those who have already given us 
your order we suggest that you take the matter up 
with us at once, giving us ample time to prepare the 
data and put it in the best shape possible. Such 
matters cannot always be handled properly on short 
notice, and the earlier we get to work on your 
advertising, the greater chance it has of being pleas- 
ing to yourself and the public and consequently 
truly effective. We do printing of all kinds for 
stock farms and stallion owners, and our best efforts 
are always at your service. Send along your order 
while there la plenty of time to handle It well. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 15, 1916. 



A Visit with the Los Angeles Horsemen 



Having safely survived two big New Yoar's cele- 
bration dinners at Heniet, and having escaped intact 
from the snow banks that hemmed in that pretty 
little hamlet on all sides, I dropped off at Los Ange- 
les early last week and spent two or three days 
there, giving the once over to the various stables 
of trotters and pacers that are being prepared for 
the campaigns of the coming season, some being 
bound for the northern routes over the Canadian 
prairies, some for the Great Western Circuit, some 
for the smaller meetings of the central west, and 
some for a trip down the big line, while still others 
will remain at home to take in the fairs and race 
meetings that will be provided for them in California 
and the adjoining states of Oregon and Arizona. A 
recent visit from our old friend Jupiter Pluvius had 
curtailed training activities to mere jogging on the 
inside track, but breeding and individuality were 
present in large quantities, and the Los Angeles dele- 
gation can be depended upon to have plenty of speed 
on tap when the time comes for their horses to face 
the starter. 

This prophecy is based on the same grounds as 
the one immortalized some years ago in the New 
England village of Barnstable when Squire Si Hos- 
kins suffered that attack of pneumonia that for a 
time threatened so seriously to prove fatal. As the 
situation increased in gravity certain friends of the 
Squire's, in the depths of their anxiety, hunted up 
Uncle Ezra Endicott, the village seer and prophet, 
and made inquiry of him as to the probability that 
the Squire's illness might prove fatal. Uncle Ezra, 
after devoting to the question the deliberation due 
such a weighty matter, gave it as the result of his 
cogitations and the consumption of half a plug of 
"Star" that, in his opinion, their beloved fellow 
townsman would undoubtedly live until spring. 
Pressed for the grounds upon which he based such 
a strange belief, he finally gave voice to the following 
classic: "Waal, he al'us hez, hain't he?" 

The Los Angeles bunch always have had the speed, 
haven't they? 

Jim Stewart, who usually penetrates to the "farth- 
est north" at which harness racing Is conducted, is 
occupying his customary winter quarters with the 
horses belonging to the Stewart family, master and 
madame, and to his principal patron, J. W. McClain 
of Monarch, Alberta. Homer Mac 2:06%, whose 
numerous campaigns over the two-lap tracks of the 
western portion of the Dominion have gained for him 
the title of "Monarch of the Canadian Prairies," has 
spent the last several months in comparative idle- 
ness, his last engagements having been at the spring 
meeting at the exposition here in San Francisco, 
where he chiseled a piece of money from the purse 
every time he started. He is big and husky and as 
he came through in pretty good shape he will be fixed 
up for another whirl at the halfmile free-for-alls and 
the faster classes. This time last winter he was 
pacing right around the world's record time on the 
ice in eastern Canada, and no doubt he has appreci- 
ated the rest that he has had this season. Homer 
has a son in the McClain string that has the appear- 
ance of being a chip off the old block, the now four- 
year-old bay colt Garland Mac, out of Titus Maid by 
Titus, the youngster having worked at the pace at a 
three-year-old in 2:10, with halves in 1:01 and quar- 
ters in :29V^. He is a good looking fellow and 
Stewart is confident that in him he has the making 
of a real pacer. 

The bright particular star of the McClain portion 
of the stable, however, is the bay horse Patrick de 
Oro (3) 2:221,4, the first of the line of youngsters 
that has sprung Irom the matings of Copa de Oro and 
the bay mare Easter D. (2) 2:13V^. Jim had this 
lad up in Canada in 1914 and won all his starts 
in the three-year-old events for pacers, taking a win 
race record as above given. At Edmonton it was the 
intention to start him for the Canadian record, which 
is somewhere along in the neighborhood of 2:14, or at 
least was at that time, but rain headed off the 
attempt. Unofficially, over the Edmonton track, 
he worked a long mile in 2:08%, witnessed by a 
large number of horsemen who pronounced it the 
he worked a long mile in 2: 08 14, witnessed by a 
by a colt of the age. Pat had some engagements 
at the exposition along with other members of the 
stable, but on the ship from Ottawa at the conclusion 



of the ice racing season he became a very sick horse 
and came very near hitting the long trail. Only the 
best of care and treatment brought him through, and 
when he did get to a point where he took much inter- 
est in his oats it was too late to get him ready for 
his races. Now, however, to look at him no one 
would ever know of the hard deal he had and he looks 
husky and hearty as can be. He is a nmch more 
rugged horse than Rayo de Oro, and Jim has no hesi- 
tation in stating that he will do to take into any kind 
of company whenever he is ready to race. 

This tells the tale so far as the McClain horses 
are concerned, but while I am on the subject of the 
Copa de Oro — Easter D. dynasty I wish to arise to 
state that Easter D. is an exceptionally fine type of 
a ten-yeai--old matron. I had never seen her prior 
to this visit and she was not at the track at the 
time of my arrival, but Jim very kindly sent over to 
the Maben place and had her brought over for me 
to take a look at, the "look" being well worth waiting 
for. She is a good sized mare, bay, nicely turned 
and showing a great deal of breeding in her makeup. 
Her legs are clean and hard and she has plenty of 
heart and lung room as well as carrying capacity for 
a foal. She is a regular breeder and her line of 
Copa de Oro colts is unbroken by a single miss or 
death, while she is again in foal to the cover of the 
same son of Nutwood Wilkes. Stewart has sold 
three of her colts for good prices and has two left, 
a chestnut two-year-old that was given a yearling 
record of 2:22\^ late in December and a mighty 
pleasing yearling filly, just being given her first les- 
sons with the ground lines. Both of them are engaged 
in all the local stakes, of course, and are liable to 
prove troublesome to some folks when the futurities 
roll around. 

Stewart has two other pacers in the stable that 
are his own property, one the bay gelding Humpa 
Hill by F. S. Turner out of a mare by California Dil- 
lon, that paced last year in 2:13 and was in the 
money in a few starts at Riverside and Santa Ana, 
and a three-year-old brown filly by Copa de Oro out 
of Eileen Dillon by California Dillon. This lass has 
no engagements and is hardly more than really well 
broken but can show standard speed for the long 
route, so she seems to be the making of a useful 
thing with a bit of age. Two nice trotters round out 
the string, the six-year-old gelding Guy Boy and a 
two-year-old black filly, not staked, by Carlokin 
2:07% and out of a Guy Dillon mare, grandam by 
McKinney and great grandam By By by Nutwood, 
which is a pretty sturdy line of breeding. She prom- 
ises to live up to her pedigree, as while not a great 
deal has been done with her she went the route in 
2:50 as a yearling. Guy Boy, who is the especial 
pride and property of Mrs. Stewart, is also by Guy 
Dillon and is out of Russie Russell, dam of Ruth 
Dillon 2:06*/^. He is good headed and attends strictly 
to business and has developed to a mile in 2: 11 14, 
while also being in the money last fall at the two 
southern California fairs mentioned above. 

* * « * 

Fred Ward, who had one of the best seasons in 
his entire career in 1915, is taking things very easily 
at present and so are his horses, a bit of easy jogging 
and plenty of play time in good paddocks being about 
all that they are getting for the present. Last May, 
instead of coming to the spring meeting at the expo- 
sition as he had originally planned, Fred shipped out 
to the halfmile tracks in the western edge of the 
corn bell and raced back through the eastern states 
of the Rocky Mountain section, Colorado, Wyoming 
and New Mexico, his three good trotters running up 
their winnings to a figure very close to the nine 
thousand dollar mark. The star of the three is the 
brown gelding Great Northern 2:12^4 by Wayland W., 
out of Cecile M. 2:25i^ by Robin, his share of the 
stable's winnings being a trifle in excess of $5,200, 
a remarkable record indeed when it is considered 
that he was racing all the time for very moderate 
sized purses. In all he started in twenty-three races, 
winning fifteen, being five times second, twice third 
and but once so far down in the summary as fourth. 
When I last saw this fellow in action, in 1914 at the 
Kings County Fair, I thought him one of the lightest 
going trotters that I had ever seen, and Fred tells 
me that he is even more of a "gum shoe" horse now, 
as he has lightened the weight on his front feet by 
several ounces. He is only a seven-year-old now, 



and from what I have seen of him and his way of 
going I expect Fred will still be racing him when he 
is well along toward twice this age. 

Dr. Wayo 2: 12 14, the Kansas bred trotter whom 
Fred has raced for the last five seasons, with win- 
nings in that time amounting to over ten thousand 
dollars, came home in better shape than ever before, 
a fine example of a horse that has gotten sound 
while racing. He was never outside the money last 
season in fourteen starts. El Bel Maden being the 
only one of the three Fred started out with that 
failed to wind up the season with a clean score. She 
was three times unplaced out of a total of eighteen 
races, and at that came home with a brand new rec- 
ord of 2:17 and ran up almost as much money as did 
the redoubtable Doctor. In addition to racing his 
own horses Fred also did quite a bit of catch driving 
at various times throughout the season, being 
actively engaged in nearly eighty events, in only six 
of them finishing behind the money, and running up 
a total of winnings in excess of twelve thousand dol- 
lars. 

In addition to the older campaigners. Ward also 
has a nice lot of young things to begin work on 
before long, including the four-year-old trotter Beirne 
by Beirne Holt, out of Emily W. 2:10 by James Mad- 
ison, and a number of Dr. Wayo colts and fillies out of 
such mares as Emily W., Lady Madison and El Bel 
Maden. They all show natural trotting qualities and 
Fred will undoubtedly develop some race goers from 
them to take the places of the ones he now uses to 
bring home the winter oats when the days of useful- 
ness of the latter have passed. 

* * * * 

H. W. Brown, who for a good many years was a 
resident of Salt Lake, removed the scene of his 
activities from that city to Los Angeles about three 
months ago, and one of first things he did on landing 
in the city of angels was to buy a half interest from 
C. C. Price in the five-year-old mare Miss Imbro by 
Imbro 2:10V4 and out of that old time race mare 
Miss Williams 2:09>4 by Williams 2:20%. Imbro 
has but few foals in California but this mare makes 
him appear a real son of Zombro as a sire, as last 
season she paced the local track in 2:12, with halves 
in 1:04^4 and eighths in fifteen seconds. Mr. Price 
also has at his home a couple more young things from 
Miss Williams, a bay mare called Miss Carlokin by 
Carlokin 2:07% and a yearling colt by Copa de Oro 
2:01. The Carlokin lass has quite a nice turn of 
speed and has a record of 2:20, taken at the pace 
during the closing days of December a year ago, she 
being one of the last performers of 1914 to "go in 
the book." 

* * * * 

Charles W. Winter, the enterprising Alhambra 
horseman and horseshoer who cut such a wide swath 
at the exposition horse show with that good show 
horse and trotter, Alhambra Prince (3) 2:27, clean- 
ing up all the classes to which he was eligible, makes 
the daily trip in from his home to Exposition Park 
and is getting to be a "regular fellow" when it comes 
to training trotters. The Prince is a son of Redlac 
2:07% and out of the double producer Patti Mack 
(dam also of Alarich 2:09) by George W. McKinney 
2:14%, grandam Alhambra Lily by Idler, and has 
had a letup from training for the past season or so. 
Last year he was bred to a few mares and will be 
allowed a few more this spring, though it is not Mr. 
Winter's intentions to let him do enough stud duty 
to interfere with his training. He has been brought 
along slowly and a few days ago was given an easy 
mile in the same notch as his record, and if he con- 
tinues to come along and stands up well under the 
work he will probably join the Durfee stable later on 
in the season. Mr. Winter also has a three-year-old 
son of the Prince in training, out of Ezelda W. (sister 
to Bertha Frazier trial 2:08%) by Del Coronado 
2:09%, well engaged in the local futurities. Origin- 
ally he was a genuine pasture pacer but when put 
to work acted like he would trot and last season 
worked some very nice fractional parts of the route 
at that gait. Now, however, he has gone back to 
his old way of going and is taking all his exercise as 
a sidewheeler, and a rather promising one, at that. 

Mr. Winter is also handling a couple of young 
things for Alex Grant, the Los Angeles contractor, 
both out of the producing mare Sona 2:16 (dam of 
Cima 2:22, a brand new one for the standard list) by 
McKinney, grandam Nelly K. (dam of four trotters 
including Era 2:10) by General Grant Jr. One is a 
three-year-old black filly, Juanita G. by Escobado 
2:1314, a trotter that worked quarters last season in 
her breaking in forty seconds, and the other is a 



am 



Saturday, January 15, 1916.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5 



two-year-old colt known as Kinsman G., by Wilbur 
Lou (3) 2:10V4, whose get attracted so much atten- 
tion this last season through the excellence of their 
performances. This is a sturdy bay youngster, just 
well broken, with a nice way of going and a frame 
that promises much future development in the way 
of size and individuality. Mr. Grant still owns Sona, 
who is at present in foal to the cover of Copa de Oro, 
and also has at home a yearling full sister to tb« 
Wilbur Lou colt. 

* * * * 

A. Cuthbert, whose winter tarrying place is Pasa- 
dena but whose real home is the Canadian city of 
Toronto, whiles away a good many of the pleasant 
winter days acting in the combined capacities of 
owner, trainer and groomster extraordinary to the 
good pacing mare Dolly Zombro, who has been a 
familiar figure in the matinees and show rings in the 
Pasadena neighborhood for the past few seasons. As 
her name would imply to the initiated, Dolly is a 
daughter of the dead Zombro, whose descendants 
continue to give such good accounts of themselves 
in the hottest kind of company, while her dam is 
Connie by Connor. She has a non winning perform- 
ance record of 2:16V^ made over the two-lap track at 
Riverside at the last fair there, and has traveled 
miles in 2:09 with quarters in :29%, so that she has 
a well developed turn of speed. Mr. Cuthbert, who 
usually makes the European trip in the summer time 
as guide and mentor to touring parties, found Cali- 
fornia much more to his liking last season than his 
customary haunts in war-ridden Europe would have 
been, and has derived a good deal of pleasure and 
much healthful exercise out of the ownership of Dolly 
Zombro. In the spring when the International stable 
ships east he plans to send her along and race over 
the halfmile tracks of eastern Canada, where she 
ought t-o do very nicely. 

* * * * 

J. H. Torrey of Long Beach has three head at the 
Los Angeles track that have all made considerable 
speed, a stallion, a mare, and a son of the pair, very 
much of a family circle. The boss of the bunch is 
the brown horse Baronteer Todd 2:09^1 by Todd 
2:14^'4> dam the great brood mare Bon Bon (dam of 
five) by Baron Wilkes 2:18, grandam Mary A. Whit- 
ney 2:28 (dam of five) by Volunteer .55, etc. — a nice 
line of breeding of which Baronteer Todd is a very 
worthy representative. He has already proven him- 
self, a speed sire and has shown an even greater 
flight of speed than that indicated by the record 
which he annexed at the breeders' meeting at Los 
Angeles last October. The female representative of 
a good family in the Torrey stable is the bay mare 
Bessie T. 2:22 by Zombro 2:11, dam the double pro- 
ducer Manilla by Shadeland Hero. Bessie, now eleven 
years of age, is a most attractive type of the stand- 
ard bred trotter and her record is hardly a fair meas- 
ure of her true speed, as she has a number of authen- 
tic trials to her credit of from 2:10 to 2:12. The 
third member of the string as intimated above, is a 
son of the stallion and mare just mentioned, a five- 
year-old brown horse called .loe Todd, bred by Mr. 
Torrey here in California. Individually he is very 
pleasing and has a fair turn of speed, though he has 
apparently not yet made up his mind whether to be 
a wiggler or a line trotter. He has a good way of 
going at both gaits, and has trotted in 2:28 and paced 
in 2:25. When he flattens he is going to be a useful 
horse, from present indications. 

* ■* * * 

Charles Chick, whose chuck doesn't lay good on his 
stomach unless he has a trotter or so somewhere 
around the place to masticate a little mash, imbibe 
a bit of "h-two-c" and require a certain amount of 
exercise, has a pair of four-year-old geldings in hand 
at present that keep his circulation in good shape 
and give him something to think about. One is by 
Kentucky Todd, and while Charley didn't have the 
lad's pedigree about his clothes at the time of my 
stop at his stable I ran across it in the register after 
my return. His dam is Bow Wow by Libertine 2:21, 
grandam Cactus Bloom by Belsire 2:18, great gran- 
dam Petrea by Belmont 64, fourth dam Petrel by 
Onward 2: 25 '4, fifth dam Cygnet by Harold 413, sixth 
Juliet by Pilot Jr. 12, etc., this certainly being far 
enough back to go to make good Chick's claim that 
his dam was 'sure a well bred mare. Ebc has not 
fully decided what gait suits him best and Charley 
has spent some hard work on him, the present indi- 
cations being that he will eventually wake up and 
find himself a very fair kind of a pacer. The other 
one of the same age and color that keeps him com- 
pany in the stable has no doubts to assail his mind, 



as he has his notions all set to become a trotter. He 
is a nice son of Bon ISIcKinney (3) 2:24'.i and out of 
the dam of Belle Frazier, that trialed in 2:08V6. so 
he has a strong speed inheritance from both sides of 
the house. He was brought along as a three-year-old 
to the point where he could show a thirty clip, and 
is a clean going, level headed young trotter. Bon 
Actor is the name that he gets his meal tickets 
under, and you can watch for the same name to 
appear in the summaries some of these days, well up 
toward the top. 

* * * * 
P. J. Brown, whose connection with the trotter 
dates away back to the time when he had Magna 
Charta 2:33^^ and who later on in life brought out 
that good trotting mare of the late seventies and 
early eighties. Trinket 2:14, is not merely the patri- 
arch of the Los Angeles colony but is one of the 
oldest men in the country actively connected with 
the harness horse. Mr. Brown is getting well along 
towards the sunset of life and physical misfortunes 
have left him weakened in health and bodily 
strength, but the, old spirit is still there and his love 
for the trotter is as keen and true as it was away 
back in the days before most of us were born. Very 
much activity is for him an utter impossibility now- 
adays, but he has a nice two-year-old filly that he 
takes care of personally, and on good days does his 
own driving. She is a nice tempered thing and be- 
haves herself like a little lady for her elderly mentor, 
who says she is as nice gaited a trotter as he ever 
sat behind. She is a nicely bred one, too, and Mr. 
Brown may stay with us long enough to see her at 
the races some day, as she is by Dr. Wayo 2:12yi, a 
good game race horse who is beginning to loom as 
a coming sire of speed, and her dam is Zombretta 
2:15V4 (dam of Good Policy (2) 2: 29 14) by Zombro 
2:11, grandam P'ortune by Dextator 25381. 

iji :ic * * 

Wm. Nesmith, who with his family came to Cali- 
fornia from Missouri a few years ago and brought 
along a number of horses of the Clay Edwin line, 
now has fourteen head of trotters and pacers in all, 
a number of them at Exposition Park and the bal- 
ance at their home. King Lilly Pointer, who is at 
the head of their band, was not at the track but 
from what I heard of him as an individual and from 
the turn of speed that he has shown I would con- 
sider him about the best son of Star Pointer in the 
west. Charley DeRyder bred him at Pleasanton and 
his dam is the Direct mare Lilly S. that trialed for 
Charley in the neighborhood of 2:16, grandam Lily 
Stanley 2:17V^ (dam of three performers and three 
sires) by Whippleton, etc. This fellow has a breed- 
er's record of 2:11, but has worked the Los Angeles 
track in 2:08i/^, with halves in 1:01 '/4, quarters in 
:29i^ and eighths in :14. So far this horse had been 
bred to practically no outside mares, but the Nes- 
miths have raised several foals by him from their 
Clay matrons and now have six of the mares of this 
family due to foal to him within the next sev(>ral 
weeks. I noticed a couple- of very pleasing fillies 
from this cross now in the stable at the park, both 
pacers, one a three-year-old brown lassie that devel- 
oped speed very close to the pacing standard limit 
as a two-year-old, while the other is a black girl, a 
year younger, that paced eighths in eighteen seconds 
when just past the thirteen months old stage. That 
this son of Star Pointer will also breed trotters is 
shown by a couple of two-year-old horse colts by him 
from Clay mares, both of whom are trotters with no 
inclinations, so far, toward pacing. They are nice 
sized, smoothly built and good colored. 

Among the other aged horses to which Mr. Nesnnth 
and his son are devoting their attention are a couple 
of husky geldings that look like they might do to 
take to the races later on, one of them a son of Imbro 
2: 10 'A out of Bedelia Clay by Clay Edwin, and the 
other by Clay Edwin out of a mare by Ayers' Ham- 
bletonian. this one a double gaited boy. The Imbro 
lad is a trotter and worked the Los Angeles track 
at that gait as p three-year-old in 2:30, with halves 
in 1:10, while Happy Clay has both trotted and paced, 
on the same day, in a flat 2:15. Last winter he was 
used as a saddle horse, merely as an evidence of his 
versatility, but he is taking his work now at the trot, 
and it is the intention to continue his development 
at that gait. Mr. Nesmith has another gelding at 
home that will be brought to the track in the near 
future and put in active; training, an inbred Clay 
that has been halves in 1:05 and is a promising 
prospect. 

Prior to Mr. Nesmith's experience with the mem- 
bers of the family of Clay Edwin he had never 



attempted to develop speed among harne.'ss horses, 
and the results obtained from the band he brought 
to California prove two things, that the Clay Edwins 
were endowed by nature with a pronounced trotting 
and pacing instinct and also that Mr. Nesmith is a 
pretty shifty amateur trainer. Every one of the 
Clays that he has handled has shown standard speed 
at one gait or the other, one of the very best ones 
being the mare Julia Clay, a trotter, now ten years 
of age and soon due to foal to the embrace of King 
Lilly Pointer. Three years ago she beat 2:10 for 
her trainer and every season since then has equaled 
or beaten the figures that define the limit of the 
"charmed circle," trotting in 1915 in 2:08>^ some 
time after being bred. Owing to the condition of 
his health, Mr. Nesmith has never been able to take 
advantage of the speed possessed by his horses by 
going to the races with them, but he has built himself 
up to a point now at which he thinks he will be able 
to stand a campaign, and plans to make a number of 
starts over the California tracks during the coming 
season. 

* * * 

One single story is hardly sufficient in which to 
do justice to all of the horses and trainers at Exposi- 
tion Park, and as I have about as much mon> data 
in storage as was used to this point, I think it a 
good time to stop for the present, leaving another 
story of the Angelenos to follow in our issue of Jan- 
uary 22. The horses in the stables of J. W. Cooper, 
Lou Baker, Charley Parker, N. G. Boyd, Henry Pet- 
erson, Railey Macey and Will Durfee remain unmen- 
tioned for the present, but next week will be given 
the attention that is due them. Until then let it be 
a case of "so long, Letty" for the above mentioned 
members of the Los Angeles colony, and don't forget 
the prophecy made in the first of this story — that 
the Southern California bunch will be there with the 
bells on when the time comes to race. — [N.] 
o 

Charley Atkinson, whose friends in California are 
legion and who made his last memorable campaign 
in select company in 1913 with the Del Coronado 
pacing filly Little Bernice, who forced. William to 
pace to his three-year-old record of 2:05 at Peoria 
and later in the same season achieved a winrace 
record of 2:09i/4 over the same course, will handle 
th(^ stable of the well known Michigan horseman. 
T. W. Ready of Niles, during the coming season. 
Charley is already on the job and has some very 
nice things to work on, so the new combination 
should figure pretty extensively in the season's activi- 
ties in the central west. His friends here join us in 
wishing both gentlemen the very best of success. 
In the meantime, Atkinson Junior renuiins in the old 
familiar place with the stable of W. G. Durfee of 
Los Angeles, where he is making good in a very sat- 
isfactory manner. 

o 

"THE LAST LEAF ON THE TREE." 



Just about the time each year that Mr. Knight and 
his corps of able statisticians get the Year Book 
forms about ready to close, along comes the delega- 
tion from Los Angeles with a record meeting that 
t(-ars a hole in the last page of the form, their vale- 
dictory address having been delivered this time on 
Tuesday, December 28 at Exposition Park. Mention 
of the same should have been made in these columns 
last week, save for the fact that the editor was out 
joy riding in Southern California his own self and 
did not get back to work until the paper had duly 
made its appearance. However, "niieux tarde (|Ue 
jamais," whicli, translated into tlie Milwaukee dialect 
of the language that the whole world will have to 
learn if the plans of Kaiser Bill do not miscarry, 
means practically tlie same as "besser spaet als 
nimnier," or words to that effect. Anyway, let it go 
at that. 

The meeting, which was purely of the breeders' 
variety, was staged imder the rules of the N. T. A., 
of whicli the Los Angeles Harness Horse Association 
is a member, was the means of adding four brand new 
performers to the standard list, while one three-year- 
old trotler made a material cut in the figures that 
followed his name as a two-year-old. James Stewart, 
Park Kelley. Harry Messmore and Will Durfee all 
performed as drivers for the occasion, while Secre- 
tary E. J. Delorey officiated as starter, with Dave 
Stewart, Thomas (ioldsmith and W. R. Thomas look- 
ing to the enforcement of the rules, and Charley 
Nickerson, L. E. McLellan and Railey Macey cnlching 
the time. The story of the day la told n full by the 
following summary: 

Ijfw AiiKi'Ic.x. Tiii.Mtlny, Drccmbcr 28, \W>. 

Ti) bent 2:2.'>',i pnrliiK: 
Koberl Unicc. rh c; (1) by Copa rte Oro 2:01 — 

Ka.stcr D. (2) 2:IS',4 by Diablo 2:09y*. . (Stewnrl) 2:22',4 

To bent 2:30 '4 trottlnR: 
Cinin. b m (8) bv Limonero 2:15%— Sona 2:ir> by 

MrKiMn<!y 2:11 % (Kolloy) 2:22 

To bent 2:30'A trottlnff: 
Mnmii-llto, rh v (2) bv Mnnrico (3) 2:0714— My Irene 

(2) 2:28'Vi bv PctlRru 2:10V4 (Durfc-c) 2:24'/4 

Ti> b<'(il 2:3iH/4 troltlnt?: 
StJibe. b m («) by Limonero 2:15% — Tholmn by 

Zolock 2:'i.'i>4 (MeHHtnon') 2:25 

To b.iit 2:1!) trottlnK: 
Cnrl. bl K (3) by Carlokin 2:n7V4— My Ircno H. (2) 

2:28% by Pctlgru 2:10^4 (Durfee) 2:14% 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 15, 1916. 



Thad Stevens' Most Famous Race, 1873 



Since the revival of thoroughbred racing here in 
California last summer by the gentlemen composing 
the Golden Gate Thoroughbred Breeders' Associa- 
tion and the more recent inauguration of the same 
brand of contests at the plant of the Lower California 
Jockey Club at Tia Juana, we have had a number of 
inquiries at this office for information concerning the 
famous four mile heat races contested in the seven- 
ties at local tracks in both of which Thad Stevens 
was the winner. Interest has centered especially in 
the race at the old Ocean House track in this city 
during the course of which True Blue suffered an 
accident that retired him from the contest, after he 
had won the second heat, and we have had so many 
inquiries that we reproduce herewith the story of the 
race. Thad Stevens, the winner, was a son of Lang- 
ford, the first thoroughbred foaled on California soil, 
and Mary Chilton by imp. Glencoe, being foaled here 
in California in 1865; Joe Daniels, foaled in 1869, was 
by imp. Australian out of Dolly Carter by imp. Glen- 
coe; True Blue, foaled in 1869, was a son of Lexing- 
ton and Balloon l.y imp. Yorkshire, while Mamie Hall, 
foaled in California in 186C, was by Norfolk and out 
of Miama by Williamson's Belmont, the grandsire of 
Thad Stevens. The following story is from an ac- 
count written at the time of the race, Nov. 15, 1973: 



Never since the first introduction of horse-racing 
into this state have its residents been so excited over 
a race as they have been today over the great four- 
mile heat race. Nor can one wonder at the interest 
taken in it, for was not a California bred horse to 
contend against two of the very best horses from 
the East? One the son of the grandest four-mile 
horse that ever looked through a bridle (Lexington), 
and the other a son of imp. Australian, in whom was 
combined the best blood of the English turf. Added 
to the natural interest thereby engendered, the day 
was one of the most delightful of the season, and one 
peculiarly Californian. A mellow haze enveloped the 
surrounding hills, while a gentle breeze from off the 
Pacific toned the atmosphere to a refreshing tempera- 
ture, added to wliich the music of the surf as it 
rolled in. nearly touching the western extremity of 
the track, made the scene one of almost inexpressible 
grandeur. By twelve o'clock the grand rush had 
fairly set in, and a dense column of horse, foot, and 
carriages streamed steadily over the hill and down 
the avenue leading to Ocean Park. Every available 
means of conveyance appeared to have been brought 
into service — from a four-in-hand drag to a rickety 
cart of the vegetable peddler. Thousands of per.sons 
came by the trains of the San Jose railroad and 
walked the intervening distance of a mile. Within 
the park the scene was fairly suggestive of the Eng- 
lish Derby day. Hundreds of aristocratic establish- 
ments were crowded together, occupied by gay vota- 
ries of fashion, who discussed the probability of the 
approaching race with animation and the contents of 
their hampers with equal earnestness. The hackmen 
are charging $40 a load from the city, customers 
finding their own conveyance back. The great specu- 
lator offered the managers of the race $5,000 for the 
receipts of the gate, independent of the receipts of 
the stands and extras. The offer was refused. True 
Blue, Thad Stevens, Joe Daniels and Mamie Hall 
were moderately exercised this morning, and ap- 
peared to be in excellent condition. The friends and 
supporters of True Blue remarked from time to time 
that the horse was a little stiff about the knees and 
lacked the desired amount of lustre in his eyes — a 
statement that was invariably received with signifi- 
cant winks, nods. etc.. by the keen adepts in matters 
pertaining to the turf. The true state of affairs was 
shrouded with a suspicious mystery that the race 
alone could explain to the uninitiated. The gossip 
of the stables failed to contain any point of interest 
other than the report that the owner of True Blue 
depended upon distancing Thad Stevens in the first 
heat, and failing in this he had serious doubts of 
winning the contest. 

At 1 p. m. the grounds presented a dazzling scene 
of animation. The proportions of the ground had 
swollen with marvelous rapidity, and there was at 
least 10,000 people on the course. The main road 
leading thereto was hidden for a mile by a cloud of 
dust, and a continuous procession of buggies poured 
steadily down the hill to the east. The pool-selling 
was commenced at noon, and opened briskly at large 
figures in the two hours that intervened before the 
horses were called. A heavy sum was deposited in 
the banks for cashing pools, the sum of which was 
between $40,000 and $50,000. Thad Stevens was the 
favorite by greatly increased odds. A report indus- 
triously circulated that True Blue had exhibited 
symptoms of stiffness may have had some influence, 
but the confidence in the California favorite was still 
very strong. The ratio in pools between Thad Stev- 
ens and True Blue at that hour (1 p. m.) was nearly 
three to one. The following shows the average pools 
an hour before calling the horses: 



Thad Stevens $260 $275 $325 $300 $325 

True Blue 165 152 165 165 155 

Joe Daniels 105 100 90 80 75 

Mamie Hall 10 9 8 5 5 

A strong detachment of police under command of 
Captain Douglass maintained order in the vast assem- 
blage, a portion of the men being mounted. In addi- 
tion to the great crowd in the park, hundreds of 
gratuitous spectators took positions on the neighbor- 
ing hills, where a view of the course could be ob- 
tained. At fifty-five minutes past 1 p. m. the alarm 
of fire was sounded by a series of yells proceeding 
from the grand stand adjoining the eastern end of 
the refreshment saloon near the course, and soon the 
smoke rolled up in dense volumes. A scene of intense 
excitement ensued, the crowd shouted lustily, the 
shrill whistles of the police increased the nervous- 
ness of susceptible persons, and for a few moments 
a terrible catastrophe was imminent. A few cool 
men, however, wrested the burning planks from the 
building and stamped on the fire, and the event soon 
passed from the mind as scarcely worthy of notice 
on an occasion so prolific of interest. The fire orig- 
inted in the cook-house of the saloon. The damage 
was trifling. At half past 1 p. m. at a moderate 
estimate there was upwards of 12,000 people in the 
park and immediate vicinity, and the enormous seat- 
ing accommodations were almost entirely occupied 
at an extra charge, while thousands occupied the 
vehicles in the field. 

First Heat. — Promptly at the call Thad Stevens, 
Joe Daniels, True Blue and Mamie Hall went to the 
post. At the signal Mamie Hall jumped off with the 
lead and held on for the first mile, with Thad Stev- 
ens running second. True Blue third, and Joe Daniels 
fourth. In the second mile True Blue took the lead 
and held it to the fourth mile, when Joe Daniels, who 
had been trailing, made play for the lead, and after 
a fine brush with True Blue, took it, winning the heat 
by two lengths in 7:45, True Blue second, Thad Stev- 
ens third, and Mamie Hall last. The unexpected turn 
of the first heat produced an excitement that could 
only find vent at the pools, and consequently the 
sales sprang to a high figure. Pending the disposi- 
tion of the second heat, the friends of Thad Stevens 
rallied promi)tly to his support and freely backed 
their opinion of his speed and endurance with coin, 
the impression prevailing that the rider of Thad held 
him in during the entire heat and simply strove not 
to be distanced. The horse was in fine condition 
when he left the track, and was applauded as vigor- 
ously as though the winner of the race. In one of 
the first pools sold Thad Stevens was taken as first 
choice for $2,100. Joe Daniels bringing $1,500, True 
Blue $800, Mamie Hall having been withdrawn, she 
being badly blown. The pools continued large, and 
heavy sums of money found their way into the box, 
they averaging from $1,500 to $3,000. 

Second Heat. — The horses were called for the sec- 
ond heat at a quarter to four, and the preliminary 
rubbing down and saddling having been accom- 
plished, at five minutes to four another excellent 
start was made, the three horses passing the score 
even. Before reaching the half-mile Thad had pulled 
out ahead three lengths, True Blue following, and at 
the end of the first mile Thad crossed the score three 
lengths ahead, True Blue second, and Daniels lagging 
five lengths. On the second mile the relative posi- 
tions of the horses were about the same, Thad gain- 
ing a few yards, if anything. On the third mile all 
of the horses crossed the score in close company, 
Thad a neck ahead of True Blue, with Daniels lapping 
on the flank. On the fourth mile Thad and True Blue 
began a neck-and-neck struggle, with .Joe Daniels 
close up. In the last half True Blue shoved ahead 
and opened up a gap of five lengths, which he held in 
crossing the score, Thad Stevens being seven lengths 
behind Joe Daniels. Time, 8:08. 

Pool-selling was again resumed, and a number of 
heavy pools sold, in all of which True Blue was the 
choice, with the second choice alternating between 
Thad Stevens and Joe Daniels, True Blue selling at 
about four to three for the others. 

Third Heat. — The horses were called for the third 
heat at about half-past 4, and got off in good style at 
twenty-five minutes to 5. Thad took the lead again 
and pulled out handsomely a couple of lengths before 
reaching the first quarter, with True Blue second. 
Thad held his own through the first mile and crossed 
the score two lengths ahead, True Blue and Daniels 
running neck-and-neck. The second mile was a close 
run between the three. They crossed the score in 
almost precisely the same order as in the first mile. 
The third mile was a repetition of the first and sec- 
ond. They crossed the score as follows: Thad Stev- 
ens leading, Joe Daniels lapping him, and True Blue 
a close third. At the first quarter of the fourth mile 
True Blue quit and fell behind, and was speedily lost 
in the distance. Thad Stevens pulled out at his best, 
and parting company with Daniels, crossed the score 
nearly ten lengths ahead in 7:57, with True Blue 
distanced. The excitement was tremendous at this 
result. Deafening cheers ascended, and the air was 
filled with flying hats, as the race was now between 
Thad Stevens and Joe Daniels, and consequently 
looked upon as a sure thing for the California horse. 
But amid the joy intelligence was received from up 
the track that True Blue had broken his leg and was 



a ruined horse. He was lying disabled on the track, 
about midway between the first quarter and the half- 
mile pole. The noble animal was removed from the 
track and the course cleared for the final heat, with 
Thad Stevens the favorite at 100 to 20 over Joe 
Daniels. 

Fourth Heat. — It was almost dark when the horses 
got the word for the fourth and deciding heat. They 
made a capital start, Thad Stevens at once taking 
the lead, and as they disappeared in the gloom the 
old horse was leading by fully five lengths, an advan- 
tage he held all through the heat, Joe never once 
being able to overtake him, the result being that Thad 
won the heat and race in 7:46, which is remarkable 
time, considering the distance he had run. 

The best of order prevailed and the city is jubilant 
over California's triumph. It is not unlikely that 
Thad Stevens will be sent East during the coming 
season to contend with the "cracks" of Kentucky and 
New York in their own strongholds. Mr. Chamber- 
lain, the owner of True Blue, says he believes the 
horse permanently disabled as a racer by the acci- 
dent. Various conjectures have been made as to the 
manner in which the accident occurred, but no one 
knows certainly. It is generally believed the horse 
must have got his foot into a hole made by a gopher. 
True Blue was at his stable next day, very stiff and 
lame. 

The winner, Thad Stevens, who has so suddenly 
become historical as the best four-mile-heat horse in 
America, was bred in California in the year 1865, 
consequently he is now eight years old. He is by 
Langford, out of Mary Chilton, she by imported Glen- 
coe, out of an American Eclipse mare; grandam 
Queen Mary by Bertrand. Consequently, he is, on his 
dam's side of the same family as Longfellow, Lyttle- 
ton. Extra, Fadladeen, Allie Hunt, Woodpecker, etc. 
He is described as a chestnut sorrel with one white 
hind foot, and stands about fifteen two or three high. 
As a runner he first appeared on the California turf 
in 1870, with but little success. In 1871 he won sev- 
eral races of one-mile and two-mile heats. In 1872 
he began on New Year's day by being beaten in a 
race of mile heats three in five, by Pillbox, after win- 
ning the first heat in l:54Vi, and making the fourth 
a dead heat in the same time, he running second in 
each of the others. On the .'^Ist of January he turned 
the tables on Pillbox in a similar race, winning the 
third, fourth and fifth heats in l:50Vt. 1:51'/^ and 
1:49?4. On the 8th of June, over the Oakland track 
(the others having been run over the Agricultural 
Park track), he was beaten by Irene Harding in 
three straight heats, in 1:48%, 1:48 and 1:47%; but 
on the 22d he defeated her, winning the first, third 
and fourth heats in l:51i^, 1:47% and 1:49, Irene 
winning the second heat in 1:45%. On September 24, 
over the Union Park course, Sacramento, in a race 
of two-mile heats, he won the third and fourth heats 
in 3:41Vi and 3:45Vi, beating Nettie Brown, Irene 
Harding, Alice May and Modesto, Nettie Brown wan- 
ning the first heat in 3:40V,. At one time it was con- 
templated to enter him for the $20,000 purse race to 
have taken place at New Orleans, La., last spring; 
but the Ijouisiana Jockey Club withdrawing the 
purse, all idea of sending him east was given up. 
He has run several good races this year, but none 
better than his race of mile heats at Sacramento on 
the 5th of July, when he won the third, fourth and 
fifth heats in l:43Vi, 1:461/2 and 1:45. Thornhill win- 
ning the first two heats in 1:43 and 1:43. Nell Fla- 
herty running second and third in all the heats. His 
last grand performance previous to the 15th was his 
race of four-mile heats on the 18th of October, when 
he beat Joe Daniels, Ballot Box, Irene Harding, Tar- 
get and Kate Gift, Thad winning the second and 
third heats in 7:30 and 7:43. Joe Daniels winning the 
first heat in 7:42%, the time for the second being 
the best for a second heat on record. 

o 

A SMALL BOOK WITH A BIG PURPOSE. 



During the editor's recent absence in Southern 
California there arrived on his deck a nicely printed 
little booklet entitled "Statement of Fact and Scien- 
tific Truth." from the pen of Louis Petersen, the well 
known farrier of Santa Ana. who has devoted to the 
welfare of the horse's foot the thought and study of 
a lifetime. When a man starts in to do anything we 
always like to see him lay out a good task for him- 
self, and in going at the work of preparing his latest 
booklet. Mr. Petersen has certainly "matched him- 
self" against three mighty adversaries, it being writ- 
ten, in his own language, "with the object to prevent 
lame horses, divorces and wars." Being, perforce of 
circumstances, a bachelor and, by natural inclina- 
tions, devoid of the martial inclinations that have 
added so much glory and renown to the name of our 
friend and fellow turf writer, Joseph I. Markey, we 
are not in a position to speak with authority concern- 
ing those portions devoted to the prevention of 
divorce and war, but there is much written concern- 
ing the lameness in horses that appeals to us as 
sound matter concerning a very practical, everyday 
sort of a subject in which very many people are 
vitally interested, be they single or marj-ied. warlike 
or peaceful. The booklet is put together in plain, 
forceful, understandable language, and the time 
spent in its reading will not prove devoid of either 
interest or enlightenment. It may be obtained from 
Mr. Petersen by mail at a very moderate cost and 
we recommend it to your consideration. 

o 

Remember, the Breeders' Futurity closes Feb. first. 



Saturday, January 15, 1916.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



t NOTES and NEWS { 

• ? 

i ? 
i 

Cima 2:22. 
Stabe 2:25. 
Manuelito (2) 2:24i^. 
Robert Bruce (1) 2:22i^. 
Are all newcomers to the standard list. 
It happened at Los Angeles on December 28. 
^■^<$> 

While Carl reduced his record to 2: 14 1,4 at the 
same time. 

<S><?><S> 

And down at Hanford last Sunday at a matinee 
the bovs raced halfniile heats as fast as 1:08. 
<S><S>^ 

Not really so worse even for California at this 
season of the year. 

•<$><$><^ 

Having contributed the first two-ten trotter for the 
season of 1915 and also the last standard performers, 
our horsemen can now settle down for the work of 
getting ready for 1916, remembering that this little 
record of their achievements in 1915 must be lived 
up to or surpassed during the present year: 
<?><8><8> 

World's champion yearling trotting filly — Anselila 
2:171^. 

World's champion yearling trotting gelding — Anse- 
lot 2:281^. 

World's champion yearling trotting filly, halfmile 
track, Verbena Ansel 2:26. 

World's champion three-year-old pacing gelding — 
Rayo de Oro 2: 07 14. 

Season's fastest four-year-old racing pacing geld- 
ing—John Malcolm 2:09%. 

Season's fastest two-year-old pacing filly — Verna 
McKinney 2:13. 

Season's fastest two-year-old pacing colt — Rico 
2:1214. . 

Season's fastest new trotting gelding — Spriggan 
2:0814. 

Season's fastest four-year-old trotting gelding — Bon 
Courage 2: 08 1/2. 

Season's fastest four-year-old racing trotting geld- 
ing—Future Tramp 2:091,4. 

Season's four-year-old racing trotting filly- — Miss 
Perfection 2:08i^. 

<s><S><S> 

It is rather a generous order, folks, but what man 
has done, man can do again, so go up against the bit 
in earnest. 

«><?><8> 

Robert Bruce (1) 2:22i^, who appears in the list 
at the head of the column, is a full brother to Rayo 
de Oro (3) 2:0714. 

^^<$> 

While Manuelito (2) 2:24% is another one to add 
to Will Durfee's evidence in support of his idea that 
My Irene S. (2) 2: 28 -'4. now twelve years of age 
and the dam of eight living foals, five of which are 
standard performers, is one of the most wonderful 
young matrons in the land. 

Robert Smith, father of "our Bob," who died De- 
cember 30 at his home in Philadelphia at the age of 
eighty-two, was a lifelong friend of the trotter, ex- 
plaining the source from which the love of the horse 
evidenced by Robert Junior had its inception. In 
the course of a long and useful life he had owned a 
number of horses of more or less note, including 
Genevieve 2:l?,\i^ an excellent trotter of the nineties, 
and was for years a member of the Belmont Park 
and Point Breeze driving clubs. 

Walter Maben, one of the most successful colt 
trainers in the west, is taking things easy this winter 
at his home in Los Angeles, and for once in his life 
is "afoot," so far as having anything to train is con- 
cerned. Let things begin to pick up a little, however, 
and Walter will be found in the training cart as of 
old, as he is merely resting while waiting to see just 
what is going to develop in the future. One of his 
last and most successful tasks was the giving of first 
lessons in trotting to the filly Anselila, who gave 
such eloquent testimony to the excellence of her 
early training by trotting to the world's record for 
yearling fillies. Walter has all the appearance of a 
steed to whom the letup has been highly beneficial, 
and finds the leisure time very enjoyable after the 
former strenuous seasons that he has been through. 

Charley DeRyder is among the numerous members 
of the trotting horse fraternity who have been taking 
in the running meeting at Tia Juana, the big boss of 
the Pleasanton Driving Park even sporting an entry 
in a number of the races, though to this time the 
bird's name has failed to appear with the brackets. 
Up at Pleasanton she was known simply as "Ryan's 
filly," George usually being her pilot in her many 
miles traveled as a prompter to the various members 
of the MacKenzie stable, but down at Tia Juana she 
broke into print under the appellation of Right Smart. 
There is a rumor that she got a right smart play at 
one of her first starts, but it was a bum steer. Inci- 
dentally, Mr. and Mrs. DeRyder have been having 
the first real vacation that has come their way in 
many a long month, and are getting some genuine 
pleasure from it. 



W. F. Whittier is spending several days in the 
Hemet Valley, looking after his varied interests there 
and incidentally taking advantage of the occasion to 
put in as much time as possible at Hemet Stock 
Farm, watching the Wilbur Lou youngsters take their 
kindergarten lessons. 

Articles of incorporation of the Palo Alto Stock 
Farms were filed with Secretary of State Jordan 
Wednesday. Herbert Fleishhacker, president of the 
Anglo-California Bank of San Francisco: Edgar Sin- 
sheimer, C. F. Hunt and J. V. McKinstry, all of San 
Francisco, and Myron H. Tichenor of Palo Alto, are 
the promoters of the company, which has leased a 
large acreage of the famous old Palo Alto establish- 
ment of Governor Stanford to be used as a stock 
and dairy farm. 

-«><S><S> 

Clarence J. Berry tore himself away from his 
accustomed haunts in this city last week long enough 
to make a short trip to Los Angeles, where his futu- 
rity prospects and Grand Circuit candidates are 
wintering in the care of Will Durfeo. The editor of 
this paper left the city of all the angels on the same 
day that C. J. landed there, but was witli him long 
enough to hear his most gracefully and positively 
decline a bona fide offer of ten thousand dollars for 
Virginia Barnette. Here is the situation in a nut- 
shell: The genial Alaskan knows several places 
where he can make ten thousand dollars in a rea- 
sonable length of time but does not know just where 
or how he could get another Virginia. All things are 
very simple if you understand them. He came back 
home early in the week very well pleased with the 
way all the horses are wintering, and enthusiastic 
over the outlook for an enjoyable season in 1916. 
<S><S>«> 

T. W. Stiles of New Haven, Conn., who has a 
winter home in Southern California, arrived there 
several days ago and has been among the frequent 
visitors to the horsemen's colony at Exposition 
Park. On the occasion of his last visit, Mr. Stiles, 
who is a partner in the racing stable handled by Ed 
Gillies under the name of the Clay-Cotton Stable, 
purchased from W. G. Durfee and Gen. C. C. Watts 
the trotting filly Josephine Watts (3) 2:09% by Gen. 
Watts (3) 2:06%, shipping her direct to his stable 
in Connecticut. Last season she was raced over the 
eastern halfmile tracks, and while hardly at herself 
early in the year rounded into nice shape later and 
made a very good showing. At the Chicago sale Mr. 
Stiles acquired the former Durfee trotter Sargo 
2:07% and will use him over the eastern two-lappers 
this year, while it is not improbable that he will 
make another purchase or so locally before going 
east in the spring. 

Samuel J. Fleming of Terre Haute, Indiana, for 
many, many years one of the most widely known 
and successful tiotting horse breeders and campaign- 
ers in this country, died quite recently at his home, 
well along in years. Mr. Fleming and his son. Dr. 
Charles I. Fleming, conducted the family breeding 
operations in partnership, though the elder member 
did the greater part of the training and practically 
all of the campaigning. Their Indiana farm was long 
the home of the geod trotter and speed sire, Mar- 
grave 2:15% and his full brother Baron Review 
2:2114. both progenitors of extreme trotting speed, 
the latter horse still being owned at the Fleming 
establishment. "Sam" Fleming, as he was known to 
horsemen of all ages and conditions, was a familiar 
figure on both the major and minor tracks of the 
central west and east, and rarely went to the races 
that he did not have something worth while, one of 
the most memorable of his Campaigns in the last 
several years being the one made with the black 
pacer John M., who wOn sixteen straight races in the 
season of 1903, never losing a start, and eventually 
raced to a record of 2:02%. Many other famous 
horses have been bred, developed and raced to fast 
records by Mr. Fleming in the long time that he has 
been identified with the harness horse industry, and 
his place in the ranks of Indiana breeders will be 
a hard one to fill. 

<«><?>«> 

A. B. Spooner of San Luis Obispo, who with his 
sons owns and operates some eight thousand acres 
of ranch land along the coast near that city, includ- 
ing the choicest portion of the old Pecho grant, was 
among the recent welcome visitors to this office. 
While harness hore breeding is practically at a 
standstill in his community, Mr. Spooner still raises 
a few and has at present a very promising two-year- 
old filly that is just being broken, a full sister to the 
pacer Bay Jeff that trialed at Los Angeles a few 
seasons ago in 2:01%, her sire and dam, Morris A. 
and San Luis Belle, as well as a couple of aged sis- 
ters never trained for speed, also being owned at the 
same establishment. Morris A., who is the sire of 
the fast pacer Choro Prince 2:08%, gets very few 
trotting mares at his court, but is siring some most 
useful general purpose animals from the ordinary 
run of mares, the Spooners finding them especially 
useful for riding purposes over their ranges. Quite 
a dairy herd is maintained at the ranch in addition 
to the range cattle, and grain farming is conducted 
on a pretty fair scale, so the father and the boys 
iTianage to keep fairly busy. Mr. Spooner really had 
very little reason for the last trip to San Francisco, 
coming up merely to charter a steamer to make the 
trip to their private landing and take on some four 
thousand sacks of barley (you read It riiiht, four 
thousand sacks) produced on the ranch this year. 
How annoyingi Yes? 



MID-WINTER MATINEE AT HANFORD. 



Hanford. Cal., Jan. 10, 1916. 
A card of three harness events and a running 
race made up the program of the second matinee 
given by local horsemen at the Kings County Fair 
Grounds yesterday. Unfavorable weather conditions 
prevailed; some rain f(>ll during the afternoon but 
did not dampen the enthusiasm of the crowd of some 
two hundred people that were in attendance. Each 
event was well contested and exciting finishes were 
quite frequent. Firebaugh, a Fresno horse, won the 
free-for-all pace from Julius Caesar with Allie Glen a 
close third. The two-tliirty trot went to the magnifi- 
cent son of Best Policy, King Policy, whose faultless 
gait has caught the eye of our railbirds. The two- 
year-old pace produced a pretty good race, the first 
heat seeing a nose-to-nose finish between Queen Mona 
and Ira Basler. The veteran trainer and driver, Mr. 
Jake Broiller, took the mount behind Ira Basler in 
the second heat and led to a hundred yards of the 
wire. Queen Mona won the heat and race in an ex- 
citing finish. The halfmile dash was won by Pearl 
from Johnnie White by a head. The summaries: 

Free-for-all pace (halfmile hent.s): 

FirebauKh (Rurk.s) 1 1 

Juliu.s Caesar (Smith) 2 2 

Allie Glen (Lavine) 3 3 

Time— 1:12, 1:08. 

2:30 trot: 

King Policy .; (Lepett) 1 1 

Zip McKinney (Burks) 2 2 

Mountaineer (Senter) 3 4 

Dexter \V (Lavine) 4 3 

Time— 1:15. 1:1.5. 
Two-ye.ar-old pace: 

Queen Mona (Owen.s) 1 1 

Ira Rasler (Perry- Broiller) 2 2 

Stone Direct (Gallup) 3 3 

Mollie 2nci (Legett) 4 4 

Time— 1:141^, l:13i4. 

O 

THAT DURFEE "CHAIN GANG." 



"Boss," said Little Henry Atkinson to Deputy 
Sheriff Willie Durfee one day last week at Los Ange- 
les, "that sod has got to come off the terrace at the 
flower beds so we can sow some seed and get a stand 
of real grass. How about it?" 

"Sure," said D. S. W. D., just like that, "good idea 
whenever we can get the help." Then he leaned back 
in his office chair at the track at Exposition Park 
and as his thumbs sought a comfortable hanging 
place in the armholes of his vest his left fingers 
accidentally brushed the nice little badge that Los 
Angeles county says he can wear so long as the pres- 
ent officials stay in office. "This thing might just as 
well be useful as so darned ornamental." mused D. S. 
W. D.. just like that, and he called to Henry to rustle 
the proper tools while he himself rustled some men 
to wield them, which to a man in his official capacity 
ought to be a fairly simple matter. 

It was simple, too, when he really got down to 
work. 

The first culprit he impressed was the well known 
International speed impresario, Railey W. Macey, 
who was sent to the chain gang on an indefinite 
sentence charged with having filched the 1915 coast 
record for a public performance with Power Patch 
as his accessory away back in October, the said D. S. 
W. D. being no respecter of the statute of limitations, 
at least not when the flower bed needed men to 
work on it. 

Frederick Ward, having the misfortune to round 
into view about this time, was made the second vic- 
tim of the pressing needs of the posey patch, 
charged with conspiracy to win all the slow trots in 
the short grass circuit last s(>ason with th(> trotter 
Great North(>rn, the complaint being lodged at the 
instigation of a number of horsemen from the other 
side of the mountains. 

Just as he had gotten Ward in tow, there came a 
wireless from Barney Barnes in Winnipeg accusing 
Watt ('Cleveland of using one-workout-steel last winter 
on Strathtell wh(>n Barney had especially specified 
that metal be used that would stand off the pony 
pacer for at least two weeks, so that luckless farrier 
was also added to the bunch. Henry was being 
hard-put to find tools enough to supply all the vic- 
tims of the Durfee activities by this time, but had 
to rustle one more rake for the use of Ike Lipson of 
Tulare, who had violat<'d all the accepted rules and 
regulations for the conduct of both native sons and 
professional Californians by absenting himself from 
our glorious clime for over three consecutive weeks, 
owing to his trip to the Chicago sale and then on to 
New York city. Ike begged hard and plead<>d that 
he had already been sufficiently punished, but the 
will of D. R. W. D. was adamant and Isaac went to 
it with the bunch. 

Then Little Henry got his. By some sad error he 
had rounded up one extra tool and Durfee, recalling 
the fact Dial on that very morning the said Henry 
had refunded thirty dollars of expense money out of 
two hundred with which he had been furnished six 
weeks or more ago, very promptly made him go 
to it with the other criminals, any stable manager 
that cannot get away with thirty bucks in twice as 
many days laying himself wide open to suspicion on 
general grounds. 

Then the camera man flock shot the bunch, includ- 
ini; tlie said 1). S. W. D., who will be readily recog- 
nized by his badge of authority and his air of indo- 
lent ease. Why worry or work when you can get a 
good gang like this to do the sweating? 

Truly, this thing of being a deputy sheriff has its 
convenient features — in Los Angeles county. In the 
mountains of Kentucky it's a different matter. 



a- 

TRAPSHOOTING BOOMING ON COAST. 



Soon the season for live same huntins will be over 
and the lovers of the sun will divert their attention 
to trapshooting, appropriately termed "The Sport 
Allurins." On about the middle of next month the 
various clubs alons the Pacific Coast will commence 
to schedule events and the fun will run continuously 
until late in November. 

In the history of sports it is doubtful if any pas- 
time has made greater progress in recent years than 
has trapshootina. This is especially true on the 
Pacific Coast. Not so many years back there were 
only a few clubs scattered here and there while 
today there are 250 recognized organizations in Cali- 
fornia. Oregon, Washington, Nevada and Arizona. 
The explanation is that it is an outdoor sport that 
has proved fascinating to women and children as 
well as men. The growing interest of the fair sex 
has exerted an influence that is bound to make the 
sport prosper and flourish. Men from all walks of 
life have become interested and it is this democratic 
condition that has made the appeal. 

Steel nerves, quick and unerring judgment and 
unfaltering action are required by your skilled trap- 
shooter. Science to an extreme degree is needed for 
high scores. The public at large will eventually 
appreciate trapshooting and thus establish it with 
the leading sports of America. The recreation is not 
limited to this country by any means. Fact is, it has 
given competition to the racing game in recent years 
as "The Sport of Kings." Practically all the crowned 
heads of Europe are devotees of the traps. 

We, however, do not intend to go into a history of 
trapshooting for it is too firmly established and 
known for that purpose. What we are pointing out 
is the growth of the pastime on the Pacific Coast. 
There is none better qualified to tel! of this than 
Clarence A. Haight. Billy Price and others of the 
pioneer guard of trapsliooters refer to liim as the 
"Father of the Sport in the Far West." In matter 
of actual experience and work in behalf of the fascin- 
ating game they cannot be far wrong for it was back 
in the Eighties when he was banging away at clay 
pigeons and enjoying his young self. 

"I regret to say that there are few if any of the 
boys active at present who used to make up the 
parties at the traps of the old Lincoln Gun Club," 
says Mr. Haight. "That was back in 1888 when the 
club's grounds were down at Colma. In those days 
we used a common brick-colored clay pigeon. Still 
we used to have the same old recreation and enjoyed 
the sport. Shortly afterwards the club moved to 
Alameda, where events were held practically every 
week in the year until 1901. 

Giant strides have been made in the improvement 
of trapshooting. In the first place, it has grown to 
wonderful proportions and more interest is attached 
to it. The equipment has been made modern. The 
blue rocks put in an appearance and all down the 
line improvements hav(> been coming steadily. I 
have confidence that the coming year will keep pace 
with those just gone. The sport is bound to take 
hold and I look to the day w-hen it will class with 
baseball as the national pastime." 

Clarence A. Haight follows this up with a bit of 
news that will be received with pleasure by Coast 
shots. It is to the effect that the Interstate Trap- 
shooting Association has decided to reconsider the 
action at its recent meeting in not alloting a Pacific 
Coast handicap tournament. The Portland Gun Club 
has filed application to hold the fixture, some time in 
August, and in all likelihood it will be granted. This 
is considered just inasmuch as the Coast classic was 
staged at San Diego, Cal., in the southern part of the 
territory, last season. A movement is already on 
foot to programme a banner array of events to at- 
tract all of the crack shots from the Coast points. 

In the next couple of weeks the gun clubs will 
commence work for staging an auspicious opening. 
Among the many big organizations that will get 
under way are the Golden Gate, and Bay View clubs 
of Alam(>da: San Jose and Garden City clubs of San 
Jose: Vallejo Gun Club: Moraga Club of Contra 
county; Big Time Club of Sacramento; Stockton 
Club, Fresno Club; Alhambra Club of Martinez; Al- 
turas Club, Venice Club, San Diego Club, Vernon 
Club, Family Club of Menlo Park, San Bernardino 
Club, Long Beach Club, Hollister Club and a hundred 
others in different parts along the Coast. 

Prospects are for a big season in 1916. While 
Hugh O. Poslon was in Sacramento during the week 
he gave evidence of his faith in the sport by the fol- 
lowing interview in the Sacramento Unipn: 

"California is to see a remarkable increase of 
trapshooting this season, according to Hugh E. Pos- 
ton of the Hercules Powder Company, who was at 
the Sacramento hotel yesterday. He bases his pre- 
diction on the inquiries being received from the 
scatter gun men the state over. 

"Poston's explanation of the increasing interest in 
trap work is that game is getting so scarce it is 
harder and more expensive each year to secure any 
decent shooting. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



■a 

i 
i 

t 

T 

? 

? 
• 

• 
t 

"Throughout the Tnited States there has been a 
remarkable increase during the last few years in 
those addicted to the clay pigeon game, but the trap 
enthusiasm has not progressed as rapidly in this 
State as elsewhere, due to the abundant game supply 
of the past." 

o — 

OLDEST GUN CLUB IN UNITED STATES IS 
LOCATED IN SAN FRANCISCO. 



San Francisco claims the honor of possessing one 
of the oldest gun clubs in the United States, if not 
in the world. It is the California Wing Shooting 
Club. Back in 1873 it was organized and has existed 
ever since. At present its membership consists of 
thirty-five, who are active throughout the season. The 
California Wing Shooting Club's grounds have been 
located at Sobrante on the Bay Shore but a new spot 
will be secured inside the next couple of months. 
The club has brought out a number of fine shots, 
some of whom have shown their skill in England, 
France, Belgium, Italy, Monte Carlo and other Euro- 
pean countries. 

o 

INTEREST IN RIFLE SHOOTING. 



Washington, D. C. — At the present time there is 
an unprecedented revival on throughout the country 
in rifle shooting, brought about by the enactment of 
a law by Congress last year authorizing the free 
issue of rifles and ammunition to rifle clubs organ- 
ized by civilians. Under this act ten citizens in any 
locality can organize themselves into a government 
rifle club and adopt by-laws approved by the Secre- 
tary of War. The club then affiliates with the Na- 
tional Rifle Association of America and there is 
issued by the War Department one new Krag rifle for 
every five members of the club and 120 rounds of 
ammunition to each member annually for use on the 
rifle range. The work of organizing the clubs, look- 
ing after them, issuing decorations and medals, and 
classifying their work, was put in the hands of the 
National Rifle Association of America, and this 
organization, which for forty-two years has been 
working to make rifle shooting a popular sport in 
this country, has suddenly sprung into prominence 
through its co-operation with the government by the 
organization of these clubs. Within the last year 
the association reports that it has completed the 
organization of over 400 clubs, not only in the United 
States proper, but in Porto Rico, Canal Zone, Alaska 
and Hawaii. Over 1,500,000 rounds of ammunition 
have been issued to these clubs during the year, and 
about 3,000 rifles. The possibilities of this move- 
ment are unlimited and depend only upon the secur- 
ing of range facilities where such clubs can carry on 
their work. With this object in view. Congress will 
be asked at this session to provide for a commission 
to investigate the entire subject of range construc- 
tion from a national defense standpoint, survey the 
entire country and recommend a permanent national 
policy of range construction and localities where such 
ranges should be constructed. In addition the Na- 
tional Rifle Association will ask for a national charter 
and an annual appropriation of $25,000 from Congress 
to assist it in carrying on the work as it should be 
done. Although the association has a perfect organ- 
ization, with secretaries and branches in every state, 
there is no way in which it can reimburse these sec- 
retaries for their traveling expenses and time, and 
it is hardly to be expected that these men, who are 
active and prominent in business, should devote their 
time and money to this work without reimburse- 
ment.— American Field. 

FIELD TRIALS FOR TACOMA. 



At a meeting of the Washington Field Trial Club 
at Tacoma, Wash., it was decided to hold the first 
annual trials of the club on February 21 and 22. The 
club has been endeavoring to secure the privilege of 
running its trials on certain grounds about twenty- 
five miles from Tacoma, where is located the best 
trials ground in the Northwest, but has been unable 
so far to complete the desired arrangements, although 
it is satisfied that all arrangements will be com- 
pleted for use in the fall of 1916, in which case the 
trials will be held about September 15. The grounds 
there will be about five by eight miles in extent, prac- 
tically a level field, with good footing and with quan- 
tities of birds of several varieties. All the trials will 
be run on mixed game birds. 

The club is running a Membership and open Derby 
and open All-Age stakes. No one barred in the open 
stakes. Entry fees, $3 to enter and $2 starting fees, 
sixty per cent of entry fees in each class to be 
divided as prize money. 

Entry blanks for the coming trials may be had from 
F. E. King, secretary, P. O. Box 63, Tacoma, Wash. 

The officers of the new club are: President, Elliott 
Kelly; vice-president, A. H. Nelson; secretary-treas- 
urer, F. E. King; board of trustees, J. A. Balmer. 
W. W. Kurtz. D. G. Macdonell, Al Weiseman, Elliott 
Kelly, A. H. Nelson and F. E. King. 



[Saturday, January 15, 1916. 



LOCAL DOGS FOR NEW YORK SHOW, 



Quite a few California kennels will be represented 
at the Westminster show which opens in New York 
City on February 20th. Walter Stettheimer of the 
Tallac Fox Terrier Kennels; John M.. Williams who 
had the imported airedale Crofton Chum, winner of 
100 ribbons in England, on exhibition at the exposi- 
tion: O. F. Vedder, Pacific Coast representative of 
the American Kennel Club, and John Bradshaw with 
Country Model, judged best dog at the exposition 
show, are among those who have declared their in- 
tentions of making the trip. Mrs. Anita Baldwin is 
also considering the possibility of taking back some 
bull dogs, airedales and Russian wolfhounds from 
her Anoakia Kennels in the southern part of the 
Stale. Mrs. Baldwin is importing six airedale ter- 
riers from England for breeding purposes. 

t t t 

In all probability the Golden Gate Kennel Club of 
San Francisco will stage its annual show in April. 
An invitation has been extended to Walter H. 
Reeves of London, England, to judge all breeds. Mr. 
Reeves is manager of the famous Victor Fox Terrier 
Kennels of Great Barrington, 111. There promises to 
be an extensive local kennel circuit this season to 
be made up of shows promoted by the Golden Gate, 
San Mateo, San Jose, Oakland and Marin clubs. 

* * t 

The Pacific Cocker Spaniel Club held a well attend- 
ed meeting on December 28, 1915, and elected the 
following officers for the coming year: W. H. Den- 
nis, president: F. N. Burns, vice-president; J. C. 
Rutten, secretary-treasurer; Miss L. Hering, trustee; 
Mrs. F. M. Scheik, trustee. The election for judges 
will take place at the January meeting. 

t t t 

H. M. Robertson of Pasadena, a well-known South- 
ern handler, will bring a large string of dogs for the 
Golden Gate show. 

t t t 

Champion Khartoum, a once famous bull dog, died 
this week at the home of his owner, Mrs. Agnes Fen- 
wick, 2376 Jackson street. Khartoum was bred by 
Mrs. Penfold Field of London. He was imported sev- 
eral years ago, and after defeating many famous 
champions at the Philadelphia show he was sold to 
Mrs. Hamilton of New York for $2000, then a record 
price for a bull dog. 

t t t 

Mrs. Anna Elliott, owner of the crack little Maltese 
terrier. Sir Francis Drake, intends to show him at 
all the coming local shows. Drake recently won the 
required number of points to entitle him to his cham- 
pionship. 

t t t 

Mayor Rolph has added to his Mission kennels a 
brace of English harriers and a foxhound. The 
Mayor intends to send them to the country to get 
them in condition so trat they will be in trim when 
the time comes to use them for hunting. 

t t t 

"Pat" Moran, manager of the Phillies, has bought 
an airedale puppy. The youngster will be called 
"Alex," in honor of the Quaker's star pitcher. Alex 
will be the mascot of the team next year. 

* t t 

Mr. Nat McConnell, Vancouver, B. C, reports a 
splendid litter of nine pups, four dogs, whelped Sep- 
tember 14th. They are sired by Mr. McConnell's 
crack dog. Bachelors Boy and out of Kilarney Pan- 
dora, the dam of Ch. Killarney Marion. 

■ o ■ 

JOHN X. DeWITT LAID TO REST. 



John X. DeWitt, for many years in charge of the 
rod and gun department on the Breeder and Sports- 
man, w-as laid to final rest on January 7, interment 
being at Mount Olivet Cemetery. The funeral serv- 
ices were held under the auspices of California Parlor 
No. 1, Native Sons of the Golden West, of which the 
deceased was a member. 

A large delegation, including many anglers and 
huntsmen, was iri attendance. Phil Bekeart spoke 
feelingly of his old departed friend. "Never in all 
my experience have I ever met a man with a kinder 
and sweeter nature than Jack DeWitt," he said. "Not 
once did I ever hear him speak an unkind word of 
a brother, and he was always ready to grasp a friend 
by the hand. 

"There are many in this gathering who held the 
friendship of Jack DeWitt dearly. I see some of his 
boon companions back in the eighties, when he was 
a member of the Olympic Club. Others met him by 
the stream and brook. There are many of us who 
will miss Jack DeWitt in the days to come." 

Turning to the casket with eyes dimmed by tears, 
Bekeart continued: "Jack, I wish with all my heart 
that you will find in the place where I know you are 
going a large, green meadow and that you will have 
your favirite rod in your hand, so that pleasure and 
comfort will be yours." 

It was a beautiful speech filled with deep feeling 
and expressed the sentiment of all of the late John 
X. DeWiti's many friends. 

o 

Secretary E. Reed Shaner of the Interstate Asso- 
ciation announces that the following committee has 
been named to allot handicaps to entrants in the 
coming Grand American Handicap: Jas. W. Bell, 
chairman, St. Louis, Mo.; Ray E. Loring, Marseilles, 
Ills.; Geo. K. Mackie, Lawrence, Kans.; Guy V. Der- 
ing, Columbus, Wis.; John H. Noel, Nashville, Tenn. 
o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL 

CONDUCTED BY FISHER HUNT 



Saturday, January 15, 1916.] 



THE BREEDER ANL 



SPORTSMAN 



9 



j Sportsmen's Row j 



\V. H. Price, President of the Golden Gate Gun 
Club, has been suffering with a severe cold for the 
past week or so but is setting better. Billy's place 
on Stevenson street off Second is the gathering point 
for the boys and they have a most genial host. Billy 
is one of the pioneers of the shooting brigade. 

It will be several days before Max Rosenbach will 
be sighting his trusty shotgun at a bird on the wing. 
While reading the paper the other night he had the 
misfortune to stick his finger in his eye and he has 
been laid up with a bandage over his lamp. Max 
says he is going to wear interference boots on his 
hands hereafter. 

* * * * 

A. J. Stevenson pulled a funny one at Alviso on 
Sunday. He became drowsy while in the blind and 
dropped off to sleep. It was only a few minutes 
before he opened his eyes and was surprised to find 
a whole flock of spoonbills around the decoys. His 
gun was in such an awkward position, however, that 
the birds got pretty well up before he could get a 
shot and he only landed one. Stevenson is going to 
take an alarm clock into the blind the next time he 
goes hunting. 

* * * * 

The blue-rock busters are looking forward to Dick 
Reed's early return from Portland, where he went on 
business. Dick has a flock of friends who are anx- 
ious to listen to many of his original stories. 

* * * * 

Hugh Poston has had Bill Price fit a new stock to 
his shotgun and expects to miss but few this coming 
season. He places his faith in the single barrel gun, 
not discarding it even for quail. Hugh is visiting 
San Joaquin valley and will be back next week. 

* * * * 

Theodore Kytka, the handwriting expert, is an 
ardent devotee of the rod and gun. He is a crack 
shot and understands wild birds thoroughly. Fact is, 
he conducts a miniature game farm in the back yard 
of his residence at Union and Broderick streets in 
this city. Some years ago Mr. Kytka secured per- 
mission from the Fish and Game Commission to 
raise wild ducks. He has mallard and teal running 
wild. Their wings are clipped and they have devel- 
oped into great pets. A pond is provided for the 
birds and they seem contented and happy in their 
home surrounded by civilization. 

* * * * 

Some thirty members of the Sutter Gun Club and 
their guests recently enjoyed a big turkey supper 
and on the following morning turned out and enjoyed 
good sport on the preserves in banging away at 
ducks and geese. Those who were in attendance 
included C. R. Boyd, E. M. Boyd, Charles Boyd, Jr., 
C. D. O'Banion, E. B. Starr, Frank Bremer, Law- 
rence Schillig. Phillip Chism, C. W. Rankin, Donald 
Wilkie, Mr. Summerville of Sacramento, Hobart 
Miller, E. S. Kimball, S. McLean, Glen Onstott, and 
John Onstott, Jr. 

H. A. Harms, A. A. Brown, W. H. Keaton, J. E. 
Robinson, and Frank Ely had the good fortune to 
get the limit of geese in the San Joaquin volley, all 
of which provided a grand "goose supper" for the 
Woodmen of the World lodge at Sacramento. 

* * * * 

One of the few shooting accidents of the season 
was reported on the banks of Butte Creek last week. 
W. B. Dobson was stooping over a trap when he was 
peppered with bird shot. Tony Mattiazzi, a sixteen- 
year-old lad, confessed to the authorities that he did 
the shooting. He explained that he heard a stir in 
the brush and let go a barrel, thinking it was a duck. 
An investigation proved that it was •..holly accidental 
and no action was taken when the lad's father guar- 
anteed to pay the expenses of Dobson, who was not 
seriously injured. 

* * * * 

Carl Tobiasson of Indian Flat had a thrilling ex- 
perience with a mountain lion while returning to 
his home on Christmas eve. He encountered the 
animal in his path and took a shot with his shotgun. 
The lion became enraged when some of the leaden 
pellets took effect in his side and made a charge. 
Tobiasson says he did not hesitate to make tracks 
for his house and broke some speed records in reach- 
ing safety. 

* * * * 

If you have a claim on the friendship of Al Drendcll 
get him to make you a dish of his celebrated "mys- 
tery stew." Homer Gambler and Mark Weyman, who 
went on a hunting trip with him last fall, had the 
pleasure of sampling it and they give it the seal of 
their O. K. The ingredients are so varied and kept 
so secret by Drendell that it has justly earned its 
name of "mystery." Drendell is an enthusiastic 
huntsman, angler and dog fancier and many years of 
experience in camps stand back of his famous stew. 

* * * * 

John Fisher, game expert of the Viah and Game 
Commission, has been standing many a good laugh 
this week. He received a quiet tip from a friend at 
Dixon to the effect that geese were to be found in 
abundance along the Sacramento river. Mr. Fisher 
is pretty handy with shotgun or rifle and forthwith 



made known to his friends that they could make 
arrangements for a goose dinner. While to make the 
story brief, said John Fisher went out Sunday in all 
the rain and wind and he returned burdened down 
with one (1) goose. Hence the laugh. 

o 

STEELHEAD ANGLING JUST ABOUT OVER. 



Devotees of that sport par-excellence, steelhead 
angling, have reached the conclusion that their opera- 
tions for the season are just about over. The heavy 
rain came along at a time when the fighting demon 
fish were arriving and the rivers have been placed 
in such a condition that the rod and reel activities 
are out of the question. 

The season opened on December 15th and lasts two 
months and anglers were enthused over the news 
that the bar was open on Russian River. Many 
were the parties planned to visit the favorite spot 
at Duncan's Mills before the rain came down. The 
anglers are usually afforded opportunities to make 
catches while the steelheads stay in the tide waters. 
With tlie rivers rising, however, the fish went right 
on through up-stream to the small streams that 
empty into the main body of water. 

The Paper Mill creek in Marin county, Sonoma 
creek, Salmon creek and the San Gregorio and I'es- 
cadero creeks in San Mateo, other favorite steelhead 
fishing waters, have been affected the same as the 
Russian river. 

The striped bass seekers were forced to places of 
shelter by the rain and wind. Fact is, the sport has 
not been as good along the San Antonio as many of 
the regulars had hoped for. 

The San Francisco Striped Bass Club is going to 
make merry this coming Thursday night. The an- 
nual dinner will be held at the St. Germain Restau- 
rant on Ellis street just off Market. President Alvin 
W. Thornton and James Lynch of the entertainment 
committee iiivite all members to be present and to 
bring their wives, sweethearts and friends. The club 
is arranging some merry entertainment to amuse the 
big gathering that is expected. 

o 

GREWELL BEST AT VERNON TRAPS. 



With several old timers on hand and several men 
prominent in trap shooting circles as visitors, the 
Vernon Gun Club staged its postponed clay pigeon 
shoot last Sunday morning and afternoon despite the 
chances of rain. 

The contest of fifty targets covered the W. H. 
Wilshire trophy, the final shoot for the blackbird 
watch fobs and the initial shoot foi' the four silver 
loving cups. 

Fred Grewell of William Hoegee company, shooting 
from the seventeen-yard range, successfully showed 
that he was the best shooter of the day, by copping 
a leg on the Wilshire trophy by breaking forty-six 
birds out of the half century thrown. 

Grewell makes the tenth shooter who has won a 
leg on this prize, which goes to show that the handi- 
caps carefully selected for each shooter are what 
they should be and again that the shooters who were 
in the "dub" class six months ago are coming to the 
front and are up with the former cracks, who used to 
annex every prize in sight shoot after shoot. 

R. L. Hall broke Ifil out of 175 in practicing. This 
was as good as the best. He has improved wonder- 
fully of late, and is now one of the 90 per cent class, 
shooting in class A. 

Class shooting covered the loving cups and watch 
fobs competition. Hall was victor in class A with a 
45x50 score. In class B Doc Fitzgerald and Forrest 
of the Fillmore Gun Club tied with 44x50 scores. 
Grewell copped a leg on a cufi in class C with his 
score of 46x50, and C. E. Groat, president of the Ver- 
non Gun Club, won in class 11 with 46x50. The four 
best scores made during the last three months on 
the watch fobs will be looked over and announced 
in a few days by the club management. 

Barham of Arizona, a crack shot of the Cactus 
state, cam(> out with "Pop" Haight of the Du Pont 
Powder Company. Ilaight pinged a number of tar- 
gets al practice shooting and broke 109 out of 125. 

Ed Mitchell of Selby Load fame also journeyed out 
to the club on Sunday, it being his first trip. He 
came out in his brand new gasoline buss and ex- 
plained how his car had it on Henry Ford's silent 
"four." At the traps he broke 71 out of 75. 

The scores are as follows: 

Wilshire trophy and loving cup competition of 50 
birds — 



Mat<'h. Practice. 



.Vnmo — 


Hdcp. 


Th. 


Rr. 


Th. 


Br. 


U. L. Hall 


, , , 18 


r,i) 


45 


175 


161 




. . , 16 




3» 


ion 




Mcnfl.ville 


. . , 17 


hO 


39 


50 


38 




in 




44 


175 


164 




17 


,10 


44 








18 


r,ti 


40 


100 


•li 


T. P. Smith 


17 


r,() 


41 


50 


40 




. . , 16 


r>(t 


.39 






A. W. Hrunor 


16 




45 


.in 


43 




16 


HI) 


41 


75 


63 




.... 18 


50 


44 


125 


114 




.... 16 




40 


50 


34 




19 


.50 


46 


125 


115 




18 


.lo 


41 


75 


65 


C. R. Groat 


. . . 16 


an 


45 


75 


64 




16 


r,tt 


43 


50 


44 




. . . , 18 


r,ii 


44 


50 


44 


Diirdoff 


. , . , 17 


r,ii 


36 


50 


40 


I'Yi'd ' Irowell 


.... 17 


r,i) 


46 


50 


49 




. . . 16 


.10 


30 


50 


37 


M. U Keer 


16 


50 


39 


25 


20 


Kd Mitchell 


. . . 16 






75 


71 






50 


.3!) 


25 


23 




, . 16 






25 


16 




. . . . 16 






25 


19 




18 


50 


41 


125 


109 



COURSING RESTRICTED TO MEMBERS. 



At a meeting of the Capital City Coursing Club, 
held Monday afternoon at Sacramento, it was decided 
that only members will be permitted to enter dogs at 
future m(>ets. The action was taken for the purpose 
of promoting ntembership as well as to luake it easier 
to prop(>rly handle the meets. The initiation fee will 
be $1 and tlit> nu)ntlily dues will be 25 cents. 

R. K. Malcolm and J. H. Rossiter of San Francisco 
offered .$50 each to the club to be included in the 
stake offered at the next meet, wliich will be held 
some time early in February, th(> date to be an- 
nounced later. 

John Grace, J. H. Rossiter and R. K. Malcolm were 
made honorary members of th(> club. Such member- 
ship will in future be a prize. 

o 

ANGLERS FIGHT FOR McCLOUD RIVER. 



Anglers of the state, counties whose fishing streams 
are among their important resources and various 
sportsmen of California are watching with much in- 
terest the cond(<nination proceedings instituted by 
the county sui)ervisors of Shasta against the Hearst- 
Wheeler interests, who control nine miles of the river 
which was slocked witli fisli by tlu^ state, and who 
now are preventing citizens from fishing. So keen 
is this contest that anglers of the state are prepar- 
ing to rally to the fight, $1000 already having been 
raised in Siskiyou county to aid in the legal battle. 

George Neale of the Fish and Game Commission 
asserted that he hoped the people of California were 
alive to the threat to tlieir interests which is found 
in the Wheeler-Hearst action in setting up a baro- 
netcy on this river. Similar action, if permitted on 
the part of others, would mean that seventy persons 
could control all the streams of Shasta county and 
no Californian other than theiuselves would be per- 
mitted on the premises. 

Involved in the legal fight is the Rutherford law 
passed at the last legislature purposely to regulate 
this very evil. This law, which Governor Johnson 
signed despite hundreds of protests from the big 
interests of the state, provides that land along a 
stream may be condenmed for a highway, thus per- 
mitting fishermen to follow that stream and fish. 

lender this act the supervisors of Shasta county 
instituted condemnation proceedings along the nine 
miles of the McCloud river where the Wheeler- 
Hearst holding are situated and now the legal forces 
are squaring away for the battle. 

Questioned on the matter recently F. W. Newbert 
of the fish and game commission said: "Not only 
have the Hearts prevented the people of the state 
who paid, by direct taxation, for the stocking of the 
stream, from ashing in front of their property, but 
the people are unable to reach other parts of the 
river so controlled because they are not permitted 
to pass the Hearst estate. An armed guard warns 
every one away. 

"What these interests think of the poor people is 
shown by the establishment of the Hearst preserve 
on the McCloud river, and the fight to prevent the 
people of California from catching the fish they 
themselves have paid for." 

It is understood that the big estate is controlled 
by Charles S. ^\ heeler, attorney for Mrs. Hearst. — 
Sacramento Union. Jan. 10. 

o — 

WINNERS OF DuPONT LONG RUN CONTESTS. 



The DuPont Powder Company makes announce- 
ment of the trapshooters who shot well enough dur- 
in;; the year to win the DuPont Long Run Trophy 
Watches. They are: 

H. B. Shoop. Ilarrisburg. Pa.: W. S. Rehm, Esterly, 
Pa.; J. W. Hon. St. Louis, Mo.: F. G. Bills (p). Chi- 
cago, 111.: J. S. Frink, Worthington, Minn.: L. S. Ger- 
man (p), Aberdeen. Md.: Fred Gilbert (p). Spirit 
Lake, Iowa: J. M. Hawkins (p). Forest Park, Md. 
(2): Woolfolk Henderson. Lexington. Ky.: Chas. 
Hummel, La Porte City, Iowa: S. A. Huntley, Chi- 
cago, 111.: A. Killain (p), St. Louis, Mo. (2): C. N. 
Newcomb, Philadeli)hia, Pa.: Jno. H. Noel, Nash- 
ville, Tenn.i A. B. Richard.son, Dover, Del.; C. G. 
Spencer (p), St. Louis, Mo.: J. R. Taylor (p), New- 
ark, Ohio; W. H. Tolen, Fort Dodge, Iowa: F. M. 
Troch, Vancouver, Wash.; J. P. White, Walertown, 
S. Dak.: F. S. Wright, Buffalo, N. Y.; C. A. Young, 
Springfi(>ld. Ohio. 

The letter "p" indicates the professionals. In 
this connection it will be noted that Arthur Killam 
and J. M. Hawkins have both won two watches. The 
rules governing the award of thes(> watches provide 
that an amateur make fifteen runs of 50 or over and 
a professional twenty-five runs of 50 or over. Rims 
to count against the watches must be made with 
DuPont. Hallisliite, Schultze or Empire powder and 
at tournamcnis rcgisleroel willi the Interstate Asso- 
ciation. This Long Run Trophy Plan is continuous 
through 1916 or the present year, and shooters who 
have not made the runs necessary to win a watch 
may complete their rtms in 1916. The competition 
is continuous through 1916 in that shooters may win 
any number of watches or merchandise to the value 
of the watch and that the watch may be either a 
lady's or gentleman's design. 

o 

The five thous.nnd acre farm of Col. Frank O. Low- 
den of Oregon, III., has been leased for a period of 
five years to the slate of Illinois as a game preserve. 
f;oI. Lowden will live on the farm and till the soil, 
as formerly, but no hunting will be allowed on the 
premises. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 15, 1916. 



REGISTERED TOURNAMENT AVERAGES OF THE 
INTERSTAE ASSOCIATION FOR 1915. 



Pittsburgh, Pa., January 1, 1916. 
To the Breeder and Sportsman: 

F'oUowing herewith is the official Interstate Asso- 
ciation list of amateur and professional shooting aver- 
ages for 1915, with nanu'S of contestants, total num- 
ber of targets .shot at in Registered Tournaments, 
total number of targets scored, and percentages. 

The averages for single targets for both amateurs 

and professionals are based on a minimum of 2,000 
targets, as per The Interstate Association ruling to 
that effect. 

The averages for double targets are computed on 
The Association Tournaments only, and they are 

based on taking part in two tournaments as a mini- 
mum, as per The Interstate Association ruling to that 
effect. 

THE INTERSTATE ASSOCIATION, 

E. REED SHANER, Secretary. 

AVERAGES FOR SINGLE TARGETS. 
Amateurs. 

Name and Addrcs.>i Sh. at Bke. Pet. 

Hindenson. Woolfolk, I^fxiiiKton, Ky... 28no 2731 .975;! 

Huntley, K. A., Omaha. Neb 3900 377.5 .9679 

Wright, Frank S., nuffalo, N. Y 3455 3333 .9646 

Ridley, W in., What Cheer. la 231)0 2215 .9630 

Holland, D. J.. .SprinKlield. Mo ^000 1923 .9615 

Jahn, Jno. R., Davenport, la 2100 2019 .9614 

liichard.son, A. 15., Dover, Del 3480 3329 .9566 

llehm, Walter .S., K.sterly, Pa 4285 4098 .9563 

Craper, F. A., Cubter I'ark, Ills 3480 3328 .9563 

Foord. Wm. M., Wilmington, Del 2805 2681) .9554 

.Newcomb, Cha.s. M., Philadelphia, Pa. 4600 5385 .9532 

Heil, Allen, Allentown, Pa 2750 2618 .9520 

White, J. Potter. Watertown, S. Dak.. 3440 3274 .9517 

Hummel, Cha.s., La Porte City, la 3590 3415 .9512 

Ford. O. N.. San Jose, Cal 2830 2690 .9505 

Painter. Geo. B., Pittsburgh, Pa 2050 1958 .9502 

.N'oel, John H.. Nashville, Tenn 2950 2797 .9481 

Tolen, W. H., Ft. Dodge, la 3390 3209 .9466 

Bell, Jas. W., .St. Loui.s. Mo 3450 3256 .9437 

Coburn, C. D., Mechanicsburg, 3625 3419 .9431 

Apperson, Edgar L., Kokomo. Ind 2355 2219 .9422 

Cochrane, W. H.. Hristol. Tenn 2280 2148 .9421 

Teats, Brian, Northumberland, Pa 2710 2553 .9420 

Oolhers. E. K.. Bloomington, Ills 2900 2729 .9410 

Troeh, F. M., Vancouver, Wash 2050 1975 .9634 

Knox, J. N., Convoy, Ohio 2030 1908 .9399 

Fi.sh, Ceo. N., Lyndonville, N. Y 2455 2307 .9397 

Bellinger, H. N., Memphis, Tenn 2800 2628 .9385 

Edmonson, C. A.. Clayton, Ind 2305 2163 .9383 

French, A. J., Watertown, S. Dak 2350 2204 .9379 

Frink. John S., Worthington, Minn 3920 3668 .9357 

Henlinc, C. D.. Bradford, Pa 2225 2081 .9352 

Hall. G. T., L,oami, Ills 2000 1868 .9340 

C^hamberlain, A. L,.. New Haven, Conn. 2070 1933 .9338 

Campbell. A. H., Memphis. Tenn 2050 1914 .9336 

Billmeyer. Frank, Cumberland, Md. . . . 2500 2334 .9336 

Prior. Toney, San Francisco, Cal 2430 2267 .9329 

Shoop. Harry B.. Harrisburg. Pa 4345 4052 .9325 

Young. Jesse S.. Chicago, Ills 2780 2591 .9320 

(^ochran, Geo.. Rodfleld, Pa 2200 2048 .9309 

Barrett. J. M., Atlanta, Ga 2100 1954 .9304 

Koch. F. C. I'hillipsburg. 2500 2326 .9304 

Martin, John G., Harri.sburg, Pa 5495 5111 .9301 

Morgan, R. D., Washington, D. C 3190 2966 .9297 

Severn. Wm. B.. Philadelphia. Pa 2005 1863 .9291 

Varner. E. W.. Adams, Neb 2690 2497 .9282 

Ogilvie. Harry. Lindsay, Cal 2750 2552 .9280 

Kautzky. Joe. Ft. Dodge. Iowa 2840 2633 .9271 

Remy, B. P.. Indianapolis, Ind 3030 2809 .9270 

Austin. J. T.. Monroe, La 3000 2781 .9270 

Buckles, A. C. Lake Fork. Ills 2950 2734 .9267 

Tomlin, Fred S.. Glassboro, N. J 2060 1909 .9266 

Adams, E. H., Reading, Pa 2200 2037 .0259 

Chipley, John I., Greenwood, S. C 3450 3190 .9246 

Burger. Paul R., Catawissa, Pa 2210 2043 .9244 

McKelvey, C. E., .Seattle. Wash 2400 2218 .9241 

Connor, A. C. Springneld, Ills 4200 3881 .9240 

Nash. Chas. H., San Jose, Cal 2225 2052 .9222 

Warren. J. K., Birmingham, Ala 2350 2167 .9221 

Gayle, Roy C, Lincoln, Ills 2000 1844 .0220 

Waggoner, C. L.. Diller, Neb 2100 1936 .9219 

Ivins, A. L., Red B.nnk, N. J 2015 1855 .9206 

Rains. R. C. West Frankfort. Ills 2000 1841 .9205 

Stevens. C. T.. Zanesville, Ohio 2050 1886 .9200 

Corfleld. W. E.. Utica. N. Y 2520 3218 .9198 

Stewart. M. E., W'est Fairview. Pa.... 2200 2023 .9195 

Dodds. J. F.. San Diego. Cal 3795 3489 .9193 

Roseberry. F. U., Baltimore, Md 2655 2439 .9186 

Putnam. S. W., Fitchburg, Mass 2160 1984 .9185 

Nelson, Carl, F., Rawlins. Wyo 2150 1974 .9181 

Calhoun. J. F.. McKeesport. Pa 2150 1969 .9158 

Mellon. Frank. Pittsburgh, Pa 2150 1968 .9153 

Hinshaw. E. C. Spirit Lake, la 3290 3007 .9139 

Hood, H. C., Pittsburg, Kans 2150 1965 .9139 

Glanville, Dean, Mason City, Iowa 2100 1918 .9133 

Riniernian, R. W.. Burton View, Ills... 2500 2283 .9132 

Clark. Jr.. Ja.v, Worcester. Mass 2530 2308 .9122 

Blunt, J. A., CJreensboro, Ala 2350 2143 .9119 

Vanderhoof, W. W., Watkins, N. Y. . . 2105 1919 !9116 

Sidebotham, Frank. Philadelphia. Pa.. 3300 3008 .9115 

Koyen. A.. Fremont, Neb 3390 3090 .9115 

.Speer. John S.. St. Marys. Pa 2175 1982 .9112 

Bender. F. S., Lansdale, Pa 2275 2072 9107 

Clinger, Geo. W., Milton, Pa 2095 1908 9107 

Graham. S. C. S.. Baltimore, Md 2070 1885 .9106 

Godcharles, Fred'k Milton, Pa 2270 2062 .9083 

Hickman, M. D., Durant. Okia 2300 2089 !9082 

Plum. Fred. Atlantic City. N. J 4115 3729 .9061 

Riehl, A. A.. Tacoma. Wash 2000 1809 .9045 

Robison. L. J.. Peoria. Ills 3000 2713 .9043 

M'ilkes, Thos., San Franci.sco, Cal 2200 1989 .9049 

Dorton. H. C, Fonda, Iowa 2130 1920 .9014 

Dearing. Geo. L. Shelbyville, Ills 2450 2204 .8995 

Shauver, Fred, Nettleton, Ark 2350 2114 .8995 

Eyre. Harry. Philadelphia. Pa 2100 1887 8985 

Bartlett, E. L.. Baltimore, Md 2205 1979 8975 

Yearous. A. L., Eagle Grove. la 3450 3090 .8956 

Binns. O. H.. Logansport. Ind 2350 2100 .8936 

Oliver. V., Philadelphia. Pa 3465 3094 .8929 

Mackie. fleo. K., Lawrence, Kans 3680 3283 .8921 

Muncy. .V.. Iowa City, la 2850 2536 .8898 

Northey. Harry (i., Waterloo. Iowa... 2050 1822 .8887 

Wadsworth. 3rd, D.. Auburn. N. Y 2480 2199 8866 

Bbberts, John, Buffalo. N. Y 3455 3061 .8859 

Boodbar. J. B., Memphis, Tenn 2360 2089 .8851 

liampright, C, E., Algona, la 2590 2284 .8818 

Lyman, C. W.. Varina, la 2640 2328 .8818 

Konvalinka, Joe. Mason Citv. la 2350 2069 8840 

Larsen, L. C, Kan.sas City, Mo 2450 2155 .8795 

Corson, L. L.. Waterloo, la 2550 2237 .8772 

Foster, Sam S.. Mason City. la 3050 2668 !8747 

Den. J. C, .North Platte. Neb 2760 2414 .8746 

Schilling, Mrs. Ada, San Jose, Cal 2430 2116 .8707 

Fisher, J. F., Titonka, la 2590 2255 .8706 

Lawrence, Dr. E. P., Lincoln, Ills 2250 1956 .8693 

Lagerquist. C. R., Manchester, N. H. . 2150 1866 .8679 

Ford. E. C. Philadelphia. Pa 2550 2204 .8643 

Burnham, Fred'k. Martinez, Cal 2080 1783 .8572 

Fontaine, J. B., Philadelphia, Pa 2350 2008 .8544 



Where, O Where Are Northern Ducks? 



Where, O, where are those flights of northern 
birds that have been awaited by local hunters ever 
since the first of December? Each week they have 
confidently been expected but up to dale but com- 
paratively few have put in an appearance. Experts — 
men who have followed hunting conditions and tra- 
tlitions year after year — are at a loss to understand 
tfie absence of the northern visitors. 

One of the theories advanced is that the cold 
season set in in the north at a late date this winter 
and that the birds may be along later on. Another 
is that the fights started arriving at the time our 
terrific storm of a couple of weeks ago was raging 
and the bright fowls set a course inland and in a 
southerly direction. They may have gone to the 
Imperial valley. Certainly, few stayed in these parts 
and the local shotgunners have depended on local 
ducks for their sport. 

It is fortunate that there were many local birds In 
evidence, otherwise the season would have been very 
disastrous. At the San Francisco office of the Fish 
and Game Commission the information is given out 
that the ducks about the bay shores bred in larger 
numbers last season than in years past. This is 
attributed to the fact that the late shooting in the 
spring was prohibited earlier than usual. The bom- 
barding stopped on the last day of January and the 
birds were enabled to nest here with the pleasing 
results that have been set forth. 

Shooting last Sunday was practically at a stand- 
still on the bay points. M. S. Clark, a game deputy, 
made an inspection in a launch of the northern points 
of the bay on Sunday and found little or no game 
bagged. On Wednesday and Thursday he was on 
the south bay and found the waters just as barren 
of birds. Another evidence of the lack of birds is 
contained in the shipping reports turned in to the 
Fish and (lame Commission. There were but seven 
limits shipped in from the different clubs and points 
about the bay, while when the season is in full blast 
there are scores of limits. 

Phil Bekeart and Charley Breidenstein, a couple of 
well posted authorities on hunting, take a pessimistic 
view of the duck hunting season. "There will be no 
more duck hunting on the bay or salt w'ater marshes 
for the rest of the season," says Bekeart. "When 
the storm came along the ducks scattered inland to 



feed at the new ponds and puddles that have been 
created. The northern birds have failed to put in an 
appearance for some unaccounted reason and it looks 
as it the only shooting that can be had is up in the 
rice field country up the state." 

Breidenstein declares that it looks like the rod and 
gun fraternity will have to take a rest until May first, 
when the season opens for trout angling. 

The recent turnout hasn't been very large. Sorne 
of the boys who went inland had some good sport last 
Sunday but it was raining close to home. Down in 
the Alviso marshes good bags were in evidence. 
A. J. Stevenson, Adolph Sutro and C. W. Kirke shot 
at the bridges and brought down spoonbills and some 
canvasbacks. The Eureka Gun Club had a good 
shoot and Frank Graves was in a party at the Auto 
Gun Club that got limits. Quite a few of the hunters 
got on the train at the draw-bridges and proudly 
displayed big bags. 

From Los Banos it is reported that there is a bit 
too much water at present for high class results. 

At Arton on Sunday Charles H. Kewell found con- 
ditions good, with duck weather and plenty of birds. 
Tony Korbel and John Connolly made the party to 
get limits. 

A. Hebten, tieorge Dreuiki and Fred W. Kewell 
were out and between them they gathered in 62 birds, 
which was not a bad day's sport. 

Ed Bosqui and John Coleman w-orked along the 
Alameda shore and had a fair shoot. Snow and ice 
was still on the ground near Colusa but at that 
birds were flying. 

Several law breakers have been taken into the 
toils in this section of the state the past week. Mike 
Egan was gathered in at Burlingame by Deputy 
Commissioners Burke and Leahy and fined $10 for 
killing robins. John Delacaza was arrested in the 
same locality and fined $25 for hunting without a 
license. Both men appeared before Judge Lamb. 

Among others scooped into the net was Carlo 
Sorenzo, head waiter at a well known San Francisco 
restaurant. He was arrested in South San Mateo 
and fined $35 by Judge Davis, whow is rapidly becom- 
ing a terror for violators of the game laws. Sorenzo 
is an old offender. Last year he was arrested on a 
similar charge and fined $25. This time he was 
warned that if convicted he will be sent to jail. 



Willey. P. H.. Dansville. N. Y 3175 3171 

Melrath, E. B., Philadelphia. Pa 3500 2966 

Wilson, J. W., McKeesport, Pa 2025 1712 

Fell, Robt. G., Philadelphia, Pa 2075 1752 

Tuckett, Geo. J., Bay Side, L. 1.. N. Y. 2030 1705 

Fouts, J. E.. Fonda. la 2790 2343 

Castle. K. H,. Charles City. Iowa 3540 2970 

Remy. Frank, Anderson, Ind 2355 1968 

Penrod, J. E., Pitcairn, Pa 2000 1663 

Schuyler, W. H., Kittanning, Pa 2000 1660 

Derrich, Geo. W., West Haven, Conn... 2080 1718 

Bitterling, J. C, Allentown, Pa 2375 1926 

Amerman. R. D., Scranton, Pa 2050 1607 

Remy, Mrs. B. 1'., Indianapolis, Ind 2630 2035 

McCIarren, Wm., Ebensburg, Pa 2050 1544 

Remy, Mrs. Frank, Anderson, Ind 2155 1601 

Professionals. 

Name and Address Sh. at Bke. 

Spencer, Chas. G., St. Louis, Mo 5620 5480 

German, Lester S., Aberdeen, Md 4550 4433 

Reid. L. H.. Seattle. Wash 2550 2482 

Young, C. A.. Springfield. Ohio 3415 3319 

Killam, Art, St. Louis, Mo 5520 5364 

Gihbs, H. D., Union City, Tenn 3000 2898 

Clark. Homer. Alton, Ills 3880 3743 

Cro.sby. W. R., O'Farron. Ills 4050 3906 

Tavlor, John R.. Newark. Ohio 3755 3620 

Lewis, Bart, Auburn. Ills 2625 2528 

O'Brien. Ed.. Florence. Kans 4300 4131 

Storr. E. H.. Richmond, Va 2375 2281 

Hawkins. J. M., Baltimore, Md 7265 6943 

Graham, J. H.. Ingleside, Ills 6720 6419 

Krcger. Geo., Redfield, S. Dak 2040 1947 

Bill.s, F. G., Chicago, Ills 3730 3558 

Hirschy, H. C. Minneapolis, Minn 2825 2690 

Ammann, A. H., Peotone. Ills 4150 3950 

Goodrich. C. E., Atlanta, Ga 3900 3710 

Poston, H. E., San Francisco, Cal 5480 5209 

Somers. A. A.. Delta, P'la 2495 2368 

Huff, Walter, Macon, Ga 4900 4650 

Hinkle, J. R., Oklahoma City, Okla. . . 4975 4721 

Gilbert, Fred. Spirit Lake, la 6840 6490 

Wade. L. I.. Dallas. Texas 2695 2557 

Maxwell. Geo. W.. Hastings, Neb 5240 4964 

Marshall, T. A., Chicago, Ills 2770 2622 

Barre, J. W.. Louisiana, Mo 2250 2129 

Glover, Sim, Rochester. N. Y 2805 2653 

Reed, R. C, San Francisco, Cal 2430 2295 

Morgan, E. J., .Salt Lake City, Utah.. 4010 3782 

Kirkwood. H. C, La Grange, Ills 2275 2143 

Sked. O. S.. Wilkes-Barre. Pa 2350 2213 

Chapin. G. H.. Brookfield. Mass 3320 3125 

Kennicott, Harrison, St. Louis, Mo. . . . 4770 4490 

Worthington. H. L., Baltimore, Md 2880 2710 

Guptill. R. D.. Watertown. S. Dak 2150 2023 

Holohan. P. J.. Portland. Ore 3250 3056 

Dickey. J. E., Minneapolis. Minn 3725 3501 

Daniel. E. M., Lynchburg, Va 3860 3626 

Head, J. L.. Moberlv. Mo 2620 2461 

Cimiberlnnd. L. W., Columbus. Ohio 2650 2485 

Welles. H. S., New York. N. Y 5210 4877 

Banks, Edw.. Wilmington. Del 3950 3692 

Standard. W. D.. Chicago. Ills 5030 4701 

Donnelly, H. J., Oklahoma Citv. Okla.. 4250 3969 

Eastman, F. K.. Indianapolis, Ind 4080 3806 

Holcham. Guy E.. Los Angeles. Cal 2675 2495 

Schwartz. Ben. Houston. Texas 4275 3982 

Cadwallader, H. W.. Decatur. Ills 5350 4967 

Fox. T. H.. Lynchburg. Va 5050 4678 

Le Compte. C. O.. Ashville. N. C 3600 3331 

Gross, D. D., Kan.sas City, Mo 4200 3886 

Apgar. Neaf. New York, N. Y 6195 5731 

Darton. W. B.. Portland. Maine 5735 5300 

Higgins, W. D.. Minneapolis. Minn 3200 2953 

Stevens, H. H., Lavalette, N. J 4555 4199 

Barber, R. R., Minneapolis, Minn 3875 3567 

Willis, L. D.. Wilmington, Del 2300 2114 

Slear, E. Fred, Collingwood. N. J 2610 2398 

Barr. J. M.. Indianapolis, Ind 2400 2203 

Hardy, J. H., Denver, Colo 2200 2014 



.8536 
.8474 
.8454 
.8443 
.8399 
.8397 
.8389 
.8356 
.8315 
.8300 
.8259 
.8109 
.7839 
.7737 
.7.531 
.7429 



Pet. 
.9750 
.9742 
.9733 
.9718 
.9717 
.9660 
.9647 
.9644 
.9640 
.9630 
.9606 
.9604 
.9556 
.9552 
.9544 
.9538 
.9522 
.9518 
.9513 
.9505 
.9490 
.9489 
.9489 
.9488 
.9487 
.9473 
.9465 
.9462 
.9458 
.9444 
.9431 
.9419 
.9417 
.9413 
.9412 
.9409 
.9409 
.9403 
.9398 
.9393 
.9393 
.9377 
.9361 
.9346 
.9345 
.9338 
.9328 
.9327 
.9314 
.9284 
.9263 
.9253 
.92.52 
.9251 
.9241 
.9228 
.9218 
.9205 
.9191 
.9187 
.9179 
.9154 



Bovee. D. W.. Kansas City, Mo 3450 3154 

Joslvn, W. A., Wilmington, Del 2565 2338 

Fanning, J. S., New York, N. Y 4960 4518 

Hill. W. G., Portland, Maine 3780 3431 

Knight, Chas. H., San Franci.sco, Cal.. 2845 2580 

Chamberlain. W. R., Columbus, Ohio.. 2500 2264 

Willett, W. F., San Francisco, Cal 2000 1808 

Ford, G. H., Chicago, Ills 4280 3868 

Carter. Geo. L.. Lincoln. Neb 3640 3270 

Morris. E. B.. Portland. Ore 2050 1841 

Kirby. H. M., Kan.«as City. Mo 2050 1839 

Jones. W. S.. I'ittsburgh. Pa 5790 5177 

H:inimond. W. M.. Wilmington. Del 6990 6242 

Hymer, C. W., Minneapolis, Minn 3725 3325 

Bowman, Wm. M., Denver, Col 3500 3124 

Batchelor. J. W.. Kansas City. Co 3000 2665 

Dickey. O. R., Boston. Mass 5910 5220 

White, ^V■. P., Pittsburgh, Pa 2600 2292 

Lincoln, U, F.. Indianapolis, Ind 2405 2104 

Scholl, S. S., I'ittsburgh, Pa 2000 1748 

Sibley, A. E., Boston. Mass 2610 2267 

Lewis, Jas. K., Little Rock, Ark 2150 1859 

Haight, C. A., San Francisco, Cal 2095 1800 

.Squier, L. J., Pittsburgh. Pa 2250 1919 

Young. H. E.. Sheridan. Pa 2050 1734 

Holoday. C. J.. Indianapolis. Ind 2060 1739 

Pratt. J. F.. Philadelphia. Pa 3300 2782 

Simmons. K, R., Minneapolis. Minn.... 3075 2576 

Keller, H. A.. New York. N. Y 3370 2807 

(Jarland. J. C, Pittsburgh, Pa 2050 1692 

Flannigan, Dave, Minneapolis, Minn.... 4030 3308 

Lewis, L. R., Atglen. Pa 35.50 2898 

Dorenuis, T. E., Wilmington. Del 2750 2207 

Stanton. L. A.. Denver. Col 2030 1608 

Winans, H. E., Belleville, Ills 2985 2329 

Whitney. Fred C. Des Moines, la 6100 4652 

AVERAGES FOR DOUBLE TARGETS. 
Am.iteurs. 

Name and Address Sh. at Bke. 

Bering. Guy V., Columbus, Wis 150 135 

Huntley, S. A., Omaha. Neb 150 130 

Itenderson, Woolfolk, Ijexingttm, Ky. . 150 126 

Noel, John H.. Nashville, Tenn 150 118 

Ball, G. W.. Bridgeport, Ills 150 114 

Connor. A. C. Springlield. Ills 150 112 

Goodbar. J. B.. Memphis. Tenn 150 102 

Raup, W. J., I'ortage. Wis 150 97 

Professionals. 

Spencer, Chas. G., St. Louis, Mo 100 82 

Doremus. T. E., Wilmington. Del 100 65 

O 

CONVICTED BY A DOG. 



.9142 
.9115 
.9109 
.9076 
.9068 
.9056 
.9040 
.9035 
.8983 
.8980 
.8970 
.8941 
.8929 
.8926 
.8925 
.8883 
.8832 
.8815 
.8748 
.8740 
.8685 
.8646 
.8591 
.8528 
.8458 
.8441 
.8430 
.8377 
.8329 
.8253 
.8208 
.8163 
.8025 
.7921 
.7802 
.7626 



Pet. 
.9000 
.8666 
.8400 
.7866 
.7600 
.7466 
.6800 
.6466 

.8200 
.6500 



An interesting story came to our desk last month, 
says an exchange, telling of a Pittsburgh judge who 
found a defendant guilty largely on the testimony of 
a dog. So many newspaper articles about animals 
are without foundation in fact tliat we wrote to the 
judge himself to learn tlie truth of the clipping. The 
story was that a little girl, Florence Boening, w'as 
attacked by a peddler, one John Madie. She was 
alone in the house. A pet collie dog attacked the 
assailant and so allowed the child to escape and seek 
refuge at a neighbor's. The man was afterwards 
arrested and brought into court. As the child was 
the only human witness against him the dog was sum- 
moned into court. The dog immediately sprang at 
Madie and was with great difficulty prevented from 
doing him serious injurj'. The judge decided that the 
corroborative evidence of the dog left no doubt of 
the man's guilt. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Saturday, January 15, 1916.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



come infected. The hop is particularly liable to this 
disease because of its rooting habits. The egg may 
get into human food, and persons who allow dogs to 
lick their hands and face also run the risk of getting 
the eggs of the tapeworm in their systems. 

Prevention on the farm consists in so restraining 
the dog that ho can not get at carrion or raw viscera. 
Viscera should be boiled before being fed to dogs and 
should never be thrown on the fields. If not cook(>d 
and fed. viscera and carcasses should be burned, 
buried with lime, or so disposed of as not to be acce.=- 
sible to dogs. Proper feeding of the dog is essential, 
and the owner who does not feed a dog properly 
has no right to keep one. 

The parasite which causes gid in sheep somewhat 
resembles the ii>datid worm. A dog allowed to eat 
the brain of a giddy sheep may swallow this parasite 
and later distribute the eggs of the resulting tape- 
worm over the pasture. Sheep while grazing swal- 
low the eggs with the grass which they eat. In the 
case of sheep dogs it is important to administer 
vermifuges often enough to keep them free of these 
worms. In the case of sheep measles, the bladder 
worm in the meat, typical of this disease, is swal 
lowed by the dog and again the tapeworm eggs are 
passed by the dog to grass or water, and thy are 
eaten by the sheep. 

Of the external parasites which dogs may carry to 
animals, fleas and the various kinds of ticks arc both 
troublesome and dangerous. The remedy is clear. 
The owner must keep his dog clean, not merely for 
the comfort and happiness of the dog, but to prevent 
it from becoming a carrier of disagreeable and dan- 
gerous vennin. 

These reasonal le measures, important to the s'ock 
on the farm, have a direct connection with the health 
ol the family. Where ringworm or other sKIn dis- 
eases break out among the children, or the v.-orm 
p-uasiies develop, it is well to determine whether 
a dirty or uncared-for dog may not be carrying in- 
fection on his skin or hair, or be conveying; iisease 
Ironi carrion directly to the food and p.^r.^ons of his 
friend.^ Even if no one is infected wit)i disease, the 
f0]!y of allowing a dog to remain dirty nnd ha\"' the 
freedom of a home where personal cleanlines.s and 
hygiene are respected is apparent. 



NOTES GATHERED HERE AND THERE. 



Philip Sousa, the famous bandmaster, is also an 
enthusiastic sportsman and trapshooter, and when 
his official duties permit he spends much time with 
his gun in the field and at the trap, where he finds 
much mental relaxation and also much healthful 
recreation. Mr. Sousa owns a 2,000-acre game pre- 
serve in North Carolina, and on this he spends a 
great deal of time during the open shooting season. 
"When out with my gun," says Mr. Sousa, "I com- 
pletely relax, mentally and physically. There is 
always sufficient excitement and anticipation con- 
nected with field shooting to cause me to forget all 
business cares and enjoy life, and then the study of 
game and its habits is most interesting." 



The recent heavy snowstorm — one of the worst 
in years — in New York, New Jersey and other 
Eastern states, has, it is feared, killed by strvation 
many game birds as well as deer and other game. 
The snow fell to such a depth in many localities that 
it was days before the farmers could make the roads 
passable. In some instances the farmers could only 
get out to feed their stock by digging a passageway 
through the heavy drifts. 



Berks County, Pennsylvania, had 7,660 licensed 
hunters this year, and it is estimated that between 
38,000 and 40,000 rabbits were killed in that county 
this season during the month of November, many 
gunners shooting the bag limit of ten rabbits in one 
day. There was no snowfall in that section of the 
country in November, or the number would probably 
have been larger. Most of the hunting was done in 
the cornfields, which seemed to be a favorite rendez- 
vous for the bunnies. Most of the hunters think that 
if the open season on rabbits was from two to four 
weeks later than it now is, much better sport could 
be had. According to the present game law of the 
Keystone State rabbits cannot be marketed, so the 
number killed this year were not killed for profit. 



fall. These birds are now fully protected by law and 
it is illegal to kill them. Years ago they were ver>' 
numerous, but the slaughter was so great that it 
became necessary for the State Fish and Game Com- 
mission to prohibit their killing altogether in order 
to save tlKMU from lli(> fate of the passenger pigeon, 
now declared to be extinct. 

The wild pigeons that frequented California are 
migratory birds. They come from the north in the 
fall of each year in great flocks. In years gone by 
wlien they were very numerous it was nothing to see 
' several thousand in one flock. They seek foothill 
locations, seldom coming down below an elevation of 
1,500 feet. 

It is quite evident that, under the protection now 
given them, they will become numerous once again 
and will be one of California's best game birds at 
some future date, when it will be permissible to kill 
them in small numbers. 



Trappers coming into Chico from the Sacramento 
river bottoms west of the city report an unusually 
successful season. The catches of small fur-bearing 
animals have been good and the prices are high. They 
say the center of the world's fur market now is in 
St. Louis, instead of London. 



Word was received last week from F. C. Hammond, 
who is prospecting in southern Monterey county, that 
he killed a big grizzly bear last week. Mr. Hammond 
was working his way slowly through a thicket, when 
he suddenly heard an ominous growl, and he found 
himself staring a big bear in the face. The bear 
reared on his haunches with a snarl and Hammond 
promptly shot him with his rifle. The animal was 
only about fifteen feet away when discovered by the 
hunter. 

o 

PATTBERG HIGH GUN AT SHELL MOUND. 



George A. Pattberg scored 225, 231, 232 and 236 
in the monthly rifle competition o fthe Golden Gate 
Rifle and Pistol Club at Shell Mound Park on Sun- 
day. Pattberg's score of 236 is better by two points 
than the highest score made in 1915. 

The clubs practicing on the Shell Mound range 
were represented by their best talent, and only 
expert marksmen recorded good scores. Following 
were the best scores of the day: 

Golden Gate Rifle and Pistol Club's monthly medal 
shoot— George A. Pattberg 225, 231, 232, 236; Ben 
Jonas, 223; E. Schierbaum, 208, 206, 216, 206; M. W. 
Hoousner, 218, 221. 227; K. O. Kindgren, 215; W. F. 
Blasse, 226; Martin Blasse. 213: E. W. Helm, 227. 

Golden Gate Rifle and Pistol Club's pistol scores — 
Dr. R. A. Summers, 80, 80; C. T. Sisson, 84; C. W. 
Whaley, 86, 89, 86; E. W. Helm, 65, 69, 83; W. C. 
Pritchard. 90, 94, 92, 91, 94; C. W. Randall, 96, 93. 

Swiss Rifle Club's monthly medal shoot — John Frei, 
216, 211: F. Muehlebach, 215, 213; Charles Ott, 210. 
191; H. Perrin, 208, 207; A. Schwarz, 206. 205; J. A. 
Sutter, 204, 181: J. R. Stalder, 200. 198; L. Hauser. 
194, 191; Charles Bachmann. 194; Henry Tschopp, 
185, 187. 

Swiss Rifle Club's monthly bullseye shoot — J. R. 
Stalder, 265; John S. Lutenegger, 340; H. Tschopp, 
732; L. Hauser. 960; A. E. Hintermann, 1072; J. A. 
Sutter, 1140; H. Perrin. 1227; C. Bachmann. 1320; 
A. von Weyl, 1342; J. Iten. 1400; Charles Ott. 1412; 
F. Muehlebach. 1450; John Frei, 1500; A. Schwarz, 
1045. 

Norddeutscher Schuetzen Club's monthly medal 
shoot--F:. Schierbaum. 211, 205; G. W. Dieckmann. 
208; August Westphal, 208, 202, 186; P. F. Rathjens, 
201, 199; John de Wit, 197, 194, 186. 

Independent Rifles' monthly medal shoot, best 
scores of the day--M. Andressen. 60; P. Schong. 59; 
Major B. Hilken, 59; Lieutenant J. Siebe. 44; Ser- 
geant R. H. Hilken, 48; H. Marzolf. 49; J. Wesler- 
gud. 45; E. Abraham, 49; Sergeant L. Mayer. 39; 
C. Edel, 37; J. M. Han.sen, 44; Lieutenant P. Volk- 
man. 38; Corporal J. Meinke, 36; J. Steiger, 38; H. 
Schlichtmann Jr., 33. 

Company A, Irish Vohinteers, monthly medal 
slioot- Captain J. F. Waters, 90; William Gaul, 92; 
M. Gaul, 84; T. Moynihan. 78; B. Reilly, 65: J. F. 
McArdle, 51; Frank Dugan, 89; D. Harnedy, 21. 

o 

HOW WAR AFFECTS BIRDS. 



OPPOSITION TO OAK CREEK HATCHERY. 



Strong opposition has been aroused among South- 
ern California sportsmen over the proposal of the 
California Fish and Game Commission to build a 
hatchery in the Oak creek district, five miles from 
Independence, in the Owens valley. 

The opposition culminated in a meeting held in 
Azuza with W. D. Frederick as the leading spirit and 
Supervisors Hamilton and Henshaw, L. J. Mathews 
of Covina and C. A. Griffith of Azuza among those 
present. A protest has been lodged with Secretary 
Pritchard of the Los Angeles office of the commis- 
sion and a number of sites suggested nmuch closer 
and more accessible than the one in the Owens 
valley. The co-operation of the San Bernardino 
authorities has been sought and granted. 

Ice House canyon near Camp Baldy has been sug- 
gested, as has Grouse creek in Bear valley, the San 
Gabriel river canyon and a number of other places. 
Commissioner Connell's objection to the Ice House 
canyon site is that it is accessible only over a private 
toll road and that material for the hatchery would 
have to pay toll over this road, the same as other 
merchandise, while sportsmen and other visitors 
would also be compelled to pay toll. 

The opponents of the Oak creek site claim that 
the objection to the Ice House canyon site can be 
done away with, and anyway, that other just as good 
sites can be obtained much closer to civilization. 
E. A. Parkford. a prominent fisherman of Ontario, 
is one of those most active in the opposition in San 
Bernardino county. 

n 

FISH NET DEFENDANT IN COURT. 



"One Fish Net." come into court and be sworn. 
You are charged with existing illegally and you are 
to be decapitated, cut to pieces, burned and other- 
wise destroyed, if the proper legal qualification is 
given in a court of justice. But for goodness sake 
do not file a demurrer, because County Clerk Harry 
Saunders of Yolo would not know how to proceed 
in entering the proper order in the big book in his 
office, which is always necessary in such cases made 
and provided. 

There is a case filed in the county court entitled, 
''F. H. Newbert, Carl Westerfeld and M. J. McConnell 
vs. One Fish Net." The complainants are members 
of the Board of Fish and Game Commissioners of the 
Sovereign State of California; the fish net is one 
found last July 17 in a slough between Broderick and 
Davis by Lee Sinkey, and has been in his possession 
ever since. The owner was never located, conse- 
quently to have the legal right to destroy the net, 
suit was brought directly against the unlucky con- 
trivance. 

This is, of course, unfortunate for the net, but the 
dignity of the law must be upheld, so after the legal 
technicalities have been complied with there will be 
a solemn conclave of officialdom and the stern work 
of destruction will proceed with neatness and dis- 
patch. "So mote it be." 

o 

DOGS CARRIERS OF DISEASES. 



The dog in the country is a useful and pleasing 
adjunct to the farm if he is properly controlled and 
cared for, but when neglected may readily become a 
carrier of disease to stock, in addition to gaining op- 
portunity to kill sheep and destroy gardens and other 
property. Dog ordinances, as a general rule, have 
been intended chiefly to curb the dog's power of 
doing harm by attacking, biting, killing, or running 
sheep or stock. The part he plays as a carrier of 
diseases to animals only recently has been recog- 
nized, according to the zoologists of the department, 
who believe that when this is better understood, rural 
ordinances and laws which lessen this danger will 
gain the support of the community. 

In case of the foot-and-mouth disease the dog act.? 
as a mechanical carrier of infection. The dog which 
runs across an infected farm easily may carry in 
the dirt on his f* et the virus of this most contagious 
of animal diseases to other farms and thus spread 
the disease to the neighboring herds. In infected 
localities it is absolutely essential, therefore, to keep 
all dogs chained and never allow them off the farm 
except on leash. 

There are, however, many other maladies in the 
spread of which the dog takes an active part. In 
Bulletin 260 of the Department, "The Dog as a Car- 
rier of Parasites and Diseases," it is pointed out that 
rabies, hydatid, ringworm, favus, double-por(!d tape- 
worm, roundworm and tongue worm are often con- 
veyed to human beings in this way. It occasionally 
happens also that the dog helps fleas and ticks in 
transmitting bubonic plague or the deadly spotted 
fever. 

Hydatid disease is caused by the presence in the 
liver, kidneys, brain, lungs and other organs of a 
bladder worm or larval tapeworm. Bladder worms 
are often as large as an orange and may be larger. 
A dog which is allowed to feed on carrion or the 
raw viscera of slaughtered animals may eat all or 
part of a bladder worm containing numerous tape- 
worm heads. These tapeworm heads develop into 
small segmented tapeworms in the intestines of the 
dog. The tapeworms in turn develop eggs which are 
passed out in the excrement of the dog. They are 
spread broadcast on grass and in drinking water 
where animals can very well eat them and thus be- 



As a part of his plan to instruct the New York 
police force in methods of warfare, Police Commis- 
sioner Woods announced that he has begun the 
organization of a rifle club to be known as "The 
Police Department Rifle Club of the City of New 
York." The federal government has notified liini that 
500 army rifles will be furnished by the War Depart- 
ment. 



Interest in the sport of bait and fly casting is stead- 
ily increasing in the Northwest. Seattle, Wash., is 
now organizing a casting club and expects to be in 
the field next year. The Tacoma organization is in 
a most flourishing condition and is planning for an 
increased activity next season. The Portland, Ore., 
club has announced its intention of liolding a big 
casting tournament next year. This will probably be 
known as the Pacific Coast Tournament and will be 
held early in August, or prior to the international 
tournament at Newark. The Tacoma club may also 
hold a tournament. 



Reports from Grass Valley are to the effect that 
hundreds of wild pigeons have been seen there this 



The tumult of arms and the noise of artillery do 
not make the same impression on all kinds of birds. 
Whereas some do not se(>m at all exercised nor 
affected, others are terrified and take flight, so says 
a writer in L'Ami des Animaux, Geneva, from which 
we have translated the following; 

In the north of France, in the midst of the horrors 
of battles, blackbirds stay in the bushes or hedges, 
practising the strictest neutrality. The lark delights 
the combatants with his morning song. A pair of 
swallows made their nest in the heart of the trenches, 
where, due to the humanitv of the soldiers, they were 
not allowed to want for anything. The starling and 
the gray bunting have no fear of the war. On the 
contrary, the yellow bunting, the tltmou.se. the chaf- 
finch, and the goldflnch. have almost entirely dls- 
ai)peared. The partridges and the buzzards fly with 
all the strength of their wings to escape bombs and 
bullets. 

England has become a place of refuge, a sort of 
terrestrial paradise for these fugitive birds. But 
there also they may be reached at times by the 
flying projectiles. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 15, 1916. 




FEED AND CARE OF THE DAIRY 
HEIFER. 



Although the first few months of 
the heifer's life are the most critical 
period of her existence, many calves 
are stunted, due to lack of attention 
after being weaned. 

It Is a rather common practice to 
have cows calve in the spring, yet 
this is not usually the best time. It 
is a fact that a calf born in the fall 
will get a better start in life than one 
born in the spring. 

It makes little difference in the rate 
of growth of a calf whether it has pas- 
ture or has only dry feed in connec- 
tion with its milk. But after weaning 
time the calf that has pasture will 
make by far the cheaper and more 
rapid growth. A fall calf will also be 
ready for breeding so that it will drop 
its own calf in the fall at the age of 
two years. 

Until a calf is weaned it receives 
,9, liberal allowance of protein in its 
,milk, but when milk is removed from 
the ration it is necessary to supply 
protein in some other form, such as 
legume hay or a high protein concen- 
trate. It is advisable to keep the 
heifer in a thrifty, growing condition, 
although there is no need of fattening 
her. However, if she does not become 
rather plump it will not injure her 
dairy qualities. 

If fed so as to produce a thrifty 
growth, yet not produce fat, dairy heif- 
ers will gain on an average close to 
one pound daily from the age of six 
months up to two years, or calving 
time. 

For heifers from six to twelve 
months old the following rations will 
give good results: 

Ration 1. — About two pounds daily 
of a mixture of seventy-five pounds 
com chop and twenty-five pounds 
bran: all the alfalfa hay the heifer 
will eat. 

Ration 2. — Six to ten pounds silage; 
about two pounds daily of a grain 
mixture of forty pounds corn chop, 
forty pounds linseed meal or cotton- 
seed meal, and twenty pounds bran; 
all the alfalfa hay the heifer will eat. 

For heifers ont to two years old the 
following rations are finely adapted: 

Ration 1. — About three pounds of 
com daily; all the alfalfa hay the 
heifer will eat. 

Ration 2. — Com silage, twelve to 20 
pounds; about three pounds daily of 
a grain mixture of equal parts corn 
chop, bran and linseed meal or cotton- 
seed meal; all the alfalfa hay the 
heifer will eat. 

The proper age at which to breed a 
heifer will depend very largely upon 
the size and thrift of the animal, as 
well as upon the breed. — Bulletin Ne- 
braska Experiment Station. 



LIVESTOCK IVIEN TO MEET. 



President Dwight B. Head of the 
American National Livestock Associa- 
tion has made a call for the 19th an- 
nual convention to be held at El Paso, 
Texas, January 25, 26 and 27, 1916, the 
convention to be called to order at 10 
o'clock Tuesday, January 25; morning 
sessions only. 

Many subjects will be discussed at 
this meeting, among them being the 
following: 

Federal control of public grazing 
lands; the 640-acre grazing homestead 
bill; administration of forest reserves: 
eradication of poisonous plants; mar- 
keting of livestock and its products; 
delays at terminals; stockyard facili- 
ties; financing livestock loans: valua- 
tions in railroad livestock contracts: 
charge for cleaning and disinfecting 
cars; railroad rates and services: re- 
cent cases before the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission: suppression of the 
foot and mouth and other infectious 
diseases: sanitary regulations of dif- 
ferent states; prohibition of the impor- 
tation of livestock and animal products 
from countries where contagious dis- 
eases exist; inspection of meats and 
hides from Mexico; protection of 
American livestock owners and ranch- 
men in Mexico: livestock conditions in 
foreign countries; destruction of pred- 



iUory animals: exports and imports of 
li\estock and meats; meat-inspection 
law: prohibitive tax on oleomargarine: 
needed legislation: reports of officers 
and standing committees. 

Prominent cattlemen will be present 
to take part in the meeting. An inter- 
esting program will be prepared, but 
free and open discussion on all sub- 
jects in which stockmen are interest- 
ed will be welcomed. Representatives 
of the Bureau of Animal Industry and 
the United States Forest Service will 
be present. 

o 

WHAT FARM IMPLEMENTS HAVE 
DONE. 



The influence of the plow on pro- 
duction is remarkable. It is said that 
man and the plow have been devel- 
oped side by side. And it is a question 
whether the plow has not had more to 
do with man's development than any 
other agent with which he has been 
asociated. The story of agriculture is 
intimately associated with the devel- 
opment of farm implements. And the 
manner in which improved implements 
have increased production, afforded 
more time for education and recrea- 
tion will never fully be known, nor can 
it be duly appreciated. 

The nation that grows and increases 
in population, in wealth and in human 
intelligence must have an abundance 
of food. That economy requires that 
most of the food necessary to the sup- 
port of the people be produced at 
home will not be questioned. The 
clanger, the distress and the enormous 
expense of providing food for a people 
cut off on account of war is now evi- 
dent to those who read the horrors 
caused by the present conflict of arms 
in Europe. 

Primitive peoples existed, conquered 
or were overcome according to the 
food supply. The Gauls were a mighty 
people largely because they were pro- 
ducers. Pliny the elder tells us the 
reason. He describes their fields and 
g'ves a description of the implements 
they used. The Indians had vast acre- 
age over which to roam. The number 
was not more than 400,000 people, yet 
they were not able to subsist and in- 
crease in population because of their 
crude way of tilling the soil to pro- 
cure food, as the hunting and fishing 
failed. Only those tribes that were 
skilled in tilling the soil and which 
learned to use farm implements have 
met the new conditions of civilization. 

A noticeable change in the length 
of the working day has been made 
since the use of improved implements 
has become general. Harvest was 
oncea very laborious task that re- 
quired heavy physical strain from ear- 
Ij dawn till dusk. Now the header 
or the binder finishes the work in a 
very short time and the men are re- 
leased for other work. Formerly as 
much as 16 hours a day was spent in 
the field, but now even in harvest time 
the working day is seldom longer than 
10 hours. 

Farm laborers were afraid that im- 
proved implements would reduce 
wages, but the contrary was the re- 
sult. According to McMaster in 1794, 
in the state of Pennsylvania, the 
wages of the common laborer was not 
more than $3 per month, and "in Ver- 
mont good men were employed for 18 
pounds s terling a year." In 1849 
wages did not exceed $120 a year. Now 
farm laborers are sought and they 
are offered two. three and even five 
times such prices. This is not the case 
in some countries where hand labor 
in general, Asia for instance. There 
men work from early morning till late 
at night for 14 cents a day. Women 
receive from nine to ten cents a day 
and children from seven to eight cents 
a day in some of these countries. 

The cost of production on our 
American farms has decreased, al- 
though labor is paid better than ever 
before. This is largely the result of 
better implements and machines. Ac- 
cording to the 13th census it required 
three hours and three minutes to pro- 
duce a bushel of wheat under hand 
labor methods: now it takes but nine 
minutes and 58 seconds with improved 
implements and machines. The cost 
was 20 cents a bushel in 1829 and 1830 
when produced by hand; in 1895 and 
1896 a bushel of wheat cost but 10 
cents. It required 11 hours of man 
labor to cut and cure a ton of hay in 
1899; a few years ago it required one 
hour and 39 minutes with machinery. 



The cost of a ton of hay was thus re- 
duced from 83 1-3 cents to 16 ',4 cents. 

Machinery has improved the qutlity 
of farm products. It was once neces- 
sary to begin harvest before crops 
were ripe; now it takes but a few 
days, hence the quality of the prod- 
uct is greatly improved under present 
methods. Grain is cleaner, purer and 
heavier than when tramped out with 
animals or when beaten out with a 
flail. 

It is not too much to say that the 
manufacture and use of improved 
fp.rm machinery is very greatly re- 
sponsible for the growth and value of 
agriculture in this country. This is 
a nation of farmers and of farm prod- 
ucts. Farm implements have relieved 
the laborer of much drudgery: made 
his work and his hours of service 
shorter; stimulated his mental facul- 
ties; given an equilibrium of effort to 
mind and body; made the laborer a 
more efficient producer, a broader man 
and a better citizen. — From Farm and 
Ranch. 

o 

TRANSPLANTING PREPARATIONS. 



Early preparation of the orchard 
Irnd for transplanting will be highly 
desirable for best results with the 
home orchard. It will be easier to 
transplant, there will be less likeli- 
hood of loss in trees and the trees 
will begin growth under better cir- 
cumstances if early preparations be 
made. 

The mistake should not be made of 
v.aiting till time to transplant, then 
stake off. dig the holes in the grand 
ground, then hurriedly transplant with 
a view of breaking between the trees 
later. This plan has been followed 
too often and always means poor prep- 
aration, unnecessary work in setting 
the trees and poor growth the first 
year. 

The change that takes place with 
the transplanting of the tree and its 
adaptation to its new condition is con- 
siderable. A young tree taken from 
the nursery row, trimmed and set in 
the orchard needs the best possible 
preparation of the soil so it may cal- 
lous the roots, send out fine root hairs 
to take hold of the soil and begin to 
nourish the tissues of the tree. 

The work of transplanting will be 
very little when the soil is prepared 
properly. It doesn't take much time 
nor labor to dig holes and set a tree 
in soft mellow land that has been pre- 
pared for trees. 

No one knows what the weather will 
bo in the spring. We sometimes have 
drouth. A good way to store up soil 
moisture is to break the soil as early 
as possible, pulverize it as well as it 
can be done with the harrow, the 
disc, etc., and then make the best pos- 
sible use of rains that fall early. 

One need not wait till spring to 
transplant fruit and shade trees, 
shrubs, etc. They can be transplant- 
ed most any time in winter here in the 
west. In fact, they are more likely to 
live and begin growth under proper 
conditions when transplanted early 
than if left till spring. 

o 

FOOD SUPPLY OF THE FARM 
HOME. 



Much public interest has been excit- 
ed by the recent announcement of the 
I nited States Public Health Service, 
to the effect that the development of 
the disease known as pellagra in hu- 
m.an beings depends on faulty diet. 
Among the suggestions of the Public 
Health Service for the modification of 
diet to prevent the development of 
pellagra are a number of items which 
emphasize the importance of the cam- 
paign of the department and the State 
Agricultural Colleges to increase the 
production of food supplies on the 
farm, especially to bring about a home 
supply of meat, eggs, milk, and butter. 

Among other specific recommenda- 
tions of the Public Health Service 
are: — 

(a) The ownership of a milk cow; 
an increase of milk production for 
home consumption. 

(b) Poultry and egg raising for 
home consumption. 

(c) Stock raising. 

(d) Diversification and cultivation 
of food crops. 

These four specifications give an 
added argument for the campaign of 
livestock raising and farm diversifica- 
tion, which has been especially urged. 



THE BEST LINIMENT 

OR PAIN KILLER FOR THE HUMAN BODY 

^ Gombault's - ^ 

Caustic Balsam 

IT HAS NO EQUAL 



iog.noothiDft and 
bMllDK. ftiid for all Old 

Exterior CkDct 

Human B^^lo'^", 

CAUSTIC DiLSAM h«i 



F.l„; 



Body r 



We would say lo all 
who buy it thai il does 
not contain a particle 
of poisonous substance 
and therefore no harm 
can result from its ex- 
ternal use. Persistent, 
thorough use will cure 
many old or chronic 
ailmenti and it can be 
used on any case thai 
requires an outward 
application with 
perfect safely. 



Periectly Saf« 
and 

Reliable Remedy 
tor 

Sore Throat 
Chest Cold 
Backache 
Neuralgia 
Sprains ^ 
Strains 
Lumbago 
Diphtheria 
Sore Lungs 
Rheumatism 
and 
all StiH Joints 



REMOVES THE SORENESS -STRENGTHENS MUSCLES 

Cornhm, T»T. — "Ono li..ttle Cauallo Oslsam did 
my rh«umfttiam mor« good than SI.'M <i'J i">id in 
doctor ibiJli •■ OTTO A nf VtR, 

Pries » 1 .BO p«r bottle. Sold by drungnH, or tent 
bf ui e<pr«ai prepaid. Write (or Pookli-t 

The LHWRENCE WILLIIIMS COMPANY. Cleveland. D 



Classified Advertising 



PERCHERON STALLION WANTED. 

Will buy, lease or trade. Must be 
blocky and registered. 

J. H. NELSON, 
Box 361, Selma, Cal. 



FOR SALE— I?lack McKinney stallion 
find mare — brother and si-ster. — 7 and 8 
.years old. Standard and Registered. 
I5oth converted to high class gaited sad- 
dle horses. — single foot, running walk, etc. 
L.ady can ride; perfectly sound. Make 
excellent cross with any highly bred 
stock. They are both ribbon winners in 
.■<ho\v ring. Can be seen at San Francisco 
Hiding School, 701 Seventh Ave. Phone 
Pacific 16r,r,. OSCAK ROMAXDER. 



FOR SALE. 

BEST POLICY 42378, one of the best 
bred horses in the world. Handsome bay 
horse, small star in forehead, left hind 
pa.stern and left fore heel white. Has size, 
heavy boned, stylish, pure gaited trotter, 
.sdund. and a splendid individual in every 
respect. Best Policy is by Allerton ril28, 
dam Exine 2:18Vi by Expedition, next 
dam Euxine by Axtell, next dam Russia 
by Harold 413. next dam Miss Russell, 
dam of Maud S., etc. Best Policy has 
trttted a mile on the Hanford half mile 
track in 2:12. He is ten years old and 
with little training would make a good 
gome race horse, and ninety percent of 
his colts are trotters. He will be sold at 
a great sacrifice. For price and further 
particulars address 

BREEDER & SPORTSMAN, 
P. O. Box 447. San Francisco, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

The flve-year-old pacer The Fool, trial 
this season with limited opportunity in 
2:11. halves in 1:03, quarters in 30 sec- 
onds. A pleasure to drive this fellow and 
an amateur will drive him in better than 
ten in the matinees next sea.son. 

Also Oro Bond, three-year-old. But for 
a slight injury late in the season would 
have been heard- from in the stakes this 
year. He is now sound and ready for 
.some one to point for the races next year. 
Will make a sure enough racehorse. These 
two priced to sell. 

Breeding and price on application. 

DR. I. L. TUCKER, 

Oroville, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

New "Ideal McMurray " light track cart for 
niBtinees. workouts, sueediiiK and jogging. First- 
class, down to date cart, weight I.*) to M pound), 
(ireat strength and carrying power, absolute 
freedom of any horee motion. Cointtucted from 
the Ijest second growth white hickory. Jiest 
guaranteed grade of pneumatic tires, handsome- 
ly tinished la rich carmine or royal blue, with 
brass screen dash, detachable, and accessoriel 
consisting of serviceable foot pump, complete 
tool and repaii kit. wrenches, oil can. etc., etc. 
Weight crated !»0 pounds, llrand now and will 
be stiipped to any address. For price address: 
F. W. KELLEV, 

Hl'.F.KHF.lt .\NI) Sl'ilRTSMAK. 



HIGH-CLASS TROTTING BRED COLTS 
FOR SALE. 
No. 1. Three-year-old filly sired by All 
Style, dam Dr. Hicks. This Ally is regis- 
tered. 

No. 2. Two-year-old colt, full brother 
to the above. 

No. 3. Two-year-old filly sired by Dan 
Logan, dam a Wilkes mare who was a 
groat natural pacer but unfortunately was 
crippled by a barbed wire accident as a 
yearling and was never worked. 

The All Styles are large, strong built, 
with all the style of their sire, perfect in 
action, and all three of the above colts 
should make race horses second to none. 
The Dan Logan filly is perfectly gentle to 
handle and drive and is a high-class filiy 
in every respect. Apply to or address. 

I. F. EATON, ChIco, Cal. 



Saturday, January 15, 1916.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



13 



/ 



BE/\UTIFUL BELVEDERE 



7 



LOTS FOR SALE 



CORINTHIAN ISLAND Subdivision to Belvedere is the 
most beautiful spot on the shores of San Francisco Bay 
for a suburban home. It commands an extensive view of 
the City of San Francisco, Alcatraz and Angel Islands, 
Raccoon Straits, San Francisco Bay, Richardson's Bay, 
the Berkeley shore, beautiful Belvedere and Mt. Tamal- 
pais. It is in Marin County, directly opposite San Fran- 
cisco, and forms the eastern shore of Belvedere cove. 
It has a naturally terraced, sunny, western slope that is 
well adapted for many choice residence sites, every one 
affording most picturesque views of the bay and moun- 
tain. It is protected from the prevailing western trade winds in 
summer by Belvedere Island, and from the southerly storms in 
winter by Angel Island. The soil is fertile and part of the island 
is well wooded. 

It is less subject to fog than any other place near San 
Francisco. The summer fog, as it rolls in from the ocean, splits 
on the western slope of Sausalito, part of it flowing in a line with 
Angel Island towards the Berkeley shore, and part of it along 
the southern slope of Mt. Tamalpais, leaving Belvedere, Corin- 
thian Island and Raccoon Straits in the bright sunlight, while 
the fog banks can be seen as a white wall both to the north and 
the south. 

There is very little available land about the shores of San 
Francisco Bay that is desirable for homes, especially for those 
who love boating and kindred sports. The Alameda and Contra 
Costa shores of the bay are the lee shores and receive the full 
brunt of the boisterous trade winds which lash the shoal waters 
near the land into muddy waves, making boating both unpleas- 
ant and dangerous. To the north of the city and in Marin 
County the land from Sausalito to the entrance of the bay is a 
Government reservation and will never be placed on the market. 
The shores of Richardson's Bay are not at present convenient 
to boat service and, aside from Belvedere and Corinthian Island, 
there is little or no land near any ferry landing that possesses 
the natural advantages, improvements and possibilities that are 
offered on Corinthian Island. Concrete roads, pure water, tele- 
phone service and electric light wires are already installed. It is 
only ten minutes' walk from any point on the property to 
Tiburon boats, and but forty-three minutes' ride to the foot of 
Market Street. 

On the point of Corinthian Island the Corinthian Yacht 
Club has had its home for many years, and on any summer day 
the white sails of its numerous fleet add to the charming scene, 
as the trim yachts glide about the cove. Excellent fishing of all 
kinds for bay fish, including salmon, the gamey striped bass, 
rock fish and the toothsome silver smelt, is to be had in the cove. 
There is probably no spot so accessible and in such close prox- 
imity to any large city in the world that offers the attractions 
of climate, magnificent scenery, fishing and boating as will here 
be found. 



FOR MAPS, PRICES AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO 



S. L. PLANT. 

PLANT RUBBER AND SUPPLY CO., 

32 BEALE STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 



6"B. 



F. W. KELLEY. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN OFFICE, 

366 PACIFIC BUILDING 

San Francisco, Cal. 



14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 15, 1916. 



FLOOD WATER GOES TO WASTE. 



Hundred.s of dry land farmers stand 
in their yards after every spring and 
summer rain and watch increased hay 
and pasture yields go swirling down 
every creek and coulee in the shape of 
the waste of flood water. Water in a 
country of limited rainfall is the most 
important agricultural factor. Yet 
thousands of dollars' worth of it is al- 
lowed to go to waste each season 
through negligence in conserving it. 

This flood water is and can be used 
by dry land farmers in two ways. The 
easiest and cheapest, though not the 
best, method of getting dollars out of 
this waste is by catching the flood wa- 
ter as it runs down the coulee and 
spreading it over the hay and pasture 
areas by means of a small dam and 
ditches. A small earthen dam should 
be built in the coulee at a point higher 
than the highest spot in the field 
which is to be flooded. Not less than 
one inch of fall for every 100 feet of 
ditch should be allowed. 

In determining the site for the dam, 
levels should be run from the highest 
point in the field to a point high 
enough up the coulee or creek so that 
the ditch connecting the two will have 
sufficient fall to carry the water. If 
it is not practical to put the dam as 
high up as this the best site should be 
first determined, then the ditches run 
out on one or both sides of the coulee 
10 best advantage. If a level or transit 
is not available a ditcher's triangle or 
carpenter's level and board can be 
made on the farm and used with rea- 
sonable accuracy. 

In most cases these ditches can be 
dug with the plow, and home made 
ditch slips, or by means of a small 
road grader to be pulled by four or six 
horses. The ditch above the land to 
be flooded should be wide and shal- 
low, the size depending on its length 
and the amount of water to be han- 
dled. Below the ditch, furrows and 
smaller lateral ditches following the 
contour of the land will be of great 
assistance in handling the flood water. 
In fields of gentle, even slope these 
will not be needed, provided the slope 
is long enough to handle all the water 



without waste. 

The best practice is for the owner to 
build his main ditches and then ob- 
serve carefully the manner in which 
the water spreads over the ground 
after it leaves the ditch. He will find 
that he can improve the overflow from 
the ditch by deepening it in places 
and perhaps by building check dams 
in it, if it is not spreading the water 
evenly. Then by watching the water 
as it spreads across the field, he will 
find that a few furrows or shallow 
ditches will spread it more evenly and 
assist in holding it on the land for a 
greater period of time. In some sec- 
tions under more favorable conditions 
a definite system similar to terraces 
could be worked out to advantage. 

Flood water can be used in this way 
on hay and pasture fields, but it is 
not generally advisable on grain and 
cultivated fields. The water and silt 
are hard to control, are apt to cause 
lodging and uneven growth and ripen- 
ing. There is also danger of washing. 
When used on alfalfa and hay fields 
care should be taken that the field is 
not flooded when the hay is heavy or 
after it is cut. At this time the ditches 
should be closed and the water direct- 
ed down the coulee. 

The experience of a number of farm- 
ers who are using flood water in this 
way is that alfalfa fields will yield a 
good ton more to the acre, that smaller 
but good gains can be expected on 
other meadow, and that the pastures 
will double in feeding value. 

The best results are obtained by 
spreading the water slowly over a 
small area and holding it as long as 
possible on it, rather than letting it 
run hit and miss over a large area. — 
Geo. E. Piper in Agricultural Age. 

ASHES VALUABLE AS FERTIL- 
IZER. 



The farmer who burns wood for 
heating and cooking should carefully 
store the ashes, and not permit them 
to leach, as they have a peculiar fer- 
tilizing value. They not only contain 
potash and phosphoric acid in appre- 
ciable amounts, but also contain mag- 
nesia and lime, and when applied to 



the land they also act indirectly to 
increase the available nitrogen con- 
tent of organic matter in the soil. 

Ordinary house ashes contain on the 
average about 8 or 9 per cent of pot- 
ash and 2 per cent of phosphoric acid. 
Investigators have considered that 
there is enough potash and phosphoric 
acid in a bushel of ashes to make it 
worth 20 or 25 cents. Besides that, 
some 10 or 15 cents additional might 
be allowed for the "alkali power" of 
the ashes. This power is that which 
enables ashes to rot weeds and to fer- 
ment peat. The potash content of 
ashes will be lost if they are permitted 
to leach, and care should be taken to 
store them in a dry place. 

o— ■ 

FARM HANDICRAFT CLUB. 



To encourage boys and girls, espe- 
cially those in the country, to spend 
their spare moments during the fall 
and winter months usefully, the de- 
partment's directors of juvenile club 
work in the North and West, working 
in co-operation with the State colleges 
of agriculture, have developed plans 
for boys and girls. The purpose of 
these clubs is two-fold: First, to main- 
tain interest in the agricultural club 
during the season when active work in 
the field and garden is suspended, and, 
second, to develop manual skill in 
members through practical work that 
readily may be correlated by teachers 
with the manual-training work of the 
school as well as with the agriculture 
of the farm and the domestic activi- 
ties of the home. 

The work is so planned as to be 
C'pable of extension throughout the 
year. While effort will be directed 
primarily toward interesting members 
oi the agricultural and home economic 
clubs in these activities, membership 
is to be open to children 10 to 18 years 
of age. 

These clubs will be directed much 
as are the corn clubs, girls' gardening 
clubs, canning clubs, and other organ- 
izations aimed to give skill and ex- 
perience in raising crops or animals 
ov in utilizing by-products of the farm. 
The leaders of the clubs will supply 



the members with specially prepared 
circulars of direction, in which are to 
be included working drawings and 
lists of materials for accomplishing 
the different projects. 

The clubs, while directly vocational, 
also will be designed to minister 
somewhat to the winter social needs 
of children and will provide for ex- 
hibits and even for contests. Mem- 
bers will be encouraged to select and 
carry through during the year 10 of 
what might be called the handicraft 
units suggested in the list below. This 
list, designed for the guidance of the 
directors of these special clubs, and of 
teachers, offers valuable suggestions 
also to parents who wish to plan use- 
ful activities for their children, and 
should be found suggestive by those 
concerned with the development of al- 
most any type of organized work for 
the amusement and improvement of 
rural children. 



If the sheep grower had his wish, 
there would be no wolf in America. 
The flockmaster thinks that the only 
thing wolf was made for was to kill 
sheep. The lobo must have some other 
calling in life or the good book missed 
fire when it said: "Nothing was made 
in vain." "My opinion of it," says A. 
C. Shubert, president of the largest 
house in the world dealing exclusively 
in American raw furs, "is that the wolf 
is here to give up the ghost and sur- 
render his hide to the furrier, who by 
the way makes economic use of good 
pelts, but has little use for the poor 
ones." 



Winter eggs depend a good deal on 
the food supplied and the following 
has afforded satisfactory results: For 
morning feed, whole wheat. Noon, 
bran mash with meat scraps or house 
scraps and some green food such as 
roots, cabbage or steamed alfalfa. 
Evening, corn and oats mixed. It is 
also important that the hens have 
some grit, as crushed granite or 
crushed oyster shells to furnish lime 
for shell making. The housing is im- 
portant too. The poultry house should 
be well liglited and well ventilated. 



Harpers Weekly and The Breeder and Sportsman 

$5.^ WORTH FOR $3.^ 



Breeder and Sportsman 

One Year, 52 Copies, Regular Price $3 

THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN Is the oldest 
weekly Journal devoted to the Horse west of CHlcago, 
having been established In 1882. This Interest, together 
with the Kennel, Gun, Fishing, Coursing and kindred 
sports receiving the most attention In lis columns; to- 
gether with Agricultural and Dairying Departments, 
under whose headings especial attention Is paid to the 
breeding, etc., of Cattle, Sheep, Hogs, Poultry, and all 
other animals connected with stock raising. 

As an advertising medium to Racing Associations, 
Horsemen, Stock Breeders, Manufacturers of Sulkies, Car- 
riages, Wagons, Agricultural and Dairying Implements 
and Machinery, Sporting Goods, Fanciers, Stock Foods, 
and all others desiring to bring their wares 1o the atten- 
tion of the classes to whose interests the paper is devoted 
within the field mentioned above, the BREEDER AND 
SPORTSMAN will be found Indispensable. 



Harpers Weekly 

Six Months, 26 Copies, Regular Price $2.50 

At no time has It been so evident to Americans as now, 
ihat the most Important thing in the lives of all of us is 
the progress of the European War. 

Next to your daily bread the war Interests you most 
vitally. It may even come to be the most important part 
of your problem of living. 

The periodical of greatest fundamental interest to you 
today is the one that can best report those phases of the 
war that come closest to your country and you. 

Because of connections abroad and at home, HARPER'S 
WEEKLY is that publication. 

As a critical commentary that presents Inside facts, it 
Is the necessary bridge for intelligent readers between 
the daily newspaper and the monthly review. 

You want HARPER'S WEEKLY now. You can get it 
now on trial at a remarkable reduction. 



Send $3.25 Now and Get Them Both 

THIS OFFER is made to all who will send us $3.25 before January 31st, 191G, whether for extension of 
subscription, renewal of subscription or a new^ subscription. Address: 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



P. O. Drawer 447 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Saturday, January 15, 1916.1 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



15 




Get ready now — do not wait until spring is upon you. 
It will pay you to be sure and safe in treating your horse. 

The pxperience of the most successful trainers all favor Save-The-Horse, 
because no other known remedy so perfectly and pcM-nianently cures; — the cure 
made with Save-The-Horse stands every test. 

Procrastination is dangerous. Write today for our 96 page Save-The-Horso 
Book. Remember, it will cost you nothing — describe your case and you will 
get a prompt reply. 

Every bottle is sold with ,t bindiiiR contract to refund money or cure 
any c.ise of Bone andBog Spavin, Thoroughpin, Ringbone (except low). 
Curb, Splint, Capped Hocl<, Wind-Puff, Shoe Boil, Broken Down, 
Injured Tendon and Other Lameness. Horse works as usual. Winter 
or .'^uinnicr. 

TROY CHEMICAL CO., BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



D E. NEWELL. Agent, 80 Bayo Vista Ave., OAKLAND, CAL. 

SAVE-THE-HORSE is sold with Contract by Druggists and 
Dealers Everywhere or we send prepaid on receipt of price. 




TRAINING DISTEMPER. 



Ever hear of this'.' Yes. 
of cour.«e you did. IjiiI 
under difTerpiit namo. 
You have syen it In 

ca«es where the liorse was "overtrained." worked a little too fast and 
regular. The nervous system (r<-t3 the shock , after the voluntary mus- 
cular system has heen taxed too heavily. The trouble starts in the 
mucous surfaces and the diitestive apparatus, too. must then be impair- 
ed. He begins to cough when the glands are materially affected. 

"8POHN8" is your true salvation. It restores the appetite and 
normal functions of the whole system. The action in such cases is re- 
markably rapid and sure for recovery when you use this remedy ac- 
cording to instructions with each bottle. Only 50c and $1 a bottle: $.'> 

and SIO a dozen. Sold by all druggists, horse goods houses, or express prepaid Ijy manufacturers. 
SPOHN MEDICAL CO., Chemists and Bacteriologists, Goshen, Ind., U. S. A. 

Makes Them Sound SMITH'S WONDER WORKER j^^^eiiTSoFd 

Allays fever and Inflammation at once, this must be done to efTect a cure. 
UNEXCELLED AS A REMEDY for bone and bog spavins, curbs, splints, rlnebooes, 
capped hocks, shoe bolls, wind puffs, thoroughplns and bunches of all kinds, bowed, 
strained and ruptured tendons, shoulder, hip and stifle lameness, weak joints, 
sweeny, cording up, throat trouble and rheumatism. Relieves pains and soreness 
without loss of hair or a day's let up. As a leg and body wash It lias no equal, in- 
vigorates and restores the distressed horse between heats and after bard workouts. 
Prica $2.00 p*r bottU, prapaid on raceipt of price f 16.00 por dox.; $10.00 pmr 

E. DETEL8, Pleasanton Cal., Dist-ibuting Agent, for the Pacific CoavL 

W. K. SMITH & CO., Tiffin, Ohio. 




NEW EDITION OF 
JOHN BPLAN'S BOOK 



"LIFE WITH THE TROTTER 



PRICE $3.00 POSTPAID 



"Uf* With the Trotter" gives ua a clear Insight Into the waya and meana to be 
adopted to Increase pace, and preserve It when obtained. Thia work ta replete with 
Intereat, and should be read by all sections of society, aa It IncvJcatea the doctrines at 
yindn^as to the horse from start to flnlah." 



Address, 
P-otfla Bide., 



BREEDER and SPORTSMAN, 
Cor. Market and Fourth 8ta 



P. O. Drawer 447, iteD Franalaeo, Oal 



S. IV. Dixon 



Frank Davey, 

Cutter 



GUNCRAFT 



Exclusive Tailors 
to Men 

=IMPORTERS OF^=r 

HIGH -CLASS WOOLENS 

BUNKERS INVESTMENT BUILDING 
Rooms 405 and 407 

7*2 Market St 49 Geary St. 



HEALD'8 
BUSINESS COLLEGE 

trains for Bualneta and placaa ICa gr»6- 

uataa In potltlona. 
1?1B Van Naaa Avanua. tan Franolaea 

BLAKE MOFFIT & TOWNE 

DEALERS PAPER 

t7-1st St., San Francisco. Cal. 
Blaka, McFall ft Co.. Portland, Ore. 
Blake. Moint and Towns. Los Anfetaa 



By \V. A linictto 



■4 



A modern 
treatise on ^uns, 
^ gun fitting, arn- 

, ^ . munition, wing 

and trap shoot- 
ing. 

The theoretical side 
of the subject has been 
covered with a scientific 
accuracy which makes it 
an up-to-date book of ref- 
erence, and the practical 
side of wing shooting, gun 
fitting, the mastercye, de- 
fects in vision and other 
important questions have 
been treated in a way that 
will enable cither the ex- 
pert or the amateur to de- 
termine if he is shooting with a gun thai fits him and 
how 10 decide upon one that does. It wilt enable 
him to ascertain why he misses some shots and is 
successful with others. The secrets of success in trap 
shooting, as well as the peculiarities in flight of the 
quail, the jacksnipe, the woodcock, the ruffed grouse, 
and the duck family, are illustrated by drawings an I 
described in a way that will facilitate the amateur in 
mastering the an of wing shooting. 

Cartridge board cover, $1.00; Cloih, S1.50 

BREEDER & SPORTSMAN, 
Post Office Drawer 447, San Francisco 





Can You Beat This? 

GUN CLUB — a trap — .a sudden call— the whir 
of a clay bird calling into distance — a shot — a 
broken target — and the thrill of victory. That's 

TRRPSHOOma 

.ilways new — always different — and filled with liorde.s of fnn 
for both expert and beginner. It'.s the kind of a sport that 
makes real men — that devclopes keener mentalities and better 
citizens. An individual s])ort for folks of individuality. 

TRY IT AND SEE 

WRITE FOR BOOKLET "THE SPORT ALLURING" 

Ee le duPont de Nemours & Co. 

POWDER MAKERS SINCE 1802 

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE 

— BRANCHP>: — 

SAN FRANCISCO: Ninth Floor Chronicle Bldg. 
DENVER: Ceutnil Saving.s Bank Building 
SEATTLE: Maynard Building 



Tlilrd Edition Wltliln One Year of Pub- 
lication. 

CARE AND TRAINING OF 
TROHERS AND PACERS 

NEVER before In the history of the 
imWlshing world liaa a horse book 
gone Into a third edition within one 
year of pnhHeatlon. Yet the explanation 
is simple — the hook fills a lonp-felt want. 

Never before has this subject been 
treated In a distinct manner. It has been 
bandied In connection with autohlographies 
of trainers, but such works are out of 
print or out of date, for they were pub- 
lislied 20 years or more aso. Conditions 
^ and metlioda have ehanned since then, 
and former treatises are Just as much 
out of date as the bigh-wbeel sulkies 
then in vogue. 

"Care and Training of Trotters and 
Pacers" Is as n)oilern as a 42-centlnieter 
gun. It does not contain the Ideas of 
one man, liut of 100 of the leading horse- 
men of tlio day, Including Thomas W. 
Murphy, Walter K. Cox, and Edward K. 
Cccrs. These Ideas were converted Into 
hook form by two prominent American 
turf Journalists. 

'J'lils hook enables anyone to do bis own 
earetaklni; and training until It Is time 
to send the colt to n professional trainer, 
or the ONMHT can train and race the colt 
himself. The treatise covers the details 
of a colt's life fi'om the nionu>nt It Is 
foaled until after Its first year's cam- 
Imlgn. Tlie facts are clearly presented. 
Nolhlng Is left to guess work. The lan- 
guage Is lucid. Koth theoretical and 
practical views are outlined and coni- 
I>ared. The Instructions are concise and 
easily uinlerstood. Tlic work ennlalns no 
aihcrlisements — It Is not a catch-penny 
imMliallon that looks big In the adver- 
tisement but proves disappointing when 
rccilved. 

-Many professional trainers have pur- 
chased the l)Ook and have found It In- 
ter<'Btlng. Despite the war, over ."iOO 
copies knvc been sold In Europe and Aus- 
tralia. 

Price $1.00 postpaid. Cloth, 

- illustretcd. 176 pagoa, 6x7 Incboi. 

THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

366 P.iclfIc Bldg., San Francisco, Cal 
or Post Office Drawer 447 



ALL CUTS 
IN THIS PUBLICATION MADE BY 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PHOTO -ENGRAVING CO. 

215 LEIDESOORFF ST., 
San Franclaco, Cal. 

Phone Sutter 5398 



Don't Gut Out 

ASH0EB03L, CAPPED 
HOCK OR BURSITIS 



FOR 




ABSORBINE 

TPADE MARK l»fG.U.S.PAT. OFF. 



will remove tliein and leave no blemishes. 
Reduces any puff or swellinpf. Does not 
blister or remove the hair, and horse can be 
worked. $2 a bottle delivered. Book 6 K free. 

ABSORBINE, JR., the amucptic liniment for min. 
kind. For Buils. bruises. Old SorcJ. Swcllinc!). VarlcoM 
Veins. Varicosities. Allays Pain. Price $1 and tl a botde 
at druL'L'isis or delivered. Will tell mote if you write. 
W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 54 Temple St., Springfield, Maui 

For ial« by LanRley A Michaels, San FraociiiL'&, Caltr,; 
Woodward, Clark A Co , Portland. Ort^ : Cal Diuk A Chem. 
Co., Broiuwlti Prus Co , WeRtern Wholesale Dru;t Co., L<M 
Antrelea, Call; Kirk, Clearv & Cn., Racramento, Calif ; 
Pacific Drag. Co., Seattle, Wa«h.. Spokane Drn^ Co.. 8pc 
kane. Wash.; Cr<nn, Redlngton Co.. San FrancUco. Oal /" 



HOUSEHOLD SUPPLIES:- 

"Smith's Pay th« Freight"— to reiltiou tlio 
liiK'li lost ol liviiiK. M'ml (or our Wholirsale to 
Coiistimcr CataloKtie .*<mith's Cash Store. 110-U 
< la.v .'<trcet. Sun Kraiiclsco. 

Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Every facility to give the best of pio- 
fi>B»lorial servlres to all tmbpii of vetflrlu- 
ary dentistry. Coinplluated caaea trctitad 
■iicceBBfiilly. Calls from out of town 
promptly responded to. 

Tha best work at reaaonabia pricaa 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL 
&30 Fulton St. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Win .F. EG AN. V.M.R.C.5. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 
1166 Ooldan Oat* Av*. 
Branch Hoaplta.1, corner Webatai an-j 
Cta«atn<i« fltr»»f» 
•an Franolaoo, Cal. 



THE OFFICIAL HIGH AMATEUR AVERAGE 



FOR THE YEAR 1915= 



WAS WON BY MR. WOOLFOLK HENDERSON, OF LEXINGTON, KY., USING 



SHELLS 

He Shot at 2800 Registered Targets, Broke 2731; Percentage .9753 

THE HIGHEST YEARLY AMATEUR AVERAGE ON RECORD. 

The wonderful record of Mr. Henderson in 1914, when he won the Four great amateur honors, is still fresh in the minds of the shooting frater- 
nity. In that year he captured the Grand American Handicap, the Single Target and Double Target Championships of the United States and the 
High Amateur Average. His performance in igifj is therefore but the continuation of a marvelous and tlioroughly consistent record, made 
possible by ammunition of superlative quality. 

PETERS SHELLS have been used by the winner of the United States Hight Amateur Average (official) FIVE OUT OF THE PAST SIX YEARS 

THE PETERS CARTRIDGE CO., Pacific Coast Branch, 583-585 Howard Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




The Big Winner In 1915 

The Interstate Association's Official High Professional Average for the season of 1915 was won by 
Charles G. Spencer, of St. Louis, Mo., with the marvelous record of 97.5','f for 5620 targets. Such an 
avera.ge for such a large number of targets not only shows Mr. Spencer's great skill, but also proves the 
uniform and unequalled quality of 

LOADED SHELLS AND SHOTGUNS 

which Mr. Spencer used exclusively. It was this same combination that he used when he made his mar- 
velous straight run of 565 targets — the World's Record. 

Conte.sts for the Season's Trap.«ho<>ting Averages have been held 16 times and 12 of them have been won by 
yy shells or guns, or both, which is undeniable evidence of their superiority. 

Lester German, of Aberdeen. Md.. who was second high for the sea.son. and who also made the greatest score of 
the year for a single tournament — 499 X 500 — u.sed Winchester .shells in performing this great feat. 

.1. Mownell Hawkins, of Baltimore. Md., .shot 7.265 targets in competition during 1915, and made the splendid 
average of U.'i . .'■>6<:!). u.sing Winchester shells and shotguns exclusively — more proof of their uniform shooting <iuali- 



lies. Th. 



Iicrformance.s show the reason why AVinchr.ster .shells and f;uns arc- 



PREFERRED AND USED BY MEN OF ACHIEVEMENT 



Page IS 



LITTLE TALKS WITH SPORTSMEN 



NORTH DAKOTA Charles Brewer, Fargo. Secretary of the North Dakota Game and Fish 
Board of ("ontrol, writes: 'Tor a numlit-r of years I have used Rcmmgton 
"'Kminrp^wc"'*"** guns of different grades, and Remington-fMC shells. I find them an excellent 
combination, possessing high penetration and killing power. ^ / A 
cheerfully recommend them Ijoth as being satisfactory in every respect." /a ama^uaj 



I can c 



OHIO Harry R. romstock, Tiffin, well-known Ohio sportsman. President of hi*; local gun club 
ConMiteatir Bmih Vicc- President of the Ohio Trap Shooters' League, writes: "Have used nearly 

Ai*ri|cs wiih ihe al! makes of shotguns, doubles ami repeaters.. but maintain that wln-n I want to make 
Winnini Cwnbinjiion the best scorc at the trai>s or on ducks, I always pin my faith lo the e<Hxl old Remington 
Pump ( tun and drams of powder in the Arrow or Nit ro Club sfiells. With this combination my gun will 
consistently better an average 1 have never been able to make with my \ ^S'.^.TZ.^i 

other guns. This speaks for itself. ' T^*^^ \ 

OKLAHOMA F- v. Fisficr. of the Capital Cun Club, Oklahoma City, writes: "I have been using 
•*Th I Si I U ■ Remington Pump Ctun at e\'ery tournament and lix'allv, for the past seven 

Sur* Mllce."*"*"' years, and I honestly believe it is l»etter tn-dav than when it left the factory. I 
Difference" never saw a gun like it. In hunting along the Canadian River, sand at tirnes blows 

ijohard that a man has to hunt cover. When other guns hang and clog wi^h sand my Remington is always 
' duty, and in seven years has never hung, stuck, or failed to fire a shell. I never shoot any other| 
• Nitre Club shells. I find them more uniform, and I think a harder shooting shell than 
I sure makes a difference." *— * 




FROM COAST TO COAST 



Pope J9 



Henr>' F. Wihion, champion tr.ipshootcr. Gresham, writes: "I have used a RcminK- 
ton I'umpanil Nitro C'lul) shells for the past two years, and find them very satisfactory. 
I won the State Shoot in May, the Interstate Championship, , */ 

the lloneym.m St. He fhanipionship. and Chingrcn trophy. I J ***fcyt. 

to the Keniington-UMC combination." ' 

C. A. Jobson, of the Loclc Haven Cun Club, Lock Haven, writes: "The first 
and most important step along the route to success in shooting is the selection 
of the gun and ammunition, whether it bo for big game huntmg. tr.apshootmg. 
or target pmctice- all that is, or c.in be di Mred. is found in the Kemrngton-l'MC 
Your creation of the hammerless. solid brt^ech, bottom ejection I'ump (.un puts 
nto the hands of sportsmen the Iwst I'unip I'.un c\er made, either for trap- or lield-shootiriy. while the uni- 
formity and effectiveness of the Arrow and Nitro C lub shells make them the st.ind.yd sh<jtgun ammuni- 
tion of the age. To try this combination means that the consistent user will always St ick to 
it. and the better he becomes acquainted w ith y.iur goods, the more he w ill be pleased with ...f^UrU^ 
Ills rhoicc. I consider Remington arms and ammunition as nearly loo' o perfect as it is ^ 
possible to manufact lire, and it gives me great pleasure to recommend them." 

.Arthur S. Lippack, of Providence, w rites: "I have lieen using one of your Pump 
< luns for the last two years, and think it is the finest duck and trap gun I have 
ever owned. During this time I h:ivc used all kinds of loads and m.iljes of shells 
and have never found one that your Pump would not h.mdie. I have owned 
three other makes of pumps, and have never had one besides the Remington that 
vvould do this." ■f^^ ^i* m^ 



OREGON 



PENNSYLVANIA 

■'too Per Cenl. Perfect" 

Red Hall combination. 



RHODE ISLAND 



PAGES 18 AND 19, FOR INSTANCE — DO YOU WANT THEM All? 

Here is a booklet of shooting and liuntinj; talks by one representative sportsman in each State from 
Maine to California. A complete story in forty-nine chapters — some of the chapters by men you know — 
all by nationally or internationally known sportsmen.. 

If you are a beginner at the shooting sport, here is Experience ready-made for you, without cost. If 
you're a veteran, you'll want to compare notes with these "Been There" Brother Sportsmen — good fellows all. 
A oostal card will bring your free copy of "Little Talks With Sportsmen From Coast to Coast." 



REMINGTON 
Woolworth Building. 



ARMS-UNION METALLIC 
(233 Broadway) 



CARTRIDGE CO. 

New York City 



-THE WORLD'S RECORD!!! 

Mr. Lester German, shooting at the Westy Hogan tournament at Atlantic City, Sep- 
tember 15 to 17, scored 

647 OUT OF 650 TARGETS 
shooting his PARKER GUN, which is the greatest score ever matJe at a Registered 
Tournament. 

At Portland. Oregon. Mr. Peter H. O'Brien scored 241 targets straight, making 
PACIFIC COAST RECORD 

with his Parker gun. 

At San Diego Mr. Henry Pflrrmann won the Pacific Coast Handicap, with Mr. J. Fos- 
ter Couts second. 

At San Francisco, in the California-Nevada State Tournament. Mr. Pflrrmann won 
high average and Mr. Couts won the Championship of California — all of which was 
done with 

PARKER GUNS 

For game shooting afield, enhance the pleasure of the day's sport and improve 
your skill by shooting a small gauge PARKER GUN, pioneer makers of small bores 
in America. Instructive booklet on small bore guns sent free on request. 

For further particulars regarding guns from 8 to 28 gauge, address, 
PARKER BROS., Merlden, Conn. New York Salesroom, 32 Warren Street; 

or A. W. duBray, Residing Agent, San Francisco, P. O. Box 102 



—TRAINING THE HOUND — 

A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON THE TRAINING OF FOX HOUNDS, BEAGLES, 

AND COON HOUNDS. 

The .sy.'^tem of training advocated i.s .simple and effective, so that anyone who car- 
ries out in.struction.s can easily develop a foxhound, a beagle or a coon dog to the 
highest .state of usefulness or organize a pack in which each hound will work Independ-. 
ently and at the same time harnioniou.sly with the others. The .subjects are: The 
Hound'.s Ancestry, History. Instinctive Tendencif.s. English and Native Hounds. Devel- 
oping the Intelligence. Training the Foxhound. Voices and Pace of the Hound, Quali- 
ties of Scent. Mantier.s, Training the Coon Dog, Coon Hunting. Training the Beagle, 
Forming <i P.ick. Field Trial Handling. Faults and Vices. Conditioning. Selecting and 
Rearing Puppies. Kennels and Yards. Disea.ses of Hounds and Their Treatment. The 
chapters on field trial training and handling are alone worth the price of the book, 
which i.s one that every man who loves the voice of a hound should read. 

The book contains 224 pages, is clearly printed, nicely bound, and handsomely Illus- 
trated with bloodhounds, various types of English and American foxhounds, beagles 
and cross-bred dons for 'possum and coon hunting. 

Price, in heavy paper cover, $1; $1.50, postpaid. 

BREEDER ANo isPORTSMAN 

P. O. DRAWER 447, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




VOLUME LXVIII. No. 4. SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 22, 1916. SubscripUon— 13.00 Per Year 




THk. HREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 22, 1916. 



J3,000JMM™ ONLY $2:° TO NOMINATE MARE 6UARANTEED $3,000 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stal(es No. 16 

TO BE GIVEN BY THE 

Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association 

For Foals of Mares Covered in 1915 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old 

Entries Close February 1, 1916 




$1600 for Trotting Foals. 
$150 to Nominators of Dams of Winners 



$1100 for Pacing Foals 
$100 to Owners of Stallions 




$1000 for Three-Year-Old Trotters. 

50 to the Nominator of Ihe Dam on whose Original Entry is named the Winner of 
Three-Year-Old Trot. 
600 for Two-Year-Old Trotters. 

25 to the Nominator of the Dam on whose Original Entry is named the Winner of 
Two-Year-Old Trot. 

50 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when Mare 
was bred. 



$700 for Three-Year-Old Pacers. 

50 to the Nominator of Ihe Dam on whose Original Entry Is named the Winner of 
Three-Year-Old Pace. 
400 for Two-Year-Old Pacers. 
25 to the Nominator of the Dam on whose Original Entry Is named the Winner of 
Two-Year-Old Pace. 

50 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace when Mare 
was bred. 



SPECIAL CASH PRIZES FOR STALLION OWNERS. 

Given to Owners of Stallions standing highest in number of Mares nominated in Ihi.s Stake tii.it were bred to their respective horses, divided as follows: 

FIRST PRIZE, $35; SECOND PRIZE, $15. 

Th* Above Prizes will be Paid on February 20ih, 1916 

ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS — $2 to nominate mare on February 1. 191G; when name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given; $5 August 1, 1916; 
$10 on Yearlings January 1. 1917; $10 on Two-Year-Olds January 1. 1918; $10 on Three-Year-Olds Januarv 1. 1919. 

STARTING PAYMENTS.— $25 to start in the Two-Year-Old Pace; $35 to start in the Two-Year-Old Trot; $35 to start in the Three-Year-Old Pace; $50 to start in the 
Three-Year-Old Trot. All Starting P.ayments to be made ten days before the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 

Nominators must designate when making payments to start whether the horse entered is a Trotter or Pacer. 

Colts that start at Two Years Old are not barred from starting again In the Three-Year-Old Divisions. 

CONDITIONS: 

The races fnr Two-Year-Olds will be mile heats, 2 In 3, not to exceed three heats, a, id if not decided in two heats, will be finished at the end of the third heat and money 
divided according \o rank in the summary; and for Three-Year-Olds — three hea's, money divided 25 per cent to the first heat, 25 per cent to the second heat, 25 per cent to the 
tnird heat, and 25 per cent to 1he race according to rank in the summary. Money in each division 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. Should two or more horses be tied for first 
ol.ice at the completion of the third heat, such horses only shall contest in a fourth heat and money divided according to rank in the summary at the termination of that heat. 
A horse having won the first two heats and drawn or distanced in the third heat shall net lose position in the summary. Distance for Two-Year-Olds, 150 yards; for Three- 
Year-Olds, 100 yards. 

If a mare proves barren or slips or has a dead foal or twins; or if either the mare or foal dies before January 1, 1917, her nominator may sell or transfer his nomination or 
substitute another mare or foni, regardless of ownership; but there will be no return of a payment, nor will any entry be liable for more than amount paid in or contracted for. 
In entries, the name, color and pedigree of mare must be given; also the name of the horse to which she was bred in 1915. 

JOntries must be accompanied by entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amount^ paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $3000, the amount of the guar- 
antee, only. 

Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacing divisions. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these Stakes in case the number of entries received is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors. 
Money divided in each division of the Stake 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division or heat than there are starters. 
Entries open to the world. Membership not required to enter; but no horses, wherever owned, will be allowed to start until the owner has become a member. 

Write for Entry Blanks to 

E. P. HEALD, F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 

President. P. O. Drawer 447. 366 Pacific Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



Pedigrees Tabulated 

= — ^TypewrHten, Suitable For Framing = — 
Registration Standard-Bred Horses Attended to 

Stallion Service Books, $1.00 
Stallion Folders 

with picture of the horse and ternia on first page; complete tabulated pedigree 
on the two inside pages and description on back page 

Stallion Cards for Posting 

size, one-half sheet, 14x22; size one-tliird sheet, 11x14 

Stallion Cards 

two aidea, size 3^ x 6J^, to fit envelop 

ADDRESS 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 



366 PACIFIC BLDG. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Saturday, January 22, 1916] 



■i-HE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
Turf and Sporting Authority on the Pacific Coast. 
(Established 18S2.) 
Published every Saturday. 
F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACFIC BUILDING 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
National Newspaper Bureau. Agent, 219 East 23rd St., 

New York City. 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco P. O. 



Terms — One year, $3; six months, J1.75; three months, $1. 

Foreign postage $1 per year additional; Canadian postage 
50c per year additional. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or regis- 
tered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 
447, San Francisco. California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



"GREATER LOVE HATH NO MAN THAN THIS." 



Down in the heart of the Totrero, the name by 
wtich is known the major portion of the industrial 
and manufacturing settlement of San Francisco's 
great south side, there lived until a few days ago a 
quaint little wisp of a man in whose heart were 
instilled in generous quantities true attributes of 
greatness and nobility. Who he was or whence he 
came was known to none, but some mother bore 
him, and loved him, and taught him well in child- 
hood; to what heights he had at some time attained 
or aspired cannot be said, and the years, in their 
passing, had robbed him not only of physical strength 
and mental power but had stripped him of identity 
as well. For years he had lived in a tumble-down 
little shack and eked out a precarious existence at 
odd jobs at whitewashing, owning a rickety cart and 
an equally rickety mule, sharing, with the latter, such 
shelter as he po.«5sessed. To the community at large 
he was known only as Old Jimmy Allaround, and his 
mule as Jimmy Whiskers. 

Day in and day out, uncomplaining and uncom- 
plained against, the decrepit old-time partners waged 
an unequal battle against the world around them. 
To most people theirs would seem an existence of 
squalid misery, but such is far from being true, for 
into the depths where they made their daily rounds 
there pierced a w^arm and cheering ray that made 
life beautiful — the ray of love and human kindliness. 
Daily when their work was done, or on the many, 
many days when there was no work for them to do, 
there assembled to worship at their shrine the chil- 
dren of the neighborhood. These brought with them 
offerings of potato peelings, and apple cores, and 
turnip and carrot scraps, and such things dear to the 
appetite of any normal mule, and while Jimmy Whis- 
kers contentedly munched these tidbits and stood by 
with drooping ears and drowsy eyes. Old Jimmy All- 
around took the children with him to another world, 
the world of the fairies where all is bright and cheery 
and where the drudgeries and miseries of human life 
may not intrude. Wondrous were the tales he told 
these fascinated listeners, and more wondrous were 
the "conjur" tricks performed before their very eyes, 
greatest of evidence that their old friend was truly 
in league with the "little people," and hence far more 
than mortal man. 

So the two Jimmies grew old and yet older to- 
gether, the human Jimmy caring for his humble 
partner and servant with pitiable, but beautiful, solic- 
itude. At last, not many nights ago, there came a 
storm of unusual severity, and the wind whistled 
through the cracks of the old shack and the cold 
rain beat down in torrents that neither roof nor wall 
could turn aside, and Old Jimmy Allaround, in dire 
distress lest Jimmy Whiskers might come to harm, 
arose from his bunk and tied around the body of his 
comrade, snug as could be, the only bit of bed- 
clothing that the pair possessed, a tattered quilt. 
Then down again he laid his own weazened, unpro- 
tected old body, and as he dodged the invading ele- 
ments as best he might his heart grew warm at the 
thought of Jimmy Whiskers, snug and sheltered, 
while the cold crept deeper and deeper into the very 
marrow of his own bones and the storm grew fiercer 
and fiercer. 

Many hours afterward, when the storm had passed 
and the sun had come to brighten the world again, 
came some children to see how their old friends had 
weathered the gale. There in the room they found 
Jimmy Whiskers, so hungry that he had gnawed the 
backs of a couple of rickety chairs, but still alive and 
with the comfort still wrapped securely about him — 



but the spirit of Old Jimmy Allaround had flown; and 
because the latter was beyond the reach of human 
ministrations, they took Jimmy Whiskers and treated 
him to a banquet such as he had seldom known. 

Somehow, I don't like to say to myself that Old 
Jimmy Allaround died of cold and exposure. Heaven 
and holl and God don't play very big parts in the 
horse business, I know, but there must be a God, 
and there may be a hell, and there has to be a 
heaven, or else what would become of the sweet 
spirits of all the myriad mothers of men? It seems 
to me that the Lord and the major angels must have 
been looking down at the world as it turned below 
them that stormy night, and when the war-rent por- 
tion passed before them their faces must have been 
sad and worn; perhaps they brightened when peace- 
ful America came beneath their eyes, though they 
must have regretted the wild scramble that so many 
of us are making to get rich at the expense of the 
other side of the world; I like to think that when 
Old Jimmy AUaround's shack came into view the 
worn looks passed away entirely, and only love and 
compassion shone out. It seems to me that they 
must all have smiled and conferred for a moment in 
lowered, loving tones, and then the Lord must just 
have reached down a kindly hand and beckoned for 
Old Jimmy Allaround to come up with him — and 
Jimmy, without pain or suffering or travail of body 
or spirit just answered the call and went "home." 
That's the way I like to think of it — don't you? 

o — — 

EXCELLENT OUTLOOK FOR DRAFT HORSES. 



There is no keener student of the draft horse situa- 
tion in the United States than Secretary Wayne 
Dinsniore of the Percheron Society of America, and 
trade reviews emanating from that office over his 
signature may safely be accorded the greatest con- 
sideration and respect, as they invariably prove to 
be plain statements of fact based upon authentic 
information of a very comprehensive nature. In view 
of the approaching second annual sale of the Califor- 
nia Draft Horse Breeders' Association, to be held 
on Wednesday, February second, at the University 
Farm at Davis, we were just preparing a little sketch 
of what the future holds in store for the producer 
of horses of this class when a letter from Mr. Dins- 
more came to hand, containing a review of the situa- 
tion and some of the "whys" of the draft horse busi- 
ness; the whole matter is so much to the point that 
we take a great deal of pleasure in reproducing the 
same herewith, with thanks to the writer. Before 
beginning the perusal of Mr. Dinsmore's welcome 
contribution, allow us to remind you of the benefits 
accruing to California draft horse breeders from the 
extensive patronage of this sale, of which E. W. 
Westgate, Rio Vista, is the secretary, the same hav- 
ing been emphasized in previous notes on this page. 
Make your entries early, in order to allow proper 
time for advertising and cataloging, and then see 
that your stuff goes to the sale ring in the pink of 
condition. Now for Mr. Dinsmore's summing up of 
the situation: 



1916 ushers jn what- promises to be one of the 
most favorable seasons horse breeders have ever 
faced. Draft horse producers have especial reason 
to feel optimistic. The marked improvement in the 
industrial world has brought transportation facilities 
again into active service and all transportation 
agencies, — railroads, motors, and teams, — are being 
used more freely than for two years past. Draft 
geldings have been in good demand at higher prices, 
and the farm demand for useful draft mares is 
already so strong that horse dealers are being elim- 
inated as buyers of good draft mares. 

Pure bred draft horses are also in keen demand. 
The elimination of imports since August 1914 have 
resulted in a marked stimulus to horse breeding in 
this country, and more satisfactory prices have been 
paid to the breeders and raisers of good American 
bred draft colts than at any time in our past history. 

The total number of horses on famis, April 1st, 
1910, was 19,83:5,113 head, and the Government esti- 
mates for Jan. 1st, 191.'), credited this country with 
21,195,000 head— an increase of 6M% over 1910. 

The fifteen states on which we have definite data 
as to stallions in service arc Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, 
Nebraska, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North and South 
Dakota, Michigan, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Cali- 
fornia, Washington, Oregon and Montana. These 
states had, January 1st, 1915, a total of approxi- 
mately 11,085,352 horses, assuming the same rate of 
increase for these states as for the United States as 
a whole. They also had, according to the latest 
available Stallion Board reports, 47,697 stallions, all 
told, in service, 23,671 of which were pure bred 
draft stallions. 

If this proportion holds good throughout the United 
States, It would give us a total of 91,357 stallions In 



service, approximately half of which could be clas.sed 
as pure bred draft(>rs. As a matter of fact, however, 
the number is probably somewhat loss, as all the 
imporlant liors(> producing states, except Indiana, 
Ohio and Texas, are included in our figures and the 
proportion of stallions in use in other states is 
unquestionably lower, as less attention is given there 
to hor.se production. Assuming, for the sake of argu- 
ment, that these percentages hold good, however, we 
have- about 40,000 pure bred draft stallions and ap- 
proximately the same number of stallions of other 
kinds, most of which are grades and mongrels. Any 
well informed horse breeder will admit that at least 
ten per cent of the stallions in service are annually 
being retired because of age, death, unsoundness, or 
other cause, and it therefore follows that about 
8.000 stallions are annually being retired from the 
breeding ranks. To make good on wastage alone, 
therefore, we must replace 4. .000 pure bred draft 
stallions annually, and as the other stallions, grade 
and otherwise, should for the most part be replaced 
by pure bred draft sires, we actually need around 
seven thousand good draft sires annually to fill the 
places of horses dropping out of service. 

During the fiscal years of the various draft horse 
record associations ending in 1915, approximately 
12,000 American bred draft horses were recorded. 
This includes both sexes and all ages of Percherons, 
Clydesdales, Belgians. Shires, French Draft and Suf- 
folks. Less than half of these were stallions, so that 
we are producing annually now less than G.OOO draft 
stallions. It is recognized by all horsemen that at 
least one-fifth of the stallions that are recorded are 
not good enough to be of any real service in improv- 
ing the draft horse stock of the country. It there- 
fore follows that we are really producing less than 
five thousand good pure bred draft sires annually, 
when we need at least 7,000 per year, at the lowest 
calculation. 

Aside from the foregoing considerations, there are 
other factors which aUKur well for the draft horse 
industry. High priced land and labor have led our 
farmers to study methods of reducing costs in farm 
work. The advantages draft horses have over light 
horses in farm work are numerous. The tractive 
power horses can exert is governed by weight, 
strength and temperament. Under extraordinary 
pressure horses can exert from four to six horse 
power, but under conditions of daily work exert a 
pull which is about one-tenth of their working weight. 
The horse power traction required to move farm im- 
plements depends on the soil, climatic conditions, 
and the condition of implements used. Under favor- 
able conditions five draft horses weighing 1600 
pounds or over will pull a two plow gang of 14 inch 
plows a little more than twenty miles, averaging 
from five to five and a half acres per day. It will 
take seven horses that weigh from 1100 to 1300 
pounds to do the same work, and it is not practicable 
to work seven horses on one .gang plow with the 
ordinar>- class of farm labor. It will therefore re- 
quire two men on single plows, one with four and 
the other with three light horses, to do the same 
amount of work that one man will do with five draft 
horses. The same general ruling applies in seeding, 
discing and harvestin.g, for while one man can read- 
ily handle five draft horses on the implements 
needed, he cannot advantageously nor safely use 
enough more light horses to give his equivalent 
power. The use of draft horses therefore increases 
the amount of work one man can do in the field: 
and in actual practice the work is better done when 
drafters are used. When to this we add the fact 
that less barn room is needed, and less labor re- 
quired in handling the heavy horses, than is neces- 
sary where enough more light hor.ses are used to 
make up equivalent power, the advantage becomes 
marked. 

Besides this, the heavy horses sell more readily 
and at higher prices, when surplus is to be sold. 
Light weight horses have been bought at prices 
ranging froni $110 to $150, while draft horses have 
brought from $200 to $300 each. This is an impor- 
tant factor, for every well managed farm has a few 
surplus horses to sell annually, and the readier the 
sale, and higher prices realized for draft stock, are 
factors which must appeal strongly to all thinking 
farmers. Maximum cash returns are what we are all 
interested in. and this we obtain from drafters used 
In farm work. 

These are facts which thinking farmers will pon- 
der well. Horse buyers have scoured the United 
States as never before. More than half a million 
horses and over one hundred thousand mules have 
gone for war purposes. Demands from abroad will 
continue as long as the war lasts, and will bo strong 
for years afterward, for the battling nations must 
call on us for horses for industrial purposes. Country 
sales already reflect the feeling of conservative 
farmers, who are reported good buyers at strong 
prices, on first class mares weighing 1600 pounds or 
over, whether grade or pure bred. 

The recent cable from President Aveline, Per- 
cheron Society of France, that the Government there 
has agreed to allow the exportation of two hundred 
stallions, foaled in 1912 or earlier, only serves to 
emphasize the extent to which war has curtailed 
supplies abroad. 

Good blood and liberal feeding will pay better In 
draft horses than in any other class of stock, always 
providing that a man buys no more mares than he 
needs in his farm operations, and ex(?rcises good 
management — essential to success In anv line. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 22, 1916. 



A Visit with the Los Angeles Horsemen 

CONTINI EI) FROM LAST WEEK 



Last week we took the readers of the Breeder and 
Sportsman with us and paid a visit to the stables of 
a number of the trainers who are wintering at Expo- 
sition Park at Los Angeles, but night and the limita- 
tions of space overtook us before we had much more 
than gotten half way around the place, so we will 
start in again this morning and see If we can "do" 
the balance of the sights. 

« * * • 

J. W. Cooper, who handled the Borden horses up 
in the San Francisco neighborhood a few seasons 
ago, is stabled in the barn next to the grandstand, 
handling mostly matinee horses belonging to local 
drivers and breaking some youngsters for L. J. 
Christopher. The four-year-old bay mare Caroline 
Holt, owned by Frank Orr, has been worked only 
about six weeks but she has a nice way of trotting 
and looks like a good prospect, having learned even 
in this short time to trot in 2:35 with quarters in :36. 
She is by Beime Holt 2:lli,4, the son of Cochato 
that Fred Ward developed and sold to good advan- 
tage a few years back, and her dam is a daughter of 
McKinney. W. L. Thomas has a pretty nifty matinee 
pacer in the Cooper Stable, the black horse Zomack 
by Zolock out of a Zombro mare. He is a husky, 
rugged fellow and has a fun record of 2:16, while he 
has turned quarters at the 1:56 gait. 

Reminiscent of the short grass country is the pedi- 
gree of the big fellow that heads the Christopher 
stable — the black gelding Alaca by Symboleer 2:09*^, 
out of a mare by Young Joe 2:18. As might be gath- 
ered from the tone of his pedigree, Alaca is a side- 
wheeler and has a matinee mark of the 2:10 variety, 
while last season he worked the Los Angeles track in 
2:08V4 with quarters in thirty seconds. Cooper has 
just recently taken him up again and he is in nice 
shape to get ready for another whirl with the boys. 
Before being gelded, Alaca was bred to a few mares, 
and two of the Christopher youngsters are by him, 
from mares by Redlac and Direcho respectively, 
while the third of the trio of two-year-olds that 
Cooper is just starting to break is a filly by Carlokin 
out of a James Madison dam. 

* * * * 

L. G. ("Lou") Baker, the former Blinois trainer 
who has made liis home in California for the last year 
or so, has the south end of the stable along with Mr. 
Cooper and has his horses nicely quartered in freshly 
whitewashed stalls, with half screened doors and 
other similar little "kinks" that add to the attrac- 
tiveness and serviceableness of a stable. At the time 
of my visit Lou had but one aged horse in the bam, 
the good trotter F. S. Whitney 2:09% (by F. S. Tur- 
ner 2:24 and out of the great brood mare By Guy by 
Guy Wilkes 2: 15 14), the lad that raced so well two 
years ago for Will Durfee. He is still owned by 
Sutherland and McKenzie of Orosi, and while not 
raced last season owing to the scarcity of fairs and 
meetings locally, he will be prepped for another cam- 
paign this year. He is taking his light work very 
nicely, and has made a very attractive horse. Two 
two-year-olds arc getting their early lessons at 
Baker's hands, a trotting colt by Junior Dan Patch 
2:051/^, dam by Moses S. 2:19i/i, that is up to a three- 
minute gait at present, and a black pacing colt by 
Six Bells, dam by Zolock and grandam by Nutwood, 
that has had very little done with him but paced an 
eighth in eighteen seconds when but two weeks off 
pasture. 

W. A. McKibben has a very promising baby pacer 
that Baker expects to begin handling in the near 
future, the two-year-old black filly Leta Patch by 
Junior Dan Patch out of Baby Wilkes by Roy Wilkes, 
and a couple of older mares have probably been 
added to the stable since my visit, as Lou was 
expecting them at any time. One is the mare Maggie 
N., that trotted last season for W. R. Murphy in 
2:1314, with halves in 1:05%, owned by C. H. Mor- 
gan, at present one of the city officials of Los Ange- 
les, and the other is a flve-year-old with less educa- 
tion, owned by the Los Angeles lumberman, Schepp. 
Both are daughters of W. G. Durfee's great son of 
McKinney, Carlokin 2:07V^, Maggie N. being out of 
the dam of Bystander 2: 07 14 while the Schepp mare 
is out of Lady Vasto (dam of Carsto (2) 2:22i^) by 
Vasto. She was not trained last season but was 
handled a bit as a three-year-old and developed to 
a mile in 2:40. 



Last season Lou developed what he believes to be 
one of the best green trotters in the west, the flve- 
year-old stallion Zomrect by Zombro 2:11, out of 
Lilly S. trial 2:16 (dam of King Lilly Pointer 2:14, 
etc.) by Direct 2:05'A, grandam Lilly Stanley 2:17% 
by Whippleton. This fellow ran out in the hills with 
a number of other horses of both sexes and various 
breeds until last January, when Baker, then located 
at Riverside, took him up and broke him. He was a 
full five-year-old and had had absolutely nothing done 
with him, but in Baker's hands soon began to show 
indications of a desire to keep from trampling on his 
pedigree and to regulate his performances in accord 
with his blood lines. In March Lou drove him his 
first mile in three minutes, followed in the middle of 
June by his first one in 2:20. A little later on Baker 
moved to the mile track at Exposition Park, bringing 
the horse with him, and at the breeders' meeting 
there on October 19 gave him a time record of 2:12^4. 
The weather remained favorable for going ahead with 
the big fellow, and on November 5 he drove him in 
2:10% before letting up on him for the winter. Lou 
sent him home sound and in the best of shape, and 
he is now taking things easy at the establishment 
of his owner, J. J. Fitzgerald of Covina. He looks 
like a most excellent prospect for the coming season, 
and Mr. Fitzgerald will doubtless have him trained 
and raced, perhaps by Baker. 

Lou is a sample of the bred in the bone horse lover 
who cannot stay away from the trotters. Back in the 
central west he raced those good halfmile track cam- 
paigners. Pert 2:10 and Marian 2: 16 14, among others, 
and was for a time at the International 1:55 Farm 
of M. W. Savage, during the period that Ned McCarr 
was the major domo of that establishment. Some 
years ago he quit the trotters for a nice easy "inside" 
berth as assistant cashier of a suburban bank near 
Milwaukee, but the confinement was too much for 
his health and the trotters "kept a-callin'," so back 
to the trotters he came, with the results that he has 
regained his health and has no cause to regret his 
return. 

* * * » 

Charley Parker, with Park Kelley as his right hand 
man, has only a pair of horses up at present, both 
trotters and both in nice shape. Alta Mac by Redlac 
2:07%, who annexed a record of 2:19% some time 
ago, has not been worked much of late but will be 
gotten ready for 1916, while the other member of the 
pair has just been let down. This is an eight-year- 
old bay mare by Limonero 2:15% out of Sona 2:16 
by McKinney 2:11^4 and under the name of Cima 
was driven to a record of 2:22 by Park at the recent 
breeders' meeting of the Los Angeles Harness Horse 
Association. She is a nicely made mare and as she 
has fully matured without being knocked out by hard 
work she may make a fair sort to race this season. 
Anyway, Charley will probably give both of them a 
chance to show what they can do later on. 

* * * * 

N. G. Boyd of Long Beach bought a mare some 
years ago under circumstances that had a rather odd 
twist to them, the seller of the lady in question 
refusing, for reasons of his own, to furnish a pedigree 
with her but assuring Mr. Boyd that she was as well 
bred as the next one, and while the buyer never did 
succeed in finding out the true breeding he did con- 
vince himself that she was a well bred mare. He 
mated her with good stallions and the way the off- 
spring have shown him speed is his guarantee that 
the vendor was not lying to him, as they all have had 
natural inclinations to make speed. Down at his 
home at Long Beach Mr. Boyd has two mares out of 
her, one by Zolock and the other by Zombro, that are 
both possessed of many excellent qualities, and at 
Exposition Park he has a pair of her produce in 
training that have shown their trotting inclinations 
very plainly. One is a three-year-old brown colt 
called Ben Beach, and as a two-year-old he negotiated 
the local course in 2:26%, with halves in 1:11% and 
shorter fractional parts of the route at a still brisker 
gait. He is a nice tempered lad with a good head 
and an honest way of acting at all times, a son of 
J. H. Torrey's speed sire Baronteer Todd 2:09^/4. The 
other member of the old mare's family is the black 
mare June Bug, now seven years old and a well 
developed trotter. She is a daughter of Zombro, 
which is self-evident explanation as to the source of 



a certain portion of her trotting inclinations, and has 
worked the Los Angeles track in 2:12%, with halves 
in 1:04%, quarters in :31% and eighths in :14%. She 
can go the route and repeat, too, judging from a 
recent workout, as one day during the month of 
December, just passed, Mr. Boyd gave her five heats 
better than 2:16, four of them below 2:14, which is 
speed and stamina of an amount sufficient to win 
quite a bit of money in certain parts of the country. 

* * * * 

Henry Peterson has only three head in his stable 
at present, but as one of them is a season champion 
for 1915 and the other two are by the same sire out 
of good mares, "he should worry." Bon Courage, who 
was the boss two-year-old trotting gelding of 1913 
and the best four-year-old gelding of that gait last 
season, has put on a little flesh since coming home 
from the exposition and looks very flt to prepare for 
a campaign this season. Last year he was not taken 
in hand until fairly late but made speed very nicely 
toward the end of the season and was driven to his 
record by his old trainer and driver, the late Ted 
Hayes. Here at the exposition everything in the 
world was against a trotter of his likes and dislikes 
making any sort of a showing, but he drew down 
several hundred dollars at that. He was a light made 
sort as a colt and has not yet matured into a really 
"husky" fellow, but he had a lot of lick and always 
had the strength to carry it. He is the kind that a 
bit of age should benefit greatly, and his most 
useful season still lies before him, in the writer's 
estimation. Bon Bell, a year older than the champ, 
is a brown gelding by Bon McKinney and out of a 
mighty good mare. School Bell 2:16*4 by Prodigal, 
School Bell being the dam of Charley McCarty's trot- 
ting stallion George Hammett (3) 2: ■'514, that trotted 
the I'leasanton track later in life in 2:0SV^, or there- 
abouts. Contrary to what might at flrst glance be 
expected, Bon Bell is a pacer and apparently the 
making of a pretty handy one, as he trialed for Henry 
as a four-year-old in 2:13. The third of the Bon 
McKinneys is a snappy scamp of a yearling belonging 
to Dr. Dodge. He has not been weaned many weeks 
and is just beginning to get somewhere near bridle 
wise, but has reeled off an eighth in twenty-seven 
seconds at the trot. 

* * * * 

Railey Macey, with about the same bunch of good 
boys that he brought to the country with him when 
he came out from Minneapolis last spring, has the 
ten head composing the International 1:55 Stable in 
excellent condition, the greater portion of them 
carrying faster records than those appearing with 
their names at the time they left home. The Savage 
stable has had hard luck in great gobs come its way 
here in California, but no kick has been made by 
either owner or trainer, as bum luck is all part of 
the game, to be taken by good sportsmen as it comes. 
There is an old saying to the effect that the higher 
the hills are the deeper the valleys will be, so when 
they once more begin getting a fair break on this 
luck business, the Savage horses will more than 
make up for this off season. At that, with all the 
things they had to buck, the stable might have fared 
far worse, and as the horses and the men connected 
with them have made a host of western friends for 
Dan Patch and the International establishment in 
general, the journey lacks a whole lot of having been 
made in vain. 

Dazzle Patch 2:09%, the horse that Ned McCarr 
always claimed was endowed with all the natural 
inclinations that make a successful clown or contor- 
tionist, has had practically nothing but very light 
jogging ever since the vets announced last spring that 
a year's let-up was necessary to get him into shape 
to train again. No fresh filled jug was ever fuller 
of vinegar than this fellow, and in a stall or paddock 
he is always trying some new stunt, being so ever- 
lastingly at it that a padded stall is the only thing 
in which he can be kept with safety. He goes through 
so many different kinds of acrobatics that it has 
always been a question as to whether his front fin 
was injured on the track or in the stall. Sure it is 
that by nature he is one of the fastest horses ever 
foaled, and every effort is being made to get him in 
shape to send for one good record, even if he never 
stands racing. His record is only 2:09%, but authen- 
tic trials in 2:02% and one halfmile fiight in :56% 
give a pretty fair idea of what is to be expected of 
him at any time that he gets to the point where 
Macey says he will do to turn for the word. 

Electric Patch (3) 2:09i4 that made such a nice 
campaign for Macey in the three-year-old classes 
down in the central west in 1914 and who, save for 



Saturday, January 22, 1916] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



b 



the accident that spilled his driver in the big stake 
at the fall meeting at the exposition, would certainly 
have claimed a part of the big twenty thousand dol- 
lar purse, is wintering in excellent shape and should 
make a good trotter in his class this season. After 
Macey was turned out of the sulky at San Francisco 
the horse trotted on without a break, with one line 
wrapped in a wheel and locking it, so that he was 
not only trotting with a strong pull on one side of 
his mouth but also dragging the bike — pretty good 
evidence of real race horse quality. After that he 
came on and was barely behind the cash division in 
both the following heats, while later in the meeting 
he trotted a nice race with Peter Scott, Albaloma 
and Virginia Barnette, finishing ahead of the star of 
the Durfee stable in two out of the three heats. He 
is a horse of a good deal of front action at the trot, 
and as he is one of the oiliest gaited pacers imagin- 
able when shod for that way of going there has been 
some talk of allowing him to turn over to the pace, 
but not for the present. He worked the Los Angeles 
track last summer in 2:06%. 

The trip to California resulted, among other things, 
in the development of the fastest member of the Dan 
Patch family to this date, the husky bay pacer 
Power Patch 2:03i^ who came out with a record of 
only 2:09V4. Power has the advantage of the other 
fast members of the tribe by a matter of nearly two 
seconds, and Macey is very optimistic over the pros- 
pect for his making a high class race horse, as he 
has all the natural qualifications that go with "class" 
in a campaigner. His dam, Effie Powers 2:08V4, was 
one of the gamest mares ever raced in this country, 
and this one of her sons is a big sturdy fellow, good 
headed and sound and right now a good age for hard 
usage, this being his sixth year. Princess Patch 
2:06% is one of the band that failed to take kindly 
to the change to California for some reason, and 
hardly developed as much whizz here as she has 
previously had back in the central west. She is 
doing very well, however, and Railey thinks she will 
be pretty useful where he is going this season, as 
she will be eligible to about the 2:13 class. 

Jean Arion 2:08%, who is the especial favorite of 
Harold Savage and who trotted second to Maymack 
in the amateur free-for-all at the spring meeting for 
that clever young teamster, was doing so nicely late 
in the summer that Macey expected to lower the 
Arion family record with her, and just as she was 
about ready for the trip against the watch the season 
jinx overtook her and she had to be let up on. 
Whether or not she will be raced this season I am 
not aware, but she will be bred this spring to Electric 
Patch, and should make a brood mare of renown. 
Mary E. Patch, the other trotting mare of the stable, 
cut her record from 2:17yi to 2:12% at the record 
meeting in October, and it is probable that she too 
will join the brood mare ranks, it being the present 
intention to send her to the Blue Grass to be mated 
with J. Malcolm Forbes 2:08, the son of Bingen whose 
youngsters have made such rapid strides into the 



limelight in the past season. 

Buzz Patch, who reached out and grabbed a nice 
new record of 2:09i^ for herself some weeks ago, is 
getting over the extreme nervousness that used to 
be her greatest fault, and has quieted down to such 
an extent that the goat who has previously kept her 
stable company is being "weaned away from her" 
gradually, and Buzz doesn't seem to mind. Drift 
Patch and Agnes Patch, both three-year-olds in 1915, 
now adorn the 2:10 list, the former in flat figures 
and the filly in time half a second faster, and are a 
nice pair for their age. Agnes won the three-year- 
old pace at the spring meeting at the exposition 
very handily and her subsequent performance shows 
that she has the speed of that field by several sec- 
onds. The last member of the string, the two-year- 
old filly Judith Patch, now three, of course, has 
always been my personal favorite of the stable for 
some reason, and I was pleased to learn that she 
suffered no lasting ailment as the result of the nail 
she picked up in her race at the exposition, where 
she took her first record of 2:25, a mark that she has 
since reduced to 2:21V\- Nothing but running that 
spike into her foot prevented her from getting a 
win race record in her very first start, and if 
she gets any sort of an even break in the future I 
believe that she will make a very high class mare. 
She is a perfect little lady in harness or out and is 
making a very nice growth, and if there is anything 
in breeding, individuality and natural inclinations she 
ought to do. She is the first performer to the credit 
of Dazzle Patch 2:09% and her dam is the fastest 
daughter of the great pacing sire, Hal B. — Hal Raven 
2:03%. 

Macey and his boys have caught the gardening 
fever from the Durfee outfit and at the time of my 
visit were getting things well under way to add 
to the attractiveness of their surroundings by the 
growing of a big bank of sweet peas and other flow- 
ers, a course that might well be foUewed by every 
stable at the park. Just where he will race has not 
been decided, but it will probably be down the Great 
Western Circuit and at the major western fairs, that 
being the farm's favorite route. Mr. Savage is ex- 
pected to pay Los Angeles a visit along in March, 
and definite plans for the campaign will probably 
be made at that time. 

* * * * 

While all the Los Angeles colony find plenty to 
keep their time well occupied, the gentleman who 
puts up the one original and lifelike imitation of the 
busy little bee is none other than our old friend 
William George Durfee — that, is, when he works. 
Ever since the Pleasanton futurities were raced, 
Henry Atkinson has had a hard job keeping cases 
on the boss and getting much work out of him, for 
at the season's close Will declared himself for a rest, 
which most people who know him will concede that 
he had coming to him. The inclement weather that 
has graced Southern California ever since he and 
Mrs. Durfee retilrned home just before Christmas has 



prolonged the vacation, as speed making has been 
out of the question, and Will has confined his activi- 
ties largely to petting things shaped up for the busy 
time that is coming when the weather settles, while 
the big stable of horses take their daily exercise 
at the hands of the capable men that Will always 
keeps around him. Including the new crop of year- 
lings there are over forty head of trotters and pacers 
now stabled in the Durfee stalls, ranging from the 
embryonic youngsters to the finipli(>d product, while 
the brood mares and stallions under shelter bring 
the total number close to the fifty mark or perhaps 
a trifle in excess of it. 

While there is a story that goes with practically 
every horse in the barn, interest right at this mo- 
ment centers in the little band that will in all prob- 
ability compose the string that will go across the 
mountains this summer to try conclusions with the 
pick of the land on the Grand Circuit, a section of 
the land that the Durfee horses have not invaded 
since 1912. Some weeks ago Will announced his 
intention of making the trip with at least half a dozen 
of the speediest of his big stable, the six individuals 
meant being the trotters Virginia Barnette (3) 
2:08i/i, Esperanza (3) 2:09 and The Lark (4) 2:09i4, 
and the pacers Clara Mac 2:04%, White Sox 2:05Vt 
and Contention B. (3) 2:10, the latter's Phoenix rec- 
ord of 2:08^4 being lost to him on a technicality. 
There may be some others to make the trip, but if 
this half dozen meet with no accident and keep com- 
ing as they should they are almost sure to make the 
journey. 

Virginia Barnette, who enjoys the distinction of 
having been one of the very few trotters that won 
heats from the redoubtable Peter Scott during the 
season of 1915, is carrying more flesh than I ever 
saw on her frame before and is the picture of health, 
while her spirits if anything are just a trifle too high 
for comfort. If I owned this girl I would certainly 
try to learn horse language long enough to have a 
heart to heart talk with her in an effort to persuade 
her to resign her membership in the Exposition Park 
Suicide Club, if not for good and all at least until 
after her racing career is over. Last spring she ran 
away for miles over the paved streets, finally landing 
in an open sewer from which she was extricated 
through the combined efforts of some six or eight 
men, and then, after an enforced letup, came on and 
made a very creditable campaign. On the last day 
of my visit this trip she again tried the suicide route 
by running full tilt the length of her paddock, falling 
when she tried to turn and going clean through the 
fence. Aside from a few patches of hide knocked 
off in the scramble she seemed none the worse for 
the escapade, but it must be rather hard on the 
nerves of the owner to have a lass of her value in- 
dulging so regularly in tantrums of this kind. She 
is a bundle of nerve and muscle, with a head chock 
full of race, and as she is of the frail type that 
should improve greatly with a bit of maturity I look 
for her to be a contender in the hottest kind of com- 



Entries to State Fair Futurity Number Eight, Foals of 1916 



Never before in the history of colt stakes in California has so poor a patron- 
age been accorded any event as that which fell to the lot of the State F'air 
Futurity Number Eight, entries to which clo.sed on January first, nominations 
to the same appearing herewith. The scant entry list is most eloquent testi- 
mony to the condition of affairs in light harness circles in California at this 
moment, and the closing of the event meant facing a certain loss; however, 
at the recent meeting of the directors of the California State Agricultural 
Society it was the concensus of opinion that everything possible should be done 
by them to promote and safeguard the; interests of harness horse breeders 
through this period of depression, confident that they will be more than repaid 
in the future for any losses incurred pending the improvement of conditions 
in this grear industry. Every patron of the stake owes his thanks to the direc- 
tors for this course, and every colt should be kept in to the moment that it 
proves its unfitness for early racing. Through the courtesy of Secretary C. W. 
Paine we present the following complete list of nominations: 

OWNKR. MAItE. STALLION HUKD TO. 

J. N. Anderson Delia Derby by Cha.s. Derby McDillon 

I. L. Rorden Cold Lily by Copa de Oro Kxpre.s.sive Mac 

I. L. Borden Cleopatni by Zolock Barney Barnato 

S. Chri.stenson Rlla J. T. by Bob Mason Tni.- Kinney 

I. J. Cornett Salina.s I'rince.s.s by Eugeneer McDillon 

I. J. Cornett Malvina by Oh So Vernon McKlnncy 

S. H. Cowell Hulda C. by Dexter Prince Panama 

S. H. Cowell Dione II by Cupid Peter MnKlyo 

Chas. DeRyder riracie Pointer by Star Pointer Vernon McKinney 

Chas. DeRyder Arawanna B. by Sidney Dillon Vernon McKinney 

Jas. F. Dunne Letter B. Jr. by Benton Boy Mahomet Watl.s 

W. G. Durfee My Irene S. by Petlgru Carlokin 

W. G. Durfee Atherine by I'atron Carlokin 

W. G. Durfee Honey Healey by Zombro Carlokin 

W. G. Durfee Zephyr by Zombro Carlokin 

W. G. Durfee Iran Belle by Iran Alto Carlokin 

W. G. Durfee De Ora by Copa di; Oro Carlokin 

W. G. Durfee Kzelda by Del Coronado Carlokin 

W. G. Durfee Subilo by Steinway Copa de Ore 

W. G. Durfee Pavlowa B. by Petiwru Copa de Oro 

W. G. Durfee Rita H. by McKinney Copa de Oro 



W. n. Durfee l,eonor McKay by McKinney Copa dc Oro 

W. f;. Durfee Truly Ansel Ijy Prince Ansel Copa de Ore 

W. M. Fergu.son by Jay Bird Alton 

.Sam Flirui Oictii tii.s Maid by Dictatus Healanl 

L. L. Gilpin Maud Jay C. by Nearest PaolLs 

Ah'X. Grant Sonu by McKinney Copa dc Oro 

W. S. Harkey Deviletta by ni;iblo Robert BinKcn 

C. A. Harrison Lottie Whippleton by San Diego Robert Blnten 

C. A. Harrison by Director True Kiiuiey 

H. H. Helman I>ady Mowry by McKinney McDillon 

Heinet Stock Farm.../,eta \\", by Nutwood Wilkes \\'ilbur Lou 

S. II. Mitchell Air.ino by Nazole AI de Baron 

J. K. MoiitKomery Margaret M. by Chestnut Tom Jim Logan 

n. J. M.-icKenzie Martha Spy by Th<! Spy Mahomet Wafta 

H. J. MacKcnzie Merry W idow by Red Pnc J"e Patc'hen II 

R. J. MacKenzie by Carlokin Joe Patchen II 

R. J. MacKenzie Kugenia B. by Zombro Rapallo 

R. J. MacKenzie Baroness Psyche by Baron Review Quintell 

R. J. MacKenzie Mildred Togo by Togo Mahomet Watts 

R. J. MacKenzie Zombro Belle by Zombro Mahomet Watts 

Frank Malcolm Fresno Girl bv Siymour Wilkes Mahomet Watts 

J. W Marshall Ramona bv Denionio Bni lyogan 

J. W. Marshall I'.nlly Pointer by Star Pointer Hm Logan 

Roy D. Mayes Beriiice Marshall by Denionio JIni I>igan 

Chas. W. Paine Sweet Rdina by Zombro Peter McKlyo 

F. J. Ruhstaller Fxijcdio by Lljero Moko Hall 

B. F. Rush I-rfi Mr)Scovila by r;uy Wilkes Bodaker 

B. F. Rush..] Potrero I.,ass by Demonio Bon McKinney 

b! f! Rush..!..! Memonio by Demonio Bon McKliuiey 

B F Rush Potrero f',irl by Prince Alrlle Demonio 

Geo F Ryan! Miss Harris by Sidney Dillon Vernon McKinney 

J H .Short Honrla Girl bv Rubino Skidoo Wilkes 

J. F. Short Rubber Girl by Skidoo Wilkes Wild Nulling 

C F .Silva Camille by Stam B Teddy Bear 

Mrs Jas. Stewart Faster I), by Diablo Copa de Oro 

L H Todhunter Li>avlnetle by Zombro Peter McKIyo 

Valencia Stock Farm.Ro.ie Girl by Amado Pegasus 

D. W. Wallls Mary W. by Dictatus Bondhf)lder 

G. Wempe Plumado by Advertiser Peter McKlyo 

M. L. Woy Loma B, by Stam B Stanford McKinney 

m! L. Woy Strathalie by Strathway Expressive Mac 

M. L.. Woy Florence B. by Bon Voyage Expressive Mac 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 22, 1916. 



pany. One of her knees filled a bit after coming 
home from the exposition but the ailment was purely 
temporary and yielded readily to treatment, so that 
she goes into her five-year-old form sound as ever 
and much huskier. 

Esperanza and The Lark are also five-year-olds, and 
while the daughter of Carlokin and My Irene S. was 
something of a disappointment to her friends last 
season Durfee has full confidence in her and says 
to tag her for along about 2:05 this year. Last spring 
she took a decided dislike to the exposition track 
and never got to a point where she fancied it any 
too well, though performing much better at the fall 
meeting. Like Virginia, she starts her season's 
training in the very best of condition, and Mr. Durfee 
is pretty apt to know what he is talking about when 
he figures her as a 2:05 performer. The Lark, also 
by Carlokin and out of the dam of White Sox, Is 
the handsomest individual of the three, and while 
she has a well developed turn of speed she has had 
very little racing and is eligible to the slow classes. 
Her four-year-old mark of 2:09V^ is a breeder's record 
only, though she has a non-winning performance race 
record of 2:12Vt made last fall at Phoenix, where she 
went a couple of very nice races, driven once by 
Mr. Durfee and once by the stable's second trainer, 
Henry Atkinson. 

Among the wigglers that are included in the first 
Grand Circuit plans the mainstay of the stable is 
White Sox 2: 05 ',4, whose performances of the past 
season are too fresh in the minds of coast horsemen 
to need reviewing at this moment. The daughter of 
Del Coronado and Subito was let down right after the 
Arizona State Fair, where she won both her starts, 
pacing each mile sf the last race in the same notch, 
2:051/4, and at the time of my visit had not had the 
harness on her for some weeks, taking her daily exer- 
cise in a roomy paddock. Always a good doer, phys- 
ically, she looks more rugged than ever and is clean 
and hard in leg and muscle. The proposed match 
between Sox and Hal Boy is arousing a good deal 
of interest and causing considerable comment, and 
while the preponderance of opinion favors the pony 
pacer, I for one cannot see that the Boy is going 
to have things all his way by a good deal, providing 
both stay sound and go to the post really fit for a 
race. Both Sox and the Boy are the kind that im- 
prove with a bit of racing, and I have it in my head 
that Sox is going to be a much better mare this year 
than ever before. Given the proposed match under 
equitable conditions of fitness on the part of each 
horse, date it well down the line at about Syracuse 
or the second meeting at Columbus, or at Lexington, 
and there will be a horse race as is a horse race. 

Clara Mac, from the standpoint of physical condi- 
tion, looks better than I ever saw her before, but she 
has not done quite as well for Will along speed 
making lines as might be wished. She had a pretty 
hard deal just before he secured her and it took her 
some time to round into shape, and she has never 
flattened properly to her gait. The best mile she had 
after coming to the Durfee stable was along around 
2:04, and while this it not standing still by a good 
deal it was hardly as fast as her teamster expected to 
travel when he started on the journey. She im- 
proved for him along toward the close of the season, 
and by starting in on her pretty early Will believes 
he will get her squared away to a point where she 
will be formidable in the 2:06 classes, to which she 
is now eligible by time allowance. Once back at 
her old form she is a mare that should pace around 
2:03 at least, perhaps a bit better. 

Contention B., who rounds out the pacing brigade, 
has just turned the corner into his fifth year, and if 
he improves as he should he will be no slouch of a 
pacer for the moderate classes, his winrace record 
being 2:18%, I believe. Like the other members of 
the stable that were raced last season, he has added 
some very welcome "mahogany" to his young bones 
since his return, and begins to look like a horse. He 
was a light built colt and will never mature into any 
giant, but age should bring him a considerable 
amount of strength, which has always been his great- 
est need. He has about as much lick as any man's 
pacer, having unbelted quarters in the immediate 
neighborhood of twenty-eight seconds, but until late 
last season always had a good deal of trouble in 
maintaining a flight of extreme speed for the full 
route, though as a three-year-old I saw him pace a 
mile around 2:07% under circumstances that were 
anything but advantageous— and he was one tired 
little hombre when he got to the end of the route. 
He had a little trouble with a curb last spring, if I 
remember rightly, and his training was shortened a 



bit on that account, but he gained in strength and 
staying quality and at Phoenix late in the fall was 
separately timed in a race in 2:04%, evidence that 
he has progressed considerably. He is a good headed 
little fellow with a nice mouth and I believe that he 
is going to make a very useful pacer. 

* * * * 
How many horses did I say that this man Durfee 
had in the stable— somewhere in the neighborhood 
of forty or fifty? And I have paid my respects to 
a whole half dozen of them! The amount of space 
that I have^et aside for this portion of my visit to 
the Angelenos is already shot full of type, and there 
is a whole string of horses in the Durfee stable yet 
to be looked at, so I will quit for the moment while 
the quitting is good, leaving all the younger things — 
and a nice lot they are — for consideration in a fol- 
lowing issue. — [N.] 

o 

COMING TROTTING CONGRESSES. 



Hartford, Conn., January 6, 1916. 
A Biennial Meeting or Congress of Members will 
be held at the Murray Hill Hotel, New York, at noon, 
Wednesday, February 9. 1916, in accordance with 
Article VH, Sec. 1, of the By-Laws, N. T. A. 

W. H. GOCHER, Secretary. 



Chicago, ni., January 10, 1916. 
The Thirteenth Biennial Congress of The American 
Trotting Association will convene at the Auditorium 
Hotel, Chicago. Tuesday, February 15, 1916, at 12 
o'clock M., at provided by the By-Laws of The Amer- 
ican Trotting Association, for election of Directors 
and transaction of such business as may be properly 
presented. W. H. KNIGHT, Secretary. 
o 

NORTH PACIFIC MANAGERS TO MEET IN 
SEATTLE. 



The annual meeting of the members of the North 
Pacific Fair Association will be held on Thursday 
and Friday, February third and fourth, not only 
members but all parties directly interested in the 
welfare of northwestern fairs being cordially invited 
to attend. Secretary J. W. Pace, who maintains a 
permanent office in Seattle, is in charge of all ar- 
rangements for the affair and requests that all who 
expect to attend notify him in advance, that proper 
provision may be made for their entertainment and 
a place on the program provided for them in case 
they have any remarks to make upon topics of inter- 
est. Just as large an attendance as possible Is 
desired, and as many expressions of ideas as there 
are attendants. The northwestern fairs were suc- 
cessful to a marked degree last season, due in no 
small measure to the spirit of co-operation that exists 
between the various local associations, and the put- 
ting into effect of theories advanced and practical 
knowledge gained through the medium of the annual 
meeting of the general association. By all means 
attend the meeting next month if possible, and write 
to Mr. Pace at once expressing your intention of 
being among those present. 

o 

Andrew Robertson, one of the foremost horsemen 
of Australasia and with a considerable acquaintance 
with California horse breeders owing to previous 
visits and numerous purchases of the produce of 
their farms, spent some days in San Francisco and 
vicinity recently, en route to his home at Allendale 
Farm, Melbourne, after a trip to England in the inter- 
ests of Tye & Company, for whom he secured a 
draft of over a score of high class thoroughbreds at 
the English auctions. War conditions in the mother 
country have caused the offering of many horses for 
sale which in ordinary times would not be priced 
even for private treaty, and the Australian breeders, 
like many of our American horsemen, have taken 
advantage of the opportunity for adding desirable 
animals to their studs and racing stables. Mr. Rob- 
ertson speaks very highly indeed of the stallion 
Honeywood, imported by George Wingfleld for his 
Nevada Stock Farm, and has no hesitation in declar- 
ing the best horse in England at this moment to be 
Pommern. another son of Polymelus. Trotting horses 
taken to the antipodes through his agency have 
proven most satisfactory in every way, but the Allen- 
dale trainer contented himself this trip with the 
English thoroughbreds, making no purchases in this 
country. The horses were shipped direct from an 
English port, but Mr. Robertson found the return by 
this route more to his liking from the standpoint of 
both safety and comfort, sailing Tuesday on the So- 
noma, of the Sidney Short Line. His local visit was 
enjoyable both for himself and his California friends, 
who regret that he was not longer among them. 
❖ ^«> 

Ned McCarr, formerly chief speed maker at the 
International 1:55 Horse Farm and for the last season 
or so the right hand man in the stable of Thomas 
W. Murphy, the Poughkeepsie wizard, has gone to a 
still more pleasant berth as trainer for the stable of 
Pittsburg's millionaire matinee driver, J. D. Gallery. 
Murphy attributed a good deal of the preparedness 
of his stable throughout the season, and especially 
at the exposition meeting, to the capable work done 
by Ned. and the Pittsburg folks will find him a 
mighty handy man to have around. 



— — — .-.-.-^ 

i NOTES and NEWS 1 

! J 

• • 

Little Prince 2:04^4 changed hands recently at a 
consideration of two thousand dollars and will be 
seen exclusively in 1916 in the twice around free- 
for-alls. His new owners are Messrs. Haley & John- 
son, Madison, Wis. 

^ ^ ^ 

Rhythmell 2:04Vi,, who as a three-year-old was the 
principal contender in the famous Kentucky futurity 
won by Manrico (3) 2:07 'A and who afterwards added 
more laurels to her name by winning the Walnut 
Hall Cup in 1914, will be mated this season to Peter 
the Great. 

<$><S>'S> 

The Grand Circuit dates for the coming season 
have been arranged and provide for continuous rac- 
ing from July 17 to October 21. North Randall starts 
the ball rolling and proceedings will come to a close 
at Atlanta rather than at Lexington, as has been 
the case since Memphis quit the big line. 

George Nugent of Phoenix, who shipped east at the 
conclusion of the June meeting at the exposition and 
has been east of the Mississippi ever since then, 
is racing over the ice in eastern Canada, winning 
second money with the Del Coronado trotting mare. 
Princess Louise, in his first start at Toronto some 
days ago. 

Little Express (2) 2:20, Hi Hogoboom's futurity 
winner of 1914, who was purchased by the Canadians 
at the DeRyder sale here during the exposition race 
meeting, won second money in her first start over 
the ice at Winnipeg, being second in the first two 
heats and winning the third. The time was not fast. 
She is a nice young mare and as she was secured 
very reasonably her present owner ought to get his 
money out of her several times over. 

At a recent meeting of the members of the Busi- 
ness Men's Race and County Fair Association at 
Nebraska City, Nebraska, where California horsemen 
often drop off for a few starts on their way east in 
the early part of the season, the following officers 
were elected for the ensuing year: President, 
George W. Leidigh; vice-president, L. W. Roden- 
brock; secretary, H. B. Swalley: treasurer, W. A. 
Hughey; directors, A. Billings, Earl Beezely, E. H. 
Fisher, Tom Kastner and D. W. McCallum. A meet- 
ing will be given on June 13, 14 and 15, with liberal 
purses. 

<S><S>4> 

Word comes from his home in Thomasville that 
W. J. Andrews is gaining so satisfactorily that his 
physicians predict that he will again be able to do 
the teaming for the Pastime Stable by the time the 
Grand Circuit opens. In the meantime Ben White 
continues the active trainer for the Cleveland folks 
and will have the string in shape to race, by either 
Andrews or himself. Ben certainly stepped into the 
breach last summer when Billy had to retire and 
delivered the goods in excelent shape. "Two strings 
to your bow" are still advisable, even though the 
bow has given place to more modern arms. 
<?> <8> 

C. C. Christy, Kansas City, Mo., at one time one 
of the most prominent campaigners of trotters in the 
central west, died on January third at his home, at 
the age of sixty-five. Dick Benson raced his horses, 
one of the most successful of their number being the 
California bred gelding The Roman 2:09^, by Mc- 
Kinney 2:llVi, and out of the late F. H. Burke's fam- 
ous old lime trotting mare Wanda 2:14% by Eros. 
Dick won a number of excellent races with The 
Roman in 1902, and as Mr. Christy was a plunger of 
some pretensions when prices and conditions were to 
his liking, the cash returns from the campaign were 
not limited to the receipts from stakes and purses. 
<?><S><$> 

Bon Voyage 2:08, who for the past year or so has 
been in the hands of the well known Indiana horse- 
man, James Hazelton, of Frankfort, is being offered 
for sale again. His son Bon Courage 2:08^4. still 
owned here in California, was the fastest four-year- 
old trotting gelding of the season just passed, and 
as a two- and three-year-old was one of the best 
youngsters ever seen in this part of the world. Mr. 
Hazelton owns the grandly bred stallion Border 
Knight 2:121/4, whose blood is a combination of that 
of the two great present day families of Bingen and 
Peter the Great, and the overwhelming popularity of 
this fellow probably has something to do with the 
disposal of Bon Voyage. 

Sam Harris of Plymouth, Illinois, who made the 
long trip to the exposition fall meeting with the good 
trotter Axtien 2: 06 14. only to have the big fellow go 
wrong with him at the critical moment, reports that 
the son of Axworthy has rounded to in fine shape 
since getting home and that he will do to race again 
in 1916, from all present indications. Axtien is one 
of the few horses who had the honor to wrest a heat 
from the redoubtable Peter Scott during the season 
just passed, and his lack of condition at the races 
here in California was a great disappointment not 
only to his owner but to the crowds as well, as he 
had been figured as one of the principal contenders 
for honors in the big stake. 



Saturday, January 22, 1916] 



THE BRELJDER AND SPORTSMAN 



The expatriated Oklahoma trainer, Bi Shively, 
celebrated his advent in Canada by winning a seven- 
heat race on the ice at Hillcrest Park, Toronto, with 
Patchen Wilkes II. He also won second money in 
another race with Widower Peter, owned by his 
employer, W. H. Grosch of Milverton, Ont. — Horse 
Review. [This man Shively always was a "simultan- 
eous" sort of a cuss, as more than one western 
trainer and driver can testify from personal experi- 
ence.] 

^<$><» 

Six head of trotters and pacers composing the 
stable handled by the Canadian trainer, Vic Fleming, 
were suffocated in a Sunday morning fire at Dundas, 
Ontario, a couple of weeks ago, chief among them 
being the fast pacer Billy Brino 2:0G\i, whose cam- 
paign over the two-lap tracks in 1915 was a model 
of consistency. Starting in seventeen races on the 
twice arounds he was sixteen times first and once 
second, and was expected to figure extensively in 
the eastern ice racing this winter. He was just 
recovering from an attack of pneumonia when death 
put an end to his career. None of the horses lost in 
the fire were insured and the blow is a hard one for 
the owners and trainer. 

<S>'«><S> 

V. L. Shuler of Indianapolis, who consigned Peter 
McCormick to the Old Glory sale and then withdrew 
him when the time came for the auction to com- 
mence, evidently has the big fellow pretty well 
patched up again, as he is already being mentioned 
as a probable candidate for the next number of the 
M. and M. His many friends out here wish Mr. 
Shuler the best of luck with Peter, as he is without 
doubt one of the fastest and gamest sons of the 
premier of Patchen Wilkes Farm. Like the bird 
whose good looks were exceeded only by the size of 
his feet, the only thing about Peter that outranks his 
real racing qualities is his misfortune. Perhaps this 
is one year in which he can manage to escape the 
jinx that has hung to his trail. 

Does it pay a caretaker to attend as strictly to his 
humble business as though it were his own, and a 
more pretentious and profitable one at that? We 
always advanced the idea that it did, and can submit 
a number of authentic instances in support of that 
theory. The latest man to profit materially through 
the adoption of this system is Jack Clark, who has 
taken care of Peter Scott ever since that horse 
became a member of the Murphy stable. Owner 
Henry Oliver's holiday remembrance to Peter's groom 
coming in the shape of a check for one thousand 
dollars. Jack, whose husky likeness appeared on 
the cover page of this paper some weeks since along 
with that of Peter Scott, is a credit to his calling 
and the worst luck we wish him is that he draw 
down another thousand next season. 

<*>•«><?> 

Lulu Lumine 2: 06 14, the little western trotting 
mare for whom A. H. Cosden of New York paid 
somewhere in the neighborhood of twelve thousand 
dollars after the wonderful showing she made in 1913 
over the tracks of the Great Western Circuit, died 
very suddenly a few days ago at Walnut Hall Farm, 
where she had been left at the conclusion of the 
Lexington meeting last fall. So unexpected was her 
death, with no visible indications of any of the cus- 
tomary virulent illnesses to which horseflesh is heir, 
that an autopsy was held by a number of veterina- 
rians, their investigation revealing that she was a 
sufferer from an affection of the heart, a weakness 
that in all probability accounts for the disappoint- 
ing showing made by her for the past two seasons in 
Tommy Murphy's hands. Had she lived she would 
have mated in the spring to one of the prominent 
stallions of the Lexington neighborhood, though to 
which one had not been determined. 

In accordance with the usual custom, Allen Farm, 
Pittsfield, Mass., has recently issued the annual year 
book and price list, and attractive and instructive 
little booklets they are, even if the reader be not in 
the market for trotting horses. The year book gives 
a concise record of the performances of the various 
animals bred at the farm, or sired by its stallions, 
that were raced during the season of 191.5, and by 
referring to both year book and price list a prospec- 
tive buyer, or student of pedigree and performance, 
may learn exactly how the contemporary represen- 
tatives of the various crosses are racing, and be 
guided thereby. Every animal listed in the season's 
offering has the exact price appended to the descrip- 
tion, and buyers know exactly what to expect when 
they go to do business. Horses are absolutely as 
represented, the price asked in every instance is 
based on a full knowledge of their earning capacity 
under fair conditions, and by these methods the 
farm has built up a market for practically everything 
it produces. 



MR. BROOD MARE OWNER, do not by any chance 
neglect to nominate every mare bred in 1915 in the 
Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stake No. 16 which closes 
on Tuesday, February first. The decrease In breed- 
ing means that prices for really good horses will be 
just so much higher in the future, and the consequent 
falling off in futurity patronage means that your foals 
have just so much better chance to become money 
winners. It costs but $2 to make a nomination, a 
very small risk for the return it may make. 



Indiana horsemen are already booming Single G. 
2:02^4 as the next two-minute pacer, and as the Cam- 
bridge City bearcat came perilously near that mark 
at Lexington and then went home in excellent shape, 
the grounds for the Hoosier hopes are pretty solid. 
Along with nine other candidates for honors during 
the coming season he is being wintered by Curt Gos- 
nell at Cambridge City. 

<$><$><$> 

Mr. and Mrs. C. L. DeRyder, who had been in 
southern California since the closing days of last 
year, came home rather unexpectedly a few days ago, 
with Charley quite a little "under the weather." 
Several times during the year just passed he has 
been stibject to attacks of illness of a similar nature, 
superinduced by too many miles in the sulky in all 
sorts of weather, and some months ago he was 
warned by his physician that his riding activities in 
the future must be considerably curtailed. A long 
rest from that sort of work is on the program for 
him. and his countless friends join in wishing him 
a quick and complete return to health. 

<?><?><$> 

Andrew Albright, Jr., of Prospect Farm, Newark, 
N. J., has just added to his stable by purchase a 
young lady that is considered the very best one of 
her age in that section of the country, the brown 
filly Brownie Watts (2) 2:21%, now a three-year-old. 
This lass took her record last season over a very 
poor halfmile track after sixty days of work at the 
hands of her amateur owner, and the canny eastern 
trainers who know her have her tagged for a mile 
around 2:06 this season, if no untoward bad luck 
cuts her trail. Long distance information is that she 
is sound and good headed and she certainly is bred 
to be a trotter, her sire being General Watts and her 
dam Sarah Hamlin 2:1114, making her a full sister 
to that excellent campaigner Dick Watts 2:12Vi, w-ho 
has been such a good winner for the past two sea- 
sons in the hands of Herman Tyson. Mr. Albright 
left the east this week with California as his objec- 
tive point, and may have arrived in I>os Angeles on 
the tag end of the big storm that has just visited 
that section. 

The first death of the season among California 
horses of any note is reported by W. L. Hale of 
Bakersfleld, the stallion Athablo 2:24i^ having died 
at his place on the first day of the new year. Atha- 
blo, who was bred by George L. Warlow of Fresno, 
was a son of Diablo 2:09i/4 and the famous matron 
Athalie, dam of six performers and four speed sires, 
by Harkaway 2:28Vj. Athablo, foaled in 1896 but 
owned almost all his life in a section where harness 
horses were not bred to any great extent, is repre- 
sented in the list by half a dozen standard perform- 
ers, as follows: Athol R. 2:07%, Roan Hal 2:07%, 
Nogi 2:101/2, Dan S. 2:11%, Sextette 2:18 and Miss 
Dividend 2:20%, certainly an excellent showing for 
a sire of his opportunities. He was owned at the 
time of his death by the estate of E. J. Boust, his 
owner for the last several years, who died some three 
months ago at Taft. The estate has a number of 
excellent colts and fillies by Athablo, but under 
present conditions finds them hard to dispose of at 
any kind of an advantageous figure. 

<S>«><?> 

While the various portions of the country have 
been reporting winter weather of exceptional sever- 
ity, California, and especially the southern portion of 
the state, has been visited by the most severe storm 
of many years, the wind in certain localities attaining 
hurricane proportions and the rainfall, in the course 
of a ver>- few hours' time, measuring from four and 
a half to thirteen inches. The loss in life and prop- 
erty has b(>en heavy in certain neighborhoods, live- 
stock being drowned in some instances and many 
buildings, bridges and oil rigs being swept away by 
eitlicr wind or water or the combined efforts of the 
two. Clarence Berry chanced to b(> in the Maricopa 
district at the height of the storm and saw twelve 
out of fifteen rigs on one of his leases blown to 
pieces in almost as many minutes, all the operators 
in the district suffering to a similar extent. The 
wind at that point attained a velocity of over a hun- 
dred miles an hour, and while Mr. Berry admits that 
the sight was a wild and wonderful one whih? it 
lasted and tliat, since it had to hajipen he is glad 
he saw it, he admits with equal readiness that "once 
is enough." 

<J><S><S> 

A. B. Coxc of Paoli, Penn., arrived in California 
a few days ago on his annual winter visit and has 
been staying at the Palace Hotel in this city, visiting 
with local friends and horsemen prior to his d(>par- 
ture for the southern portion of the state, where he 
will remain for some weeks. A trip or so to Pl<>asan- 
ton produced much pleasure, and some congenial 
company at the Palace has resulted in the inaugura- 
tion at that hostelry of a "Coal Stove Circuit de 
Luxe," with mixed racing the order of the day. With 
Mr. Coxe as presiding judge some very fast miles 
have been driven or ridden by himself, John W. Con- 
sidin(>, Andrew Robertson of Melbourne, George 
Wingfield, and other chance comers whose entries 
were acceptable to the stewards, the sundown clause 
being disregarded with a great deal of regularity 
and other numerous infractions of the rules passing 
without censure. Nawbeek Farm, Mr. Coxe's home 
place, boasts one of the choicest bands of brood 
mares in the east, and has for the head of its stud 
at present the excellent young trotter Dillon Ax- 
worthy (3) 2:10'/i, a futurity winner and at five 
years of age a member of the great table of sires. 



THE GRAND CIRCUIT FOR 1916. 



Tlie meeting of the stewards of the Grand Circuit 
on January eleventh at Cleveland was marked espe- 
cially by the spirit of complete accord existing among 
those in attendance, none of the discordant elements 
that have made themselves manifest at various times 
in the past being in evidence. Unsettled conditions 
in Canada caused Montreal to relinciuish her claim 
for dates for the present, and Atlanta was added to 
the circuit, a move that will be noted with pleasure, 
heralding as it does the establisment of the trotter 
on a fitting scale in the south. Both Cleveland and 
Columbus will stage two meetings during the season, 
the circuit as finally decided upon being as follows: 

North Randall, O July 17-22 

Detroit luly 24-29 

Kalamazoo July 31-August 5 

Grand Rapids August 7-12 

Columbus August 14-19 

North Randall August 21-26 

New York August 28-September 2 

Hartford September 4-9 

Syracuse September 11-16 

Columbus September 18-30 

Lexington October 2-14 

Atlanta October 16-21 

The resolution introduced by President Devereux 
calling for a uniform series of stakes throughout the 
circuit, with an automatic elimination clause for 
money winners after a certain sum is credited to 
them, was adopted for a thorough trial, the condi- 
tions reading as follows: 

"$5,000 stake for trotters that never won $2,000 
gross, nor have a time or race record faster than 
2:141,4. To be raced for in three heats, $1,200 for 
the first heat, $1,500 for the second heat and $1,800 
for the third heat, purse in each heat to be divided 
50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. Of the balance, $150 to 
the winner of the event, $150 to the driver of the 
winner and $200 to the horses standing fifth and 
sixth in the final summaries, of which 70 per cent 
shall go to the fifth horse and 30 per cent to the 
sixth. 

"No starter in any heat can win more than one 
money. A distanced or drawn horse retains what 
money he has won prior, but loses his position in 
the final summary. 

"Of the horses that start in the third heat, the 
winner of the event shall be the horse, not distanced, 
that has won the most money; should there be a tie 
in the gross amount won, the horses tied shall race 
a fourth heat to determine the winner. 

"If a sum less than $5,000 is offered, all awards 
shall be made, in the same proportions. 

"A horse entered in these events shall be elegible 
to start until it has won $7,000 gross in them, when 
it becomes ineligible to start again in said events, 
and all entrance in said stakes to which said horse 
has become ineligible shall be refunded and the 
horse entitled to start in any early closing event to 
which its winning race record makes it eligible at 
the time it was so barred. The amount of entrance 
fee to be refunded is to be determined by the mem- 
ber in whose events the horse is pemiitted to start, 
start. 

"Every Grand Circuit meeting for 1916 is hereby 
required to offer the above stake under the above 
conditions. Entries to them to close at the same 
time as for all other early closing events of each 
meeting." 

A uniform time allowance system for the entire 
circuit was also adopted, in the following language: 

"Horses that have started anywhere in 1915 or 
1916 without winning a race shall be allowed one 
second. Horses that have started two or more times 
in 1915 or 1916 without winning a race shall be 
allowed two seconds. Horses whose winning race 
records were made prior to 1915 shall be allowed 
two seconds, provided they have not won a race in 
1915 or 1916. 

"These allowances shall hold good until a horse 
wins a race, and a horse granted any of these allow- 
ances shall, on winning races, be eligible to the 
class only in which his record made in that race 
enlitl(-s him to start, provided such record does not 
adiiiil him to a class slower than that to which his 
lime allowance made him eligible. If already entered 
in a class in which he gets an allowance and to 
which his winning performance renders him ineligi- 
ble he shall be entitlf d to start in any other class to 
whicli he is eligible. But if a horse has been entered 
in any races in which no allowance is claimed for it 
he sliall be allowed to start in such races. These 
allowances to be good for both early closing and 
class races." 

o 

The Grafton Country Club, Worcester, Mass., was 
recently the scene of an unusual social event, a 
dinner given in honor of the Whilinsville sportsman, 
Chester W. Lasell, who not only owns and breeds 
horses but trains and races them in person, with an 
unusual degree of success. Cotipled with Mr. Lasell 
as the guest of honor was the throe-year-old trotter 
Henry Todd (3) 2:10 with whom he won the Cham- 
I)lon Stallion Stakes at Empire City last season, the 
colt being brought to the banquet with all his para- 
phernalia, bearing the insrription "Oakhurst Farm." 
The big room at the club house was decorated as a 
racing stable, in the colors of Oakhurst Farm, and 
those present included not only the wealthy owner 
and his friends, but all the ('mployees that partici- 
pate in the establishment's activities. 



i 

! 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 22, 1916. 



g — 

ROD. GUN AND KENNEL 

CONDUCTED BY FISHER HUNT 



P 

WORLD'S LARGEST HATCHERY FOR OAK 
CREEK. 

The State architect's office is at work on plans and 
specifications for the largest fish hatchery in the 
world. The structure will be on Oak Creek near In- 
dependence in Inyo county and the definite news 
that it will be located there will be of interest to 
anglers in Southern California. 

Ernest Schaeffle, executive officer of the Fish and 
Game Commission, announces that work on the struc- 
ture will be rushed in order to get everything in 
readiness to operate in full capacity this season, 
which should see the hatchery completed by the first 
of June or the middle of the same month by the 
latest. The cost of the new plant will be in the neigh- 
borhood of $20,000 or $30,000, he estimates. 

It is planned to hatch 6,000,000 trout per season in 
the new hatchery. This will be sufficient to stock all 
the streams and creeks in Southern California. As a 
deal of revenue is derived from the southern portion 
of the state and there has been some protest in the 
past in not spending enough money in that territory, 
the expenditures and the good work outlined will be 
welcomed by our fellow statesmen in the south. 

There was some opposition from San Bernardino 
county for locating the new hatchery on Oak Creek, 
but the commission announces that for years the sit- 
uation has been studied closely and it is confident 
the best place possible has been selected. It is neces- 
sary to get the right kind of water and to be close 
to the supply of eggs to make a success of the new 
fish farm. Oak Creek is near the Rae Lakes, sixty 
in number, and is well stocked with rainbow trout. 
The commissioners are satisfied an abundance of 
eggs will be obtainable. Transportation facilities 
have also been considered and it has been learned 
that pack trains and wagons will be able to do the 
work. 

The hatchery will be the last word in a structure 
of its kind. The hatchery room proper will measure 
160 feet, making a 180 feet over all, and it will be 
42 feet wide, measured from inside. It will be con- 
structed of stone which will be found on the site and 
the roof will be of red tile. There will be cement 
floors and the finest equipment possible. The hatch- 
ery will easily be the largest and most modern to 
be found anywhere on the face of the globe, accord- 
ing to the fish and game commissioners, and Cali- 
fornians can take pride in it. 

Plans have been outlined to make the hatchery 
operations for 1916 just as extensive as they were 
last season. 

o 

Quite a change is to be made in the Fish and Game 
Commission. The Fresno Division in charge of A. D. 
Ferguson is to be abolished and the territory divided 
between the Sacramento and Los Angeles Divisions. 
This will leave the state three divisions to control 
the fish and game. A. D. Ferguson has been offered 
a position as special assistant to Ernest Schaeffle, 
executive officer. His work will consist in superin- 
tending the work of the deputies of the State. He 
will also assist in other lines. 

o 

THE FALL RUN OF SALMON. 



The fall run of salmon on the Sacramento river 
has been a very light one this year. The take of 
salmon eggs at the spawn-taking stations, which may 
be taken as an index of the size of the run, was no 
more than half the usual amount. 

The runs on Eel, Klamath, and Smith rivers, 
however, have been good and up to the average. 
On Eel river two species of salmon are taken, the 
quinnat (known in the North as king and Chinook) 
and the silver salmon. The netting season now 
opens on this stream on October 7, a much better 
arrangement, for the fish caught on the opening day 
were in excellent condition this year, which was far 
from the case in previous years, when the season 
opened later. The netting season now closes on 
December 7, which may be a little late to give the 
best protection to the two species of salmon and to 
the steelhead, which begins running in increased 
numbers late in November, but it is tar better than 
the old law which allowed netting until the end of 
January. Large numbers of the two species of sal- 
mon on Eel river are shipped fresh to San Francisco. 
A few are salted and mild cured. Salmon have not 
been canned on this stream for several years. 

On Klamath river two species, the quinnat and 
silver, are taken, and practically all are canned, very 
few being shipped fresh. 

On Smith river also both quinnat and silver salmon 
are found. Here the fish are canned, none being 
salted or shipped fresh. 

Quinnat salmon are caught in commercial quanti- 
ties in Monterey Bay in June, July and August. They 
are caught entirely by trolling. The catch this past 
summer exceeded two and a half million pounds, 
slightly exceeding the catch of last year, which was 
the largest catch ever made in the bay up to that 
time. — Fish and Game Commission. 



f 

••••■•••••••■•••■■•■••■■■■■■■■•■■■■a* 

GAME DEPUTY CLARENCE J. BERRY WOULD 
ARREST HIS OWN BROTHER HEN. 



"Investing authority in a man often makes him 
walk a pretty straight and narrow path," commented 
Clarence J. Berry, the well-known sportsman the 
other day in a fanning bee. "I remember some years 
ago when I was living at my home in Selma that 
the game warden swore me in as a deputy. Immedi- 
ately I secured all the literature possible on fish and 
game laws and I made the boys toe the mark. My 
brother Henry announced one day that he was going 
out after some quail. 

"You can't shoot quail at this time of the year," 
I told him. 

" 'Well, you just watch me,' was his come-back. 
"We argued for awhile and in the end I threatened 
to arrest him. I would, too, and Henry realized it 
and gave up his proposed hunting trip. The idea of 
having deputies is a great one." 

o 

GAME SEASON POOR IN NORTH. 



Guess how many ducks, geese, rails and coots were 
killed during the 1915-1916 open season, which closed 
Jan. 15 in the state of Oregon. 

Here is the answer, or approximately so — 26,000. 
This is the estimate volunteered by Wardens T. J. 
Craig and E. H. Clark, chief aids in Game Warden 
Carl Shoemaker's office. 

Last year, after a careful compilation, the game 
warden's office estimated the wild fowl killing at 
38,000 birds, but this figure is thought to exceed the 
present season by some 10,00 or 12,000 birds. 

Early in the season many of the lakes on the 
islands between Government Island and the lower 
end of Deer Island were dried up, necessitating pump- 
ing, and later in the season, along about the middle 
of December, too much moisture produced the oppo- 
site extreme. 

"Arrests for violation of the night hunting law have 
not been as many as in former years," vouchsafed 
Mr. Clark. "This is due to the fact that more sports- 
men are becoming educated to game and fish protec- 
tion." 

The season opened on October 1, but by far the 
best shooting was enjoyed during November. Severe 
storms drove the birds inland and, as the ponds had 
become normal, nearly all the hunters bagged the 
limit. In the latter part of November and in Decem- 
ber, the clubs encountered just the opposite condition 
which bothered them in October, too much water. 
During that time there was a continual downpour 
and many of the clubs were dater-logged and their 
blinds looked like so many fallen-down boathouses 
with just the roof sticking out of the water. 

As stated, the average bagging of the hunter fell 
far below that of years gone by, but even at that a 
lot of sport has been enjoyed by the "thorough- 
breds." The usual delegation of sportsmen from 
Eastern cities, Seattle and other sections of the 
country took part in the many shoots this season. 
These came to the Columbia lakes in preference to 
■hunting around their own localities, because of the 
finer birds here. 

There are about 150 duck clubs on the Oregon side 
of the Columbia river between Givernment Island 
and the lower end of Deer Island. Each club feeds 
the birds more than five tons of wheat every season. 
Wheat, combined with the natural food of wild fowl, 
will keep them in the finest condition. 

Carl Shoemaker, game warden, was operated on 
two weeks ago for a goitre and left a few days ago 
to recuperate at his home in Roseburg. 



The Golden Gate Gun Club, which plans to be 
active with a number of trap-shooting events this 
season, may be forced to locate new club shooting 
grounds. A dredger has been at work at West Ala- 
meda and may interfere with the blue rock brigade. 
President W. H. Price, secretary-treasurer T. D. 
Riley and the other officers are hoping that they 
will be able to stay there as it is handily located and 
all the members have come to know the grounds 
pretty well. 

* * * * 

It will not be long before every public student and 
scholar in our schools will be instructed in the value 
of wild game. The Fish and Game Commission is 
launching a campaign to have the instruction includ- 
ed in the regular studies. In addition there will be 
a new forestry course at the University of California. 

* * * * 
To the Breeder and Sportsman: 

"I very much regret to learn that our mutual 
friend, Mr. J. X. DeWitt, has "passed to that bourne 
from which no traveler returns." I met Mr. DeWitt 
ou my first trip to the West Coast in 1905. A friend- 
ship which sprang up at that time between us was 
never broken. ELMER E. SHANER, 

Treasurer and Manager. 



HEARD IN KENNEL CIRCLES. 



Miss Jean Forgeus, of the S. V. Kennels, intends 
to send her Ru.ssian wolfhound Nicholas East to com- 
pete with America's best at the Westminster show 
in New York on Washington's birthday. Nicholas 
won everything offered at the P.-P. I. E. show. 
t t t 

D. J. Tobin, an ardent fancier of the bull terrier, 
and owner of several good ones, reports that his 
bitch had a litter of eight puppies. The sire is 
King V. also owned by Tobin. Tobin intends to keep 
the litter and show them at the Golden Gate show, 
t t t 

The officers of the Golden Gate Kennel Club will 
hold a meeting this week to decide on the judges for 
their coming show. Irving C. Ackerman, president 
of the club, favors bringing an Eastern judge. Among 
the prominent judges whom Ackerman has extended 
invitations are: George S. Thomas, Walter H. 
Reeves, Dr. Henry Jarrett, Vint Breese and Alf Del- 
mont. All of the above judges with the exception 
of Reeves are well known on the Coast. 

t t t 

Mrs. Anita M. Baldwin, who recently imported four 
Airedale terriers for breeding purposes. Intends to 
breed them to Tintern Tip Top, a recently imported 
dog with a big English record. 

t t t 

Mrs. E. F. Brown, of Redwood City, owner of the 
largest aggregation of collies on the Pacific Coast, 
has started to prepare her best dogs for the show 
ring. They will be shown over the local circuit, 
t t t 

Fred B. McCay of Cathay, California, owner of the 
Oak Ridge Beagle kennels, will send a pack of twenty 
down to the Golden Gate show. The above kennels 
won all the honors at the Exposition show. 

t t t 

W. R. Bartley has bred his Airedale terrier Harves- 
ter to Floradora, a bitch that has done considerable 
winning. Bartley expects to get a flier from this 
mating. 

t t t 

American fanciers have been unusually active in 
importing Pomeranians of late and the following, 
taken from the Illustrated Kennel News, an English 
publication, gives an account of some notable pur- 
chases made by American fanciers from the Pomeria 
Kennels at Aberdare: 

"Business has been brisk at the Pomeria Kennels, 
Aberdare. Mrs. Williams has shipped to the order 
of Mr. Wakeman, of South Australia, two blacks in 
Aberdare Prince and Aberdare Queen. Another sale 
is that of the sweet black bitch Aberdare Jewel, that 
weighs 3 pounds. She goes to the kennel of Mrs. 
Hurning, of Pennsylvania, to be the companion of 
Aberdare Teddy and Aberdare Doll. It is to be hoped 
that Jewel will arrive safely and well, where she 
should render a good account of herself, as already 
she is a winner under Messrs. Raper and Reeves, her 
latest victories being two firsts and two cups at the 
hands of Mr. Theo. Marples at Tonypandy. She is 
well bred and is a direct descendant of Ch. Haughty 
Prince. Another beautiful black dog, Aberdare Tiny 
Blackie, has gone to join a kennel comrade in Aber- 
dare King at the Fortuna Kennels in Los Angeles, 
Cal. We hope he will accomplish his long journey 
successfully, and no doubt will maintain his reputa- 
tion when exhibited. Still another sale is of Aber- 
dare Wee Prince and Aberdare Pansy, a lovely brace 
of small Poms that have gone to Mr. Davis, an. Amer- 
ican fancier." 

t t t 

Heathcote Enchantress is the name of Messrs. 
Baldwin and Jones' recent importation. This young 
Airedale bitch has been a good winner in England 
and was placed reserve to the famous Vickery Ken- 
nel's Aman Gem at the last Birmingham all terrier 
show. She is a well bred one, claiming as her sire 
the noted champion Tintern Tip Top recently pur- 
chased by Mrs. Anita Baldwin, of California, which is 
said to be the best Airedale in England. Enchantress 
is being groomed for the Westminster and will make 
her debut in America at this important fixture, 
t i t 

At the Barbican the other day (this is where the 
coursing greyhounds are usually put up to auction in 
London), there was no lack of bidding, one first sea- 
son greyhound going for about $750 — at auction, mind 
you, and war times! Another lot of 38 brought about 
$2,500. 

t t t 

Mr. Andrew Albright, Jr., owner of the Baughfell 
Kennels, will pay California a visit next month. He 
has just purchased the great wire fox terrier Cham- 
pion Wycollar Boy. Wycollar Boy has beaten the lot 
on the other side, his latest win being at the Great 
Joint Terrier Show last month, where he topped the 
lot again. It took a long price to get him, but Mr. 
Albright is much pleased with his purchase. Mr. Al- 
bright has also purchased a very high class wire 
bitch, which he will bring out at New York, and 
thinks her capable of holding her own with the best, 
t t t 

Mr. Earl K. Breen is on a hunting trip in Mexico. 
Among the Airedales he has taken with him are the 
good winner. Blizzard Breen, and West Coast Water 
Baby (the latter by Champion Boughfell Briar), both 
of which he recently purchased from Kyle Onstott. 
Mr. Breen writes The Kennel Review that both are 
making good on everything from monkeys and par- 
rots to wild burros. 



O. N. Ford Proposes Big' Trap Shoot 



Saturday, January 22, 1916] 



GAME REPORTS FROM VALLEY AND NORTH. 



A. D. Ferguson, in charge of the Fresno division of 
the Fish and Game Commission, has some interesting 
reports on conditions in the San Joaquin valley, a 
favorite shooting country. He was in San Francisco 
during the week and looks forward to even more 
birds this coming season. 

"The present duck season has not been as good in 
our section of the State as in former years," said 
Ferguson. "At some places it was good, at others 
fair and in some it was very poor. The best shooting 
by far that has been recorded in the San Joaquin 
valley has been at the Widgeon Gun Club. Birds 
have been plentiful and the boys have taken the 
limit pretty nearly every time they have gone out. 

"At Gustine it was only fair. Los Ranos has been 
very poor. This was caused by Miller and Lux drain- 
ing the water off their lands during the summer. 
South of Los Banos at Fireball birds have been 
numerous. Tulare Lake has not produced as good 
sport as expected. Western Tulare, North Kern and 
Kemell have been good. There have been so many 
gunners out at Buena Vista Lake that limit bags have 
been rather scarce. 

"Geese are just commencing to put in an appear- 
ance. The big birds have arrived late this season 
for some reason but the hunters will find game plenti- 
ful until the season closes on the last of this month. 

"Our quail season was very successful. The new 
law closing the season on the last day of December 
proved satisfactory to the sportsmen. They appreci- 
ated the fact that the birds will be left for next 
season. Prospects are that 1916 will be the greatest 
quail hunting season we have had in 20 years. They 
produce well in wet years and it looks like we are 
going to have plenty of rain. 

"San Joaquin stands out as the greatest dove coun- 
try in the state. To show how they are hunted and 
pursued it is estimated that 40,000 doves were killed 
in Fresno county alone on the opening day of last 
season. The vast number of birds in our section is 
attributed to the fact that for the past six years the 
season has opened as late as September first while 
in former years it was in July and August. The 
doves were" accordingly given a chance to breed by 
countless millions. The restriction of the open dove 
season to the months of September, October and No- 
vember will have a general beneficial effect all over 
northern California. 

"I am pleased to report that the deer is increasing 
in our section. The opening of the season on Aug- 
ust 15th instead of July first has had a good effect. 
In the Sierra they are increasing in numbers and the 
game commission is being supported by the people 
in enforcing the law." 

Frank Cady, a deputy who has been patrolling Las- 
sen and Modoc counties, gives some data on game in 
those sections. 

Sage hen are reported as increasing, particularly 
in the Madeline Plains, where in the past two years 
a 50% increase has been reported. In Willow Creek 
Valley it Is now possible to get the limit of sage 
hens, and only a few years ago there were no birds 
in that section at all. 

Ducks still breed in goodly numbers throughout the 
entire county. The people of the county are uniform 
in their request that the present open season for 
the taking of ducks be changed. They suggest that 
either September 15th or October 1st would be very 
acceptable to them. If September 15th were given 
the season could close on December 15th; if October 
1st, it could close on Jan. 1st. They also recommend 
a smaller bag limit, — not greater than 15 per day, and 
many advocate only 10. 

Antelope are also increasing. The band near Span- 
ish Springs, which numbered two years ago nine 
now numbers 17 or 18. A band has shown up in the 
region to the northwest of Eagle Lake where for a 
number of years there have been no reports what- 
ever. There have been one or two instances where 
antelope have been killed along the state line by 
Pyramid Indians. The people of the county, however, 
very generally respect the protection given the ante- 
lope and very few are killed. 

Last winter it was reported to Cady by a reliable 
individual that he had counted 107 mule deer in the 
hills to the south of the Madeline Plains. Another 
individual at the same time reported a band of nearly 
100 in the hills to the north of the plains. This was 
in the latter part of December or the first of January 
in the winter of 1915. 

Pheasants are increasing. A brood of 12 birds 
was raised about 25 miles farther down the valley 
from where the original plant was made. Near Su- 
sanville on one ranch there are about 40 or 50 that 
show up every day for feed. The ranchers uniformly 
are in favor of protecting the birds and as soon as 
it is reported that any are on the ranch, hunting is 
prohibited. 

Cady believes that he ran on to three Hungarian 
partridges on the east side of Honey Lake. These 
birds were seen in a location which is not favorable 
to mountain quail, and while Cady is somewhat in 
doubt as to what they were, he believes that they 
were the Hungarian partridges. 

o 

The "farthest north" gun club is situated at Nome, 
Alaska. The "gold diggers" are not satisfied with 
this claim, and every once in awhile pull off a mid- 
night target shoot under the northern sun. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



THE BREEDER ANL SPORTSMAN 



O. N. Ford, manager and secretary of the San Jose 
Blue Rock Club, is out with a proposal to launch an 
interclub trap-shoot in Northern California. Mr. Ford 
points out that the trap season will soon open and 
now is the time to get out and work up some inter- 
est in the "sport alluring." His id(\i is for a ten- 
man team match between four or five clubs in the 
northern part of the State. Details as to tlie condi- 
tions of the matches, etc.. can be found in the follow- 
ing letter received on Monday: 
"To the Breeder and Sportsman: 

"I want to propose to the gun clubs of Northern 
California that we get up a ten-man shoot for five or 
six clubs. This would be my idea of the same: Have 
five or six clubs enter the contest and shoot one 
contest on each club's grounds once every month. 
With five clubs entered it would extend the competi- 
tion to five months. Then have a BIG ONE at the 
finish. 

"Ten men to a team would mean fifty or sixty 
shooters at each contest. The conditions would b(> 
to shoot 200 targets. Each club could add $100 in 
cash to the program, second $100 to count in full 
contest. We can get five entries all right in a close 
radius. San Francisco, Sacramento and San Jose 
could enter one team apiece. Vallejo, Martinez and 
the Family Club could combine to get one aggrega- 
tion. Stockton, Newman and Modesto could furnish 
the other team to make five all told. All south of 
San Jose to Santa ISIaria could put up a good team of 
ten men. Los Banos, Fresno and Lindsay could also 
enter the competition with a combined squad. 

"We have five right here, however, in a golden 
circle. My idea of the financial end is to have each 
shooter put up $1 at each shoot, which would make 



PRESS REPORTS ON FIELD TRIALS. 



The condensed press reports on the field trials held 
in the south last week are as follows: 

Montgomery (Ala.), January 14. — Gunner, a setter, 
the winner of the American Field Futurity, was 
awarded first money, $500, in the Derby stake of the 
National Field Trials Club, whose 1916 meet was con- 
cluded on the reservation at Calhoun today. Gunner 
is owned by Bedford & Fleischmann of New York 
city. 

Second money, $300, went to Attakapa's Rap, the 
entiT of I. G. Abney of Shreveport, La., and third 
money, $200, was awarded to King's Cy, the entry of 
Dr. T. E. Barber of Grand Fords, N. D. The free for 
all stake of the National Field Trials Club will be run 
over the reservation of the club at Calhoun, begin- 
ning January 24th. 

The all-age stake of the National Field Trials Club 
was completed yesterday. The pointer Lewis C. Mor- 
ris, entered by I. J. Rowe, Birmingham, Ala., was 
awarded first money, $500, and a silver cup. Second 
money,, $300, was won by Gibraltar Ollie, a setter, 
owned by George C. Parsons of Kennebunk, and third 
money, $200, went to John Proctor, a pointer, owned 
by A. L. Curtis of Belton, Tex. The trials will close 
with the running of the second series of the Derby 
Stake tomorrow. 



Rogers Springs, Tenn., Jan. 15. — Mississippi Sport, 
a setter owned by R. H. Sidway of Buffalo, N. Y., and 
handled by P. C. Ellis, Boonevill(>, Miss., today was 
awarded the title of amateur champion hunting dog 
over a field of fifteen which ccwupeted in the cham- 
pionship stake of the All-America field trials club 
here. 

Mississippi Sport ran in the finals against the set- 
ter Netherby Jack, entered by William Armstrong of 
High Point, N. C, and handled by Dr. V. 11. Miller of 
Bolivar, T<'nn., and won first place by a narrow mar- 
gin on bird work. Netherby Jack was placed second. 

Bain's Dam, another Sidway entry, handled by 
Ellis, won the third money, and the setter Doc 
Roller, owned by T. T. Ashford, Birmingham, Ala., 
and handled by H. W. Brooks, Springville, Ala., was 
placed fourth. 

Th(! amateur Derby, the final event of the All- 
Anierican trials, was not concluded today. 

o 

SCHUETZEN CLUB ELECTS OFFICERS. 



The California Schuetzen Club, at its annual meet- 
ing held last week, elected the following officers for 
the current year: President, John S. Leulenegger; 
vice-president. Otto A. Bremer; secretary, John 
Heissner; treasurer. Captain Joseph Straub; trus- 
tees, A. L. Ott, L. Willie, J. Waller; directors, A. L. 
Ott, J. S. Leutenegger, E. Polili, F. Levers, J. Waller, 
C. von Hartwig, A. Pollak. President Leutenegger, 
who was re-elected, was presented with a silver cup. 
Ex-President A. L. Ott made the presentation on be- 
half of the club as a token of appreciation of Presi- 
dent Leutenegger's s(!rvices. The annual distribution 
of prizes was followed by a banquet. 

At the monthly shoot, held Sunday on the Califor- 
nia Schuetzen Club range, San Rafael, Charles B. 
Morris won the best ticket on the honorary target 
with a score of G7, no re-entry. Following arc the 
highest five scores on tha target: 

Charles B. Morris, 67; Otto A. Bremer, 66; L. Wil- 
lie, 65; George A. Pattberg, 64; H. Schroeder. 64. 

Monthly competition shoot.— L. Willie, 219, 213, 



$50 for a total of $250 for the five meets. For the 
sixth meet (>itlier buy ten trophies for the winning 
team or add the $250 to the money secured from the 
club that will secure the event. Let all the boys 
shoot for this. 

"The match could be started in May and have one 
shoot each month until it is over. This will attract 
a fin(> crowd to the traps each Sunday of the compe- 
tition. One man can be selected from each team en- 
tered to form a committe(> to decide how the money 
will be divid<Hl. A vote could be taken at the first 
shoot to determine what will be done with the money 
at the finish of the season. 

"Let us get busy, boys, and show the East that 
we are alive out here on the Pacific Coast. Let's 
hear from some of the clubs I have mentioned rela- 
tive to a shoot of this kind. 

"Yours respectfully, O. N. FORD." 

"San Jo.se, Cal., Jan 17th." 



The Breeder and Sportsman will be pleased to 
publish the views of any other enthusiastic sports- 
men regarding the match trap-shoot as suggested by 
Mr. Ford. The idea appears to be a good one as it 
will have a tendency to increase the interest in trap- 
shooting and attract public attention. 

In Eastern sections, competitions similar to the 
ono outlined by Mr. Ford are held at regular inter- 
vals and have proved a success. It will serve another 
purpose of bringing the blue rock busters together in 
friendly gatherings and afford a chance to get better 
acquainted with the boys you read about. So, get 
busy, trap shooters and talk over the proposition, and 
if it looks all right get in line with Mr. Ford. 



212; John Frei, 219, 208; Otto A. Bremer, 216, 210; 
John S. Leutenegger, 195; H. Schroeder, 184; J. H. 
Millett, 179, 179, 168; A. von Wyl, 171; Joseph Ca- 
pelli 161, 161, 143, 143. 

Monthly bullseye competition. — George Heissner, 
161: George A. Pattberg, 404; John Frei, 444; Philo 
Jacoby, 754; C. B. Morris, 824; Otto A. Bremer, 939; 
Joseph Capelli, 1223; L. Willie, 1340; Charles Ott, 
2132; Captain Joseph Straub, 2157; H. Schroeder, 
2300; John S. Leutenegger, 2491; J. H. Millett, 2702; 
A. von Wyl, 2730. 

o 

NATIONALS SHOOT AT SHELL MOUND. 



Sergeant Frank J. Povey made a score of 76, the 
highest of the day in the initial shoot of the year of 
the Nationals on the Shell Mound range on Sunday. 

Following are the principal scores of the day: 

Captain H. H. Mitchell, 57; Lieutenant A. R. Coons, 
73; P. Lichtenstein, 73; Sergeant C. A. Ilauge, 64; 
Corporal J. Edwardson, 37; C. McMillan, 24; J. L. 
Beamont, 71; W. E. Bassett, 57; Corporal M. D. Sul- 
livan, 42; Corporal J. H. Lunn, 53; E. Ramsey, 50; 
C. Bauer, 42; G. Stokes, 16; T. O'Leary, 28; II. Mc- 
Nally, 43; H. McLaughlin, 20; R. L. Yaeger, 61; Ser- 
geant M. T. Langlais, 54; Corporal E. C. Carrasco, 45; 
L. M. Behr, 56; A. F. Povev, 40; C. R. Eaton, 62; 
W. E. Laycock, 64; G. W. Bantel, 18; E. Love, 18; A. 
W. Fox, 53; Sergeant E. Carr. 38; R. Carr, 9; G. Tim- 
mermann, 29; Corporal G. T. O'Neill, 62; Corporal 
L. A. Crabbe, 44; P. Chatard. 29; R. J. Landini, 28; 
H. Smith, 43; F. Collins, 14; J. Schunk, 13; W. Mc- 
Gowan, 11; H. Haiiegress, 21. 

Veterans — Captain J. C. Nagel, 51; Lieutenant H. 
W. Mitchell, 60; Lieutenant S. H. Stewart, 72; Ser- 
geant F. J. Povey, 76; Sergeant B. Hopkins, 61; C. J. 
VVeatherby, 64; C. B. Heinemann, 71. 

Pistol scores — F. J. Povey, 83; Captain J. C. Nagel, 
68; P. Lichtenstein, 80; F. R. Dlebold, 44; C. J. 
Weatherby, 65; J. L. Beaumont, 77; C. R. Eaton, 60; 
T. O'Leary, 56; W. H. Finley, 37; II. McLaughlin, 67; 
W. E. Laycock, 26; Lieutenant S. H. Stewart, 75; 
Sergeant C. A. Haufe, 65. 

■ — o 

OUR AMBASSADOR IS SOME MARKSMAN; 
KILLS TWO DEER WITH ONE SHOT. 



Berlin (By Mail). — Out hunting with the American 
Military Attache in Berlin, Colonel Kuhns, Ambassa- 
dor Gerard killed two small deer with one shot. The 
colonel on the Other hand, fired two shots without 
hitting a (Ivvvl 

Did Gerard's friends not know that he was an 
expert-crack-never-niiss-an-aim rifleman, they yould 
think this an accident, but this is the second time 
this winter that Gerard killed two deer with one 
shot. Today it liai)pened thus: 

Gerard and th(> colonel went out to the ambassa- 
dor's game preserve near Berlin. Two small deer 
appeared. Gerard fired at one. The bullet went 
through its heart, slock a rib, glanced out the side 
and went through the second deer. More game 
appeared and the officer took a shot and another 
shot, but the deer disappeared. 

On their way home Gerard decided he would like 
to bag a duck for dinner, because Mrs. Gerard's 
mother is visiting here !ind likes duck. It was dark. 
The ambassador spotted one, fired and bagged it. But 
when he got it home it was too old to eat. 

"That's what I get for shooting ducks at night," 
remarked Gerard smilingly when he reached the 
embassy. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 22, 1916. 



i Sportsmen's Row 1 



Col. E. R. Culhbert, one of the most prominent 
hunters on the Pacific coast, left by steamer last 
Saturday for Panama. He is going after bis game 
and has mapped out several expeditions in quest of 
alligators. Col. Cuthbert has hunted extensively in 
Mexico and knows a thing or two about alligators 
so that his friends need not worry about him falling 
into a pair of iron jaws. Col. Cuthbert is al.so going 
after other game for Panama has been reported as a 
country where wild game of all description can be 
found in abundance. 

* * * * 

Captain A. W. duBray is worried because his 
single barrel will not arrive in time for the opening 
of the trapshooting season. 

* * * * 

J. Walter Scott is going to show us what a Purdy 
can do to the rocks when the right time comes. 

* « * ¥ 

Joel S. French is more interested in securing new 
members for the gun clubs than smashing records. 
Mr. French goes in for all lines of sporting compe- 
titions. He is an enthusiast on field trials. 

* * * * 

Otto Feudner says he will show us some of his 
new stunts this coming season. If he succeeds the 
boys had better watch him, for he ranks away up 
on past performances. 

* * * * 

Guy Clark is already in strict training to get in 
tip-top shape to hit her up properly at the traps. 

* « « * 

Our friend Tony Prior is working some long dis- 
tance shots at ducks during the open season. Prac- 
ticing for the 22-yard mark, I guess. 

* * * * 

I have heard that our favorite, Tom Wilkes, has 
quit Salt Lake. The answer must be that Tom 
doesn't wish to miss the opening Golden Gate Club 
shoot. 

* * • * 

George Thomas is expecting to make things hum 
with his 34-inch shooting iron. George figures to 
be right there, too. 

* * * * 

Willard Terrel promises to be a regular visitor 
every week this season. Willard don't talk much 
but he certainly can make the smoke fly. 

* « * * 

Colonel Dorsey would never miss a trap shoot if 
the fishing season was closed for good. At that, the 
Colonel gets out pretty often for he likes outdoor 
sports of all descriptions. 

* « * * 

Ed Hoag says Sobrante is the place to have a blue 
rock shoot. The background looks easy to Ed. 

* * * * 

Some of the rocks that got away last year we will 
have a chance to get again — Dr. Mac. 

t * * * 

A. G. Wilkes, president of the Pacific Coast Field 
Trials, is in communication with C. H. Babcock rela- 
tive to sending back a pair of dogs to the big circuit. 
Babcock will be remembered as the former handler 
of the late W. W. Van Orsdall's Del Rey Kennels. 
He has been quite successful with setters and point- 
ers since invading the East five or six years ago. 
The dogs Mr. Wilkes has in mind to try their fortune 
against the best in the country are Kenwood Sam, 
winner of the derby this year at Bakersfield, and 
Melrose Rod. S. Christenson is thinking of sending 
back Orange Blossom, the bitch that was second in 
the All-Age stake. 

* * * * 

Attention of lovers of a good gun is called to the 
advertisement in our business section of the Parker 
Gun. The Parker Gun has won the Great American 
Handicap nine out of twenty-five offerings — once with 
a perfect score of 100 straight. It has other great 
feats to its credit to recommend its use. 

* * * * 

Pete Walsh declares that anyone can shoot dead 
birds but it takes some expert to win a medal for 
the live ones. Show it to the boys, Pete. 

* * * * 

Hughie Wobber don't need to have his gun loaded. 
He can simply stretch his arms and legs a bit and 
poke the barrel of his gun into the center as the 
rocks leave the bulkhead. 

t. 4: * * 

It is to be hoped that Barney Worthin has not 
blown out his long run with the night-sight gun he 
won. 

« 3{c 4: 3Ji 

Bill Price says the fellow that wrote "O, why 
.should the spirit of mortal be proud," never won a 
challenge cup in the Golden Gate Club. 

* * * * 

Eugene Forester could make a better score if the 
tui-n-up in the discard was a jack. Fifteen two, fif- 
teen four, etc. 

* * t ^ 

We would see more of Bill Sanborn if Uncle Sam 
would issue a recall for all the automobiles. 

* * * • 

We hope to see more of our genial friend, Fred 
Burnham, this year at Alameda. He keeps the boys 
in good spirits. 



If J. Henry .lones could make the smoke fly from 
the rocks like he does from that old pipe of his he 
would be the Smokum Kid. 

^ « # 4c 

John Connolly and Rube Harris can be seen every 
week with a nice string of ducks. No wonder they 
can always run up a good score on the rocks. 

* * * * 

Bill Higgins thinks the Sacramento Club will take 
up all of his time and attention. So long, Bill. 

* * a: * 

Our gonial friend, Pop Merrill, is getting the Mo- 
raja Valley club ready for the boys. It will be right 
up to the minute. 

« « * * 
Larry Middleton can be seen any day at his office 
pointing his trusty at an imaginary bird. Not much 
longer to wait, arry. 

* * * * 

One of the old guard. Bill Simontoh, is visiting 
San Francisco. Bill says he wishes he could stay 
for the grand opening but Du Pont is Du Pont. 

* * * * 

Al Cook is back from the north. Al predicts that 
he is going to show us how records are made with 
his brand new Western. 

* * * * 

Ted Riley has ordered about 50,000 new shells. 
Every blue rock will be a duck that Ted didn't shoot 
this year. 

» * * * 
It is very noticeable around the Copper Kettle Club 
that the boys are polishing up their shooting irons 
for some purpose. Bill says it's signs of blue rocks. 
* « * 

Bill Stadfeld is going to order a black sweater so 
that those who shoot can read his shells. Bill will 
be right there when the season opens. 

* * * * 

Walter Burlingame, the genial treasurer of the San 
Francisco Chronicle, has an ark on the San Antonio 
Creek and every week-in finds him hiking for the 
sausalito ferry. Mr. Burlingame is an ardent devotee 
of the rod. 

* * * » 

Al Wilson and Bob Sangster get a deal of sport out 
of their gasoline launch. Both are exports with the 
rod and reel as well as with the gun and get a deal 
of sport on the water. 

o • 

FISHING AND SHOOTING AT A STANDSTILL. 



Fishing and shooting around local points has come 
to a standstill. Comparatively few of the regulars 
are oven venturing out in the bad weather conditions 
and those that have braved the rain and wind bring 
back discouraging reports of lack of fish and game. 
For the past three weeks there has been little or 
nothing doing. 

Predictions are further made that there is little 
promise of an improvement before the open season 
closes. The duck season concludes on the last day 
of this month and the birds will hardly be available 
while the rain continues. Whole flocks of ducks 
have been sighted on the bay but sighted only, for 
they stay far out of gun range. 

The near-by streams and creeks are in such condi- 
tion that the anglers have given up attempts to land 
any good baskets. 

* * • * 

The California Anglers' Association is going to 
hold its eleventh annual meeting and smoker on 
Monday night next at the club rooms, 93.5 Market 
street. Members have cordially been invited to at- 
tend and join in the fun. 

* * * • 

Ducks have been so scarce in the Suisun marshes 
that the members of the Cordelia Club have closed 
up for the season. They figured that it was hardly 
worth while staying open until the bars go up the 
last day of the month. The storm and rains have 
played havoc with the sport around the bay points. 

H. E. Foster reports that he noticed the first Wil- 
son snipe (Gallinago delicata) on Winters Island, 
Contra Costa county, on September 27, 1915. Eigh- 
teen birds were in the flock but when seen again on 
October 3rd they were in fewer numbers. 

* * * * 

The San Francisco Striped Bass Club held the 
annual election of officers on Monday night. Alvin 
W. Thornton was re-elected president, W. Von Doh- 
len, vice-president; J. S. Turner, secretary; Charles 
H. Kewell, treasurer, and N. Rothman, captain. The 
ladies' night and distribution of prizes was staged 
Thursday night at a downtown restaurant. 

* * * * 

"In a certain quarter it is recommended that Cali- 
fornia adopt the game preserve system of Great 
Britain and Ireland, but that system allows only per- 
sons of fortune to hunt, while California follows the 
theory that fish and game belong to the people of 
the state unless the legislature permits private 
rights," said Carl Westerfeld, State Fish and Game 
Commissioner, in his talk at the weekly luncheon of 
the League for Home Rule in Taxation. 

"One out of every 665 persons hunt in Great Brit- 
ain while in California the ratio is one to 15. 

"Seventy men in Scotland own all the deer shoot- 
ing privileges. In California 19,000,000 acres are set 
aside for game preserve, which is equal to the total 
area of Scotland. 

"There are about 5,000,000 hunters in the United 
States, who, in case of war, would form a large 
army." 



ELK GIVEN TO ALABAMA. 



Hon. John H. Wallace, game and fish commissioner 
of Alabama, received a telegram recently from the 
keeper of Yellowstone Park informing him that he 
had caught-fifty elk and was ready to ship them to 
him. They are a gife from the United States to 
the State of Alabama, and the keeper of Yellowstone 
Park was busy for some time catching the fifty elk 
to be presented by Uncle Sam to this State. A bill 
was passed by the last Legislature authorizing Mr. 
Wallace to bring the elk to Alabama and turn them 
loose on land suitable for their propagation, on a line 
north of Calera, which is the natural habitat of the 
elk. The bill was passed all right protecting the elk 
in Alabama for a period of ten years, but at the last 
moment Senator Lusq had an amendment attached to 
the bill saying that Alabama should not pay any of 
the freight for bringing the elk to this State. Com- 
missioner Wallace, however, has a scheme on foot 
to get the railroads to bring the elk through without 
cost to the State, as he is very much interested in 
getting this number of elk on Alabama soil. He is 
of the opinion that with a fair chance they would 
multiply rapidly, and at the end of ten years would 
be plentiful enough to make good shooting for those 
who like to hunt big game. — Big Game Hunter, in 
American Field. 

■ o 

MOVE MADE TO PROTECT TUNA FISHING. 



Plans have been completed for the purchase of a 
power boat to control the Coast from San Luis Obis- 
po to the Mexican line. In the past the deputies have 
been forced to depend upon hiring craft to fulfill their 
duties and they have been at a big disadvantage. 
The move is in a direction to protect the tuna fishing 
industry, which is making itself prominent as each 
year goes by. 

\ sort of international question presents itself in 
looking after these fish that have jumped into popu- 
larity . The California Fish and Game in comment- 
ing on the subject says: 

"It is reported that representatives from the Pacific 
Coast will ask our government to seek the purchase 
of Lower California from Mexico. Lower California, 
besides the harbor of Magdalena Bay, possesses val- 
uable fishing resources. Many of the sea fishes taken 
in California waters spend their spawning season off 
Lower California. In fact, that is their principal resi- 
dence and they follow their food into California 
waters during the summer time. To properly con- 
serve these fish, the most important of which is the 
long-finned tuna, it will be necessary to protect the 
young and the spawning fish in Lower California 
waters. The value of the long-finned tuna pack in 
California exceeds $1,500,000 a year and the stability 
of this great industry will depend on the protection 
the fish get in Lower California. This protection 
could best be given if the United States government 
had control, for Mexico ha,s not protected her west 
coast fisheries in the past and is not likely to do so 
for some time in the future. 

o 

RARE BIRD KILLED BY DUCK HUNTER. 



While in Minneapolis recently, Edward Banks of 
Wilmington, Del., came across a rare bird that had 
just been killed by a duck hunter on a lake not far 
from Minneapolis, the bird being shot while flying 
with a flock of mallards. 

This hybrid is a curiosity, the 'indications being 
that it is a cross between a mallard drake and a 
Canada goose, having a glossy or metallic green head 
and upper neck with the white ring dividing the dark 
chestnut coloring of the breast and down on the 
body; the bill is orange yellow; the short wings are 
mottled; legs and web feet orange yellow; body ashy 
gray and in size and conformation that of a goose; 
it weighed when killed ten pounds. 

It is certainly a rare avis, and we do not recall 
another specimen of the kind. 

In speaking of the bird Frank G. Simpson of Win- 
nipeg, Man., says: "I have never seen one of the 
kind, though I have heard of it, and my idea is that 
it is a mallard drake cross on a Canada goose; if it 
had weighed less than ten pounds the cross might 
possibly have been on a Hutchins goose or white 
front albifrons. I do not think that a full green head 
and neck would be so likely of production from a 
gander and mallard duck; moreover, a mallard drake 
would more easily accomplish the act on a goose on 
account of his size and activity, whereas a Canada 
gander would have difficulty in treading so small a 
bird as a mallard duck. The fact of its having been 
found amongst mallards might mean that life with 
them was more congenial than with geese, which are 
of a very clannish nature and not at all tolerant of 
other birds associating with them." — American Field. 

o^ 

TELLING THE AGE OF A FISH. 



The age of a fish can be determined with accuracy 
by inspection of the otoliths, or bony concretions, 
which are found in the auditory apparatus. These 
otoliths increase in size during the entire life of the 
fish, each year adding two layers, a light colored 
layer formed in summer and a dark layer formed in 
autumn and winter. The alternate layers are sharply 
contrasted and very distinct, so that there is not 
difficulty in counting them. The number of pairs 
of layers is equal to the number of years the fish has 
lived. — Scientific American. 



Saturday, January 22, 1916] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



McCLOUD RIVER SITUATION. 



The Fish and Game Commission has learned that 
at a recent joint meeting of tlie boards of supervisors 
of Shasta and Siskiyou counties at Redding, the ad- 
visability of condemning, purchasing and throwing 
open to the public to fish of thirty miles of the Mc- 
Cloud river was considered. The land and water is 
owned by a number of wealthy people, who have 
placed barb wires and prohibited anglers from enjoy- 
ing their favorite sport. In this they are said to be 
within their rights to control privately-owned prop- 
erty but under political code 4085%, declaring innav- 
igable streams may be declared public highways by 
action of the county supervisors, there is ground to 
secure the fishing stream for the benefit of the public 
at large. 

The thirty miles of the McCloud river is said to be 
one of the finest trout streams anywhere in the coun- 
try. It extends in Shasta and Siskiyou counties and 
the supervisors of these counties are being urged to 
take action. For years the stream has been stocked 
with trout at the expense of the state. The super- 
visors seem to be in favor of granting the appeal of 
the anglers throughout California but are hesitating 
for lack of available funds with which to purchase 
the property. In order to get around this difficulty 
it is.said that anglers are willing to raise several 
thousands of dollars to help defray the expense. 

The Fish and Game Commission is on record as 
approving the contemplated action of the supervis- 
ors. It sees no reason for tying up the great trout 
stream and preventing the anglers of the state from 
enjoying their favorite sport. 

o 

BRUNER WINS VERNON CLUB TROPHY. 



Once more the Vernon Gun Club shooters played 
the great outdoor sport of "dodging the raindrops and 
getting the targets" Sunday morning and afternoon, 
when the eleventh fifty-bird contest for the Wilshire 
trophy was staged. Stanton A. Bruner copped' the 
eleventh leg on this trophy, bringing true his predic- 
tions of last week. His score was forty-seven birds 
broken out of the fifty thrown. He was also winner 
in class A in the second competition on the four silver 
loving cups, showing himself to be some shooter 
w^hen he gets down to business. 

C. E. Groat, president of the Vemonites, tied with 
"Doc" Packard for second high score, each breaking 
forty-six out of the fifty. 

Nineteen shooters in all showed, and all of them 
competed in the Wilshire competition. The gunners 
were rather surprised at seeing George Oliver of 
Hercules fame on the grounds. George broke forty- 
seven out of the fifty also, which is better shooting 
than he has displayed in some months. Tough luck 
for Oliver that he is a professional. 

Du Pont Guy Holohan also came out in his new 
motorboat and broke forty-four. 

Sheriff John C. Cline and son, Harry Cline, were 
also among the tarhawk squelchers to take a crack 
at the birds. The scores: 





Hfip. 


For cup. 


Practice. 


Name — • 


Yds. 


Trg-. 


Brk. 


TrK. Brk. 


R. L. Hall 


18 


50 


40 


100 


91 




18 


50 


43 


50 


38 


A. W. Rruner 


16 


50 


41 


50 


39 




16 


50 


45 


50 


41 




16 


50 


47 


75 


58 




16 


50 


44 


50 


45 


S. A. Rniner 


1!) 


50 


47 


100 


94 




18 


50 


36 


25 


23 




16 


50 


41 


50 


44 


Dicrdoff '. 


17 


50 




25 


20 




16 


50 


36 


25 


20 




19 


50 


46 








19 


50 


44 


75 


63 


S. W. Trout 


18 


50 


45 






L W. Casmer 


16 


50 


33 


25 


16 


H. C. Marshall , , 


16 


50 


42 


75 


63 


C. E. Groat 


16 


50 


46 


75 


62 




16 


50 


42 






J. W. Cline 


16 






2.5 


21 


SEVEN YEAR 




OLD LAD 


A CRACK 


SHOT. 





Seven and a half years — starting from the time 
when one first sees the light of day — wouldn't seem 
much time in which to get a start in life, would it? 

However, Richard L. Beck, youngest son of Mr. 
and Mrs. F. G. Beck of Bridgeport, Ohio, hasn't even 
needed all of this short period to get his name before 
the people of the Buckeye State and finally, through 
the press, to the entire country. 

Long before Richard was big enough to know for 
certain whether the big stream that runs near his 
home is the Atlantic Ocean or the ()hio River, his 
father began to school him in the use of firearms. 
A few weeks ago, Richard's parents took him to the 
local photographer and had his picture taken with a 
Remington .22 calibre rifle at his side. The picture 
shows that the rille, which is only about thirty-nine 
inches long, reaches up well past the youthful marks- 
man's chin, which is all the more evidence that this 
particular candidate for the Hall of Fame among 
shooters is not unusually tall for his age. 

Although the people of Belmont county, in which 
Richard lives, of many of the surrounding counties 
and particularly of the nearby city of Wheeling, W. 
Va., had long known of the Bridgeport boy's prowess, 
Richard did not make his best record until the latter 
part of lOl.") when, shooting at a %-inch bull's-eye 
from standard distances, he scored 5.5 out of a pos- 
sible GO points with twelve shots, 28 out of a possible 
30 with six shots and 23 out of a possible 25 with 
five shots. This phenomenal shooting attracted so 
much attention that the story was printed in Wheel- 
ing papers and has since found its way into many 
other publications. 



MISSOURI QUAIL FOR WASHINGTON. 



A shipment o fone hundred and fifty-six quail has 
been received in Spokane, Wash., from Kansas City, 
Mo., completing the consignment of six hundred birds 
purchased by the Spokane County game and fish com- 
missioners to be distributed in Spokane county this 
winter. Out of a total of six hundred and one birds 
shipped to Spokane, five hundred and ninety-nine of 
the feathered stock arrived in excellent condition. 
The total cost to the sportsmen of Spokane county 
for the birds was $1,192.56, of which $1,100 was for 
the birds and $92.56 for express from Kansas City 
to Spokane. The cost of the birds is taken from the 
general game fund, wliich results from the payment 
of license fees to the county each year and is turned 
over to the county commission to improve the bird 
and fish situation in Spokane county. Tli(> birds will 
be taken out into the country and liberated only on 
ground where shooting is allowed by the farmers. 
Where "no shooting" signs are posted, no birds will 
be distributed. Arrangements have also been com- 
pleted with the Spokane & Inland and the Washing- 
ton Water Power Company whereby freight crews 
of trains running out of Spokane will carry a supply 
of grain hay to be distributed along the right-of-way 
as a food supply for tlie quail and pheasants. The 
game warden of Spokane will also make trips into 
the country daily and distribute food for the birds 
in places not reached by the train crews. 



GRAIN DONATED TO FEED STARVING BIRDS 
OF THE NORTHWEST. 



Seattle millers have set an example for aiding the 
King county game commission to keep the game 
birds of that section from starving. Recently one 
firm presented five tons of screenings to the commis- 
sion, while another sent in two tons. Both contri- 
butions were packed in small 10-pound cartons or 
sacks. The King county game commission mailed 
the parcels to the children of the rural schools 
throughout the county for distribution. 

Members of the Tacoma game commission have 
started a campaign in the hope that some of the Ta- 
coma millers will follow the example set in Seattle. 
They say that help is needed badly or the pheasants 
and quail are liable to die of starvation. 

o 

DEATH OF MR. GEO. L. LYON. 



The following press announcement from Albuquer- 
que, New Mexico, will be read with deep regret by 
every trapshootei in America: 

George L. Lyon, 34, of Durham, N. C, amateur 
champion trapshooter, died here today of tubercu- 
losis. He had been a resident of the city five weeks 
and was but recently elevated to the thirty-third de- 
gree in Masonry. 

George L. Lyon has held the undisputed champion- 
ship as the world's most expert trap shooter since 
1911. He won the title in the closing day's shoot of 
the Westy Hogan tourney, held on Young Ocean Pier, 
Atlantic City. Lester German, the Maryland profes- 
sional, was the closest contestant for the inanimate 
target championship and the "E. C." cup. The two 
led the field of fifteen best amateurs and profession- 
als in the country, when they tied with 179 out of 
a possible 200. 

German challenged the victor to defend the cup 
and a meet was arranged for the succeeding month 
on the grounds of the DuPont Gun Club in Wilming- 
ton. "Chief Bull Durham" Lyon, the title he earned 
athletically, retained the cliampionship of the world, 
winning from German by a scoi-e of 174 to 170, each 
man shooting at 200 targets. The contestants then 
shot at 50 targets eaclv under the expert rules, Lyon 
breaking 40 and German 42. 

Because of his expert marksmanship he was select- 
ed as a representative -from the United States in 
July, 1912, to the Olympic games in Stockholm, Swe- 
den. He was made coach and captain of twenty good 
marksmen that made the tour. 

He added further laurels to his brilliant career as 
a trapshooter when in May, 1915, he made a clean 
sweep of the New York Athletic Club's tenth annual 
amateur championship at clay targets. He made two 
new records. The highest score in the history of 
the sport was made— 191 out of 200— beating 143 con- 
testants. In the preliminary championship during 
the previous April he won with a new record of 191 
out of 200. 

George Lyon was bom in Durham, North Carolina, 
February 3, 1881. His marriage to Miss Snowden 
Carr was solemnized on November 6. 1900. Mr. Ly- 
on's mother was Miss Mary Duke, sister of Jas. B. 
and I5enjaniin Duke, of New York City, tobacco manu- 
fac'turers. 

His inheritances and accumulations contributed to 
net him a wealthy income. His personal wealth was 
estimated at a half million dollars. 

• o 

CALIFORNIA TROUT SEASON IS BOOSTED. 



J. Buchanan Siders of Los Angeles is of the opinion 
that 1915 was the most successful trout season ever 
experienced in California. In the following article 
to an Eastern i)ublication, Mr. Siders has the follow- 
ing to say of the sport: 



The trout sea.son in California, which has recently 
closed, has been the most successful of any ever 
experienced in the history of the state. This was 
made doubly sure on account of the great number of 



visitors here this year. wl\o canio to see tlio exposi- 
tions. Their California friends would take them to 
the mountains and the lakes to "lure the speckled 
beauties." 

And it may truthfully be said that more pounds of 
trout were caught in California this year than in any 
other state in the Union. 

In the early part of the season trout fishing was 
good in all of the streams which flowed directly into 
the sea or into some large river. But during the 
latter part of the season the largest catches were 
nuide in the mountain lakes. 

Lake Tahoe seemed to be a favorite for the big 
fellows. Some fine specimens were caught there 
W'hich weighed over twenty pounds. 

One caught in Lake Tahoe by Mr. Gus Hagermann 
weighed 18 pounds. 

Mr. Hagermann made another very successful trip 
from his home at Rubicon Springs, Lake Tahoe, to 
Barker Springs, where he found the trout very anx- 
ious to take the artificial bait, and he soon landed 
ten beauties. 

Big Bear and Little Bear lakes in San Bernardino 
county proved to be meccas for the fishermen this 
season. The trout in these lakes were very lively 
and seemed to be hungry. They pounced upon every 
grasslioi)per and cricket which was so unlucky as to 
fall into the lakes, and then, when the fishermen cast 
the lures into the greenish blue waters, there was a 
rush and a swish and a big fight was on. None of 
these trout will come out without a terrific battle. 

The trout fishing laws in this state seem to be 
very satisfactory to the fishermen now. Tlie (Jame 
and Fish Commission will keep on restocking lakes 
and streams as they have done and will try to in- 
crease th(> supply of this splendid game fish. 

A string of of twenty-five was caught in Little Bear 
lake by Mr. J. Lenthensee, of Los Angeles, in three 
hours. 

As the trout cannot be taken with pump-guns or 
caught from a seat in an automobile with any great 
success, they have a fair chance to escape exter- 
mination. 

o 

NOTES GATHERED HERE AND THERE. 



The members of the Injunction Gun Club of Colusa 
have each been served with a summons requiring 
them to appear before the superior court and show 
cause why they should not be restrained from tres- 
passing on the hunting lands of Ellis & Myers, who 
have leased the lands of the Moulton Irrigated Lands 
company for hunting purposes. 

The plaintiffs ask that defendants be restrained 
and enjoined from entering and trespassing upon 
said leased land, or shooting, killing or driving away 
ducks, geese and other wild game birds thereon. 

That an injunction pendente life be issued. 

That plaintiffs have such other, further and differ- 
ent relief as the court may deem just and equitable 
and for costs of suit. 

The defcuidants were also notified that an action 
had been brought against them in the superior court 
by the plaintiffs, Ellis & Myers, and that the com- 
plaints in the action had been filed in the office of 
the county clerk. 

They were also directed and required to appear and 
answer the complaint within ten days after the serv- 
ice of the summons; that if they failed to appear and 
answer said complaints, judgment will be taken for 
any money or damages demanded in the said com- 
plaint. 

* * * * 

Ton) Hunt, keeper of the Glide Gun Club grounds 
on th(- Yolo side below Sacramento, was drowned 
and Pat Bolan, his companion, was rescued from the 
water after his cries had attracted the attention of 
a dredger crew. 

Hunt and Bolan were returning to the club 
grounds in a duck boat, which was laden with pro- 
visions. When they were within a short distance of 
the dredge Lisbon, which is at work in the Yolo 
basin, th(> boat capsized. Hunt was unable to save 
himself, and Bolan, who clung to the side of the boat 
as it whirled over and over, attracted the attention 
of dredged employes, who rescued him from the 
water and also recovered the body of hunt. 

IBint had been to SacranuMito to see his mother off 
to San Francisco and was returning to his duties at 
tlie club grounds when the accident occurred. 

* ♦ ♦ • 

A man who resides in Arnold. Wis., was recently 
arrested for shipping one hundred and thirty-seven 
grouse to a commission man in Chicago. He pleaded 
guilty to the charge and was fined $640 and costs. 
The birds were confiscated by the deputy wardens 
making the arrest. This is said to be the largest fine 
ever imposc-d in Wisconsin for violation of the state 
ganie law. 

* * * • 

The home of Ty Cobb, the great baseball player, is 
in Georgia, and each winter after the ball-playing 
season ends, he spends most of his time ganu- shoot- 
ing. He has recently become financially interested 
in a large game preserve in his native state, and 
every winter henceforth he will indulge his love for 
hunting to a greater extent than ever before. Ty is 
said to be a very good game shot, as well as a good 
ball player. One day recently, with three compan- 
ions, the quartet bagged sixty-five quail and one wild 
turkey, and it is said that one of the party exceeded 
the bag limit. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



xz 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, Januar>' 22, 1916. 



THE FARM 



THE FERTILIZER SITUATION IN 
THE UNITED STATES. 



Washington, D. C. January 3.— The 
Sforetary of Agriculture today made 
the following statement regarding the 
fertilizer situation: 

American farmers are confronted by 
a serious situation in reference to fer- 
tilizer materials. As a result of the 
embargo placed by the German gov- 
ernment on the e.xportation of potash, 
the supply of this substance has been 
entirely cut off. Under normal condi- 
tions sulphuric acid, which is required 
for making super-phosphates, is sold 
lor .$5.00 or $6.00 a ton. The increased 
demand for it since the breaking out 
of the European war has caused the 
price to rise to about $25.00 a ton. It 
is impossible therefore for farmers to 
secure super-phosphates at prices 
which they have been accustomed to 
pay. The nitrogen supply is not ma- 
tt;rially less than usual. 

In 1913, when conditions were nor- 
mal, about $125,280,000 worth of com- 
mercial fertilizers was used in the 
United States. Of this amount, the 
farmers paid $48,830,000 for nitrogen- 
ous substances, $56,000,000 for phos- 
phates, and $20,450,000 for potash 
salts. Practically all the potash salts 
were imported from Germany and the 



Warranted 

to give satisfaction. 




GOMBAULT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

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Bemovea all Bunches from Horses or 
Cattls. 

Aa a KEMiatX for Rhen- 

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wa, Saad tor daaorlpttva droulart, tOBtlmo- 
dala, MsT Addnaa 

m UVBORI-TIUIiJU OSIPijrr, MeteUnd, Obi« 



Modern Horse Management 

By 

CAPT. R. S. TIMMIS 

Nearly 500 photographs and drawings. 
144 Plates 11x8. Royal quarto, 316 
pages. Cassell & Co.: London, To- 
ronto, Melbourne, etc. Stokes & Co.: 
New York. $4.00. (See Breeder and 
Sportsman, Nov. 27, '15.) 

Sporting and Dramatic News, Lon- 
don — "A most valuable authority." 

The Field — "Very sound and well 
thought out." 

Horse and Hound — "A book that 
should be widely known." 

Bloodstock Breeders' Review — "The 
fruits of a tree whose roots are 
grounded in practical experience." 

Sporting Life— "Worthy to take its 
place as a standard work." 

Irish Field — "A valuable addition to 
the home library." 

The Broad Arrow — "Should be In the 
possession of every horse owner." 

New York Spur — "Should strike a 
popular note." 

Chicago Horse Review — "The fruit of 
practical experience." 

Horse World, Buffalo — "On a scale 
not heretofore attempted by a 
writer." 

Farm Life, London — "Deserves the 
widest possible appreciation." 



entire quantity of nitrate of soda came 
from Chile. Ammonium sulphate to 
the value of $3,720,000 was received 
from abroad, mainly from England. 
The remainder of the fertilizer ma- 
terials was derived from domestic 
sources. 

THE POTASH SITUATION. 
There is practically no potash in 
this country at the present time for 
fertilizer use. The small quantities 
which were held over from former 
years are now priced at from eight to 
twelve times their normal value. The 
investigations of the Department and 
the Geological Survey have .shown the 
possibility of producing from Ameri- 
can sources an ample supply of potash 
salts for domestic consumption. These 
sources are: The giant kelp of the 
Pacific Coast from Lower California 
to Alaska; the alunite deposits, mainly 
in the mountains of Utah ; the felds- 
pathic rocks of the eastern part of the 
United States; and the mud of Searles 
Lake, in California. 

Feldspar and Searles Lake: The 
production of potash from feldspar is 
commercially feasible if a salable by- 
product can be secured at the same 
time. The suggestion has been made 
by the Bureau of Soils that cement is 
a possible product from the feldspar 
treated to render the potash soluble. 
But the difficulty of marketing this 
cement in competition with thorough- 
ly standardized products would be a 
great deterring factor. 

The development of Searles Lake as 
a source of potash presents a number 
of unsolved technical problems. In 
addition, the question of title to the 
property is so involved that consid- 
erable time will elapse before it can 
be settled. In the meantime nothing 
can be done. 

Alunite. — Alunite, a mineral which 
evists in considerable quantities in 
Utah and neighboring States, contains 
about 11 per cent of potash. It is de- 
composed by roasting at a tempera- 
ture of about 700 degrees, with the 
evolution of oxids of sulphur, and a 
residue consisting of alumina and po- 
tassium sulphate remains. From this 
residue the potash salt can be obtained 
readily by leaching and evaporation. 
The process is simple. The fumes lib- 
erated can be used to manufacture 
sulpluiric acid. Alumina resulting as 
a by-product will be suitable for the 
manufacture of metallic aluminum. 
One large company has begun the 
manufacture of potash from alunite 
and is reported to have made some 
preliminary shipments. It is under- 
stood that another large concern is 
about to begin the erection of the 
necessary plant for the production of 
potash from this mineral. 

Giant Kelp Beds. — An ample supply 
of potash for the needs of farmers can 
be obtained from the giant kelp beds. 
These beds have been surveyed by the 
Bureau of Soils and a report, accom- 
panied by maps showing in detail 
their extent and location, recently has 
been issued. Harvesting is accom- 
plished easily, as the kelp grows in 
open water and barges fitted with 
mowing attachments can be used. 

For utilizing the kelp several meth- 
ods are feasible. It may be dried and 
ground. In this condition it contains 
all the salts originally present, which 
are mainly potassium chlorid and so- 
dium chlorid. This material has ideal 
mechanical properties for use in 
mixed fertilizers. When the pure po- 
tassium chlorid is desired it is neces- 
sary to separate the juice from the or- 
ganic material and then remove the 
sodium chlorid. The latter can be 
done readily by recrystallization; but 
the separation of the juice from the 
organic material is more difficult, for 
the reason that the kelp is nonflbrous 
and in attempts to effect separation 
by filtration the filters became clogged 
and unworkable. The problems yet to 
be worked out commercially are the 
best methods of drying the wet kelp 
and of effecting the ready and efficient 
separation of the plant juices from the 
organic material. Investigation of 
these questions has proceeded far 
enough to indicate that their solution 
should not be very difficult. 

Three large concerns have begun 
operations for the manufacture of pot- 
ash from kelp. While potash is indis- 
pensable in the preparation of fertil- 
izers, it is also used for many other 
purposes, including the manufacture of 
matches, glass, liquid soap, and muni- 



tions. The prices offered under exist- 
ing conditions by the manufacturers 
of such articles undoubtedly will cause 
practically the entire output of these 
concerns to be diverted from the fer- 
tilizer industry. It seems unlikely 
that normal conditions will be restored 
in the immediate future and that pot- 
ash can be secured from foreign coun- 
tries as heretofore in time for the next 
crop planting season. It also seems 
improbable that private enterprise 
will provide potash from domestic 
sources for agricultural purposes in 
time. It would require ninety or more 
plants, costing approximately $50,000 
and having an operating capital of 
about $25,000 each, to produce the 
quantity needed for agriculture. This 
would involve the assumption that the 
commercial phases of the problem 
were satisfactorily solved. Even if the 
requisite funds were available, it is a 
question whether operations could be- 
gin in time to provide an adequate 
supply for the coming year. The De- 
partment is investigating all aspects 
of the question and is planning to 
send experts to California to study the 
situation and especially to consider 
the possibilities of production on a 
commercial scale. 

One fact has operated in a measure 
to enhance private enterprise in this 
field. There is no legislation in any 
of the Pacific Coast States, along 
whose shores the kelp lies, providing 
for the leasing of kelp beds. Without 
leases private investors would have 
no assurance that plants erected by 
them would have the necessary con- 
trol over the kelp within their vicinity. 
The Department's officers will discuss 
this matter with the proper authori- 
ties in the Pacific Coast States and 
will urge the necessity of legislation 
regulating the use of the beds. 

THE PHOSPHATE SITUATION. 

Acid phosphate is the basis of near- 
ly all commercial mixed fertilizers. It 
is made by the action of sulphuric acid 
upon phosphate rock. Our available 
sources of phosphate rock are greater 
than those of any other nation. The 
main supply for domestic consumption 
and for exportation comes from Ten- 
nessee, South Carolina, and Florida. 
The United States Government, how- 
ever, owns vast deposits of phosphate 
rock in Utah, Wyoming, Montana, and 
neighboring States. These deposits 
have been withdrawn from private use 
pending legislation for their utiliza- 
tion and no supply has yet been devel- 
oped from this source. 

In 1914, 2,734,000 tons of phosphate 
rock were produced in this country. 
Up to that year about one-half the 
quantity mined was exported from Eu- 
rope. The rock in its natural state is 
not readily absorbed as a plant food. 
It is made available for this purpose 
by treatrftent with sulphuric acid, 
about 1 ton of the acid being used to 
a ton of phosphate rock. When thus 
treated, a super-phosphate containing 
14 to 18 per cent of water-soluble 
phosphoric acid is made. The bulk of 
the sulphuric acid which enters into 
the manufacture of acid phosphate is 
made by fertilizer companies. Prac- 
tically every fertilizer establishment 
excepting the cottonseed meal facto- 
ries) having an annual capacity of 
15,000 tons or more operates also a 
sulphuric acid plant. The demand for 
the acid is so strong at present that 
every effort is being made to utilize 
old and abandoned establishments and 
to erect new plants. The latter opera- 
tion is slow and costly on account of 
the large amount of lead necessary for 
the construction of acid chambers. 
Difficulty is also being experienced in 
securing an adequate supply of py- 
rites, which is the principal source of 
sulphur. 

The potential sources of sulphuric 
acid in the United States are ample to 
produce more than double the present 
annual output. Few of the lead, zinc, 
or copper smelting companies using 
sulphide ores have sulphuric acid 
plants in connection with their smel- 
ters. The fumes discharged into the 
atmosphere by these smelters are suf- 
ficient to produce many thousands of 
tons of sulphuric acid daily. Under 
normal conditions, the limited market 
for the acid and the long haul neces- 
sary to reach the market have made it 
commercially impracticable to convert 
the fumes into sulphuric acid. It is 
entirely feasible to erect sulphuric 
acid plants in connection with the cop- 



per, zinc, and lead smelters using sul- 
phide ores. The concentrates of the 
ores may be roasted in furnaces inde- 
pendent of the smelting plants or the 
fumes may be delivered direct to the 
acid chambers. 

The erection of acid plants of suffi- 
cient capacity to convert the smelter 
gases would involve an outlay of at 
least several million dollars. Under 
normal conditions it would take four 
months to complete the plants. In the 
present situation, at least six months 
would be required. The Bureau of 
Soils estimates that sulphuric acid 
could be made by some of the w^est- 
ern smelting plants at approximately 
one-half the normal cost of producing 

[Continued on Page 14] 





PERCHERON STALLION WANTED. 

Will buy, lease or trade. Must be 
blocky and registered. 

J. H. NELSON, 
Box 361, Selma, Cal. 



FOR SALE— Black McKinney stallion 
and niare — brother and sister — 7 and 8 
year.*! old. Standard and Registered. 
Both converted to high class gaited sad- 
dle hor.ses — single foot, running walk, etc. 
Lady can ride; perfectly sound. Make 
excellent cross with any highly bred 
stock. They are both ribbon winners in 
show ring. Can be seen at San Francisco 
Riding School, 701 Seventh Ave. Phone 
Pacific 1655. OSCAR ROMANDER. 



FOR SALE. 

BE.ST POLICY 42378. one of the best 
bred horses in the world. Handsome bay 
horse, small star in forehead, left hind 
pa.stern and left fore heel white. Has size, 
heavy boned, stylish, pure gaited trotter, 
sound, and a splendid individual in every 
respect. Best Policy is by Allerton 5128, 
dam Bxine 2:18Vi by Expedition, next 
dam Euxine by Axtell, next dam Russia 
by Harold 413, next dam Miss Russell, 
dam of Maud S., etc. Best Policy has 
trotted a mile on the Hanford half mile 
track 'in 2:12. He is ten years old and 
with little training would make a good 
gome race horse, and ninety percent of 
hi.s colts are trotters. He will be sold at 
a great sacrifice. For price and further 
particulars address 

BREEDER & SPORTSMAN, 
P. O. Box 447, San Francisco, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

New "Ideal McMurray " light track cart for 
matinees. \vorliOut,s. speedintr and jOKtrinv. Kirst- 
class. down to dati' cart, weight 1.^ to 50 pounds. 
Great strength and carrying power, absolute 
freedom of any horse motion. Conat»ucted from 
the lieft second growth white hiclrory. Kest 
guaranteed grade of pneumatic tires, handsome- 
ly liiiished in rich carmine or royal blue, with 
brass screen dash, detacliable, and accessories 
consisting of serviceable foot pump, complete 
tool and repaii Icit. wrenches, oil can. etc.. etc. 
Weight crat«d 90 pounds. Hrand new and will 
be shipped to any address. For price address: 
F. W. KKLLKV. 

BREf;ilFK A.NI. Si'OItTSMAN. 

HIGH-CLASS TROTTING BRED COLTS 
FOR SALE. 

No. 1. Three-year-old fllly sired by All 
Style, dam Dr. Hicks. This nily is regis- 
tered. 

No. 2. Two-year-old colt, full brother 
to the above. 

No. 3. Two-year-old fllly sired by Dan 
Logan, dam a Wilkes mare who was a 
groat natural pacer but unfortunately was 
crippled by a barbed wire accident as a 
yearling Jind was never worked. 

The All Styles are large, strong built, 
With all the style of their sire, perfect In 
action, and all three of the above colts 
should make race horses second to none. 
The Dan Logan fllly is perfectly gentle to 
handle and drive and is a high-class flliy 
in every respect. Apply to or address, 
I. F. EATON, Chico, Cal. 



Saturday, January 22, 1916] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



IS 



BEAUTIFUL BELVEDERE 



LOTS FOR SALE 



CORINTHIAN ISLAND Subdivision to Belvedere is the 
most beautiful spot on the shores of San Francisco Bay 
for a suburban home. It commands an extensive view of 
the City of San Francisco, Alcatraz and Angel Islands, 
Raccoon Straits, San Francisco Bay, Richardson's Bay, 
the Berkeley shore, beautiful Belvedere and Mt. Tamal- 
pais. It is in Marin County, directly opposite San Fran- 
cisco, and forms the eastern shore of Belvedere cove. 
It has a naturally terraced, sunny, western slope that is 
well adapted for many choice residence sites, every one 
affording most picturesque views of the bay and moun- 
tain. It is protected from the prevailing western trade winds in 
summer by Belvedere Island, and from the southerly storms in 
winter by Angel Island. The soil is fertile and part of the island 
is well wooded. 

It is less subject to fog than any other place near San 
Francisco. The summer fog, as it rolls in from the ocean, splits 
on the western slope of Sausalito, part of it flowing in a line with 
Angel Island towards the Berkeley shore, and part of it along 
the southern slope of Mt. Tamalpais, leaving Belvedere, Corin- 
thian Island and Raccoon Straits in the bright sunlight, while 
the fog banks can be seen as a white wall both to the north and 
the south. 

There is very little available land about the shores of San 
Francisco Bay that is desirable for homes, especially for those 
who love boating and kindred sports. The Alameda and Contra 
Costa shores of the bay are the lee shores and receive the full 
brunt of the boisterous trade winds which lash the shoal waters 
near the land into muddy waves, making boating both unpleas- 
ant and dangerous. To the north of the city and in Marin 
County the land from Sausalito to the entrance of the bay is a 
Government reservation and will never be placed on the market. 
The shores of Richardson's Bay are not at present convenient 
to boat service and, aside from Belvedere and Corinthian Island, 
there is little or no land near any ferry landing that possesses 
the natural advantages, improvements and possibilities that are 
offered on Corinthian Island. Concrete roads, pure water, tele- 
phone service and electric light wires are already installed. It is 
only ten minutes' walk from any point on the property to 
Tiburon boats, and but forty-three minutes' ride to the foot of 
Market Street. 

On the point of Corinthian Island the Corinthian Yacht 
Club has had its home for many years, and on any summer day 
the white sails of its numerous fleet add to the charming scene, 
as the trim yachts glide about the cove. Excellent fishing of all 
kinds for bay fish, including salmon, the gamey striped bass, 
rock fish and the toothsome silver smelt, is to be had in the cove. 
There is probably no spot so accessible and in such close prox- 
imity to any large city in the world that offers the attractions 
of climate, magnificent scenery, fishing and boating as will here 
be found. 



FOR MAPS, PRICES AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO 



S. L. PLANT, 

PLANT RUBBER AND SUPPLY CO. 

32 BEALE STREET 

San Francisco, Cai. 



6H. 



F. W. KELLEY, 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN OFFICE, 

366 PACIFIC BUILDING 

San Francisco, Cal. 



14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 22, 1916. 



THE FERTILIZER SITUATION 



[Continued from Page 12] 

the acid in the East where pyrites is 
used. The saving in cost of manufac- 
ture in the west, however, would be 
partly offset by the long haul neces- 
sary to bring the acid to the eastern 
market. 

In view of the difficulties in the way 
of the production and utilization of 
sulphuric acid for fertilizer purposes, 
the Bureau of Soils has endeavored to 
develop a commercial method, involv- 
ing the use of the electric furnace, for 
manufacturing phosphoric acid, which 
can be used as a substitute. Through 
this method double super-phospate, 
which will contain 40 to 50 per cent of 
water-soluble phosphoric acid, or the 
still more concentrated form of am- 
monium phosphate, could be secured. 
But the use of the electric furnace for 
the purpose is commercially feasible 
only where phosphate rock, coal, and 
cheap water power are readily avail- 
able. The Department is investigating 
this matter to ascertain whether there 
are localities where these conditions 
exist and where, therefore, double 
super-phosphate may be made. 
THE NITROGEN SITUATION. 

The nitrogen situation is of less 
pressing concern. Cottonseed meal 
forms the bulk of the nitrogenous 
substances entering into commercial 
fertilizers. The amount available for 
fertilizer use is dependent upon the 
annual production of cotton and the 
demand for the meal for feeding stuffs. 
The supply of dried blood and tank- 
age, also sources of nitrogenous ma- 
terial, is dependent upon the number 
of animals slaughtered. Only a few 
large packing concerns conserve these 
products, which are now used to a 
considerable extent as cattle feed as 
well as for fertilizer purposes. Inves- 
tigations of the Bureau of Soils have 
shown that there is a large amount of 
waste from the fisheries and fish can- 
neries, especially on the Pacific Coast 
and in Alaska. This material could 
and should be made into fish scrap. 



which would have a value of about 
$1,200,000 for fertilizer purposes. 

Owing to the demand for nitric acid 
for munition purposes, the price of 
nitrate of soda advanced approximate- 
ly $1.10 per hundred pounds during the 
year prior to November, 1915. Only a 
vtry small percentage of the nitrates 
imported from the Chilean beds goes 
into fertilizers, being mainly incor- 
porated in special brands for green- 
house and trucking purposes. This 
item alone, therefore, will not cause 
much embarrassment to American 
farmers. 

One of the most important sources 
of nitrogen for commercial fertilizer 
purposes is ammonium sulphate. This 
is produced as a by-product in the de- 
structive distillation of coal for the 
preparation of coke. The nitrogen 
contained in the coal is evolved as 
ammonia and is caught and neutral- 
ized with sulphuric acid. Formerly 
all coke was made in the beehive oven 
which did not provide for the confine- 
ment of the combustible gases pro- 
duced. These were burned as evolved 
and the ammonia carried by them was 
likewise lost. The domestic produc- 
tion of ammonium sulphate from the 
coke oven is only one-fifth of what it 
could be were the beehive oven en- 
tirely displaced by more modern 
types. During the past few years 
there has been a slow transition from 
the use of the beehive oven. It is not 
imperative, therefore, to resort to ex- 
treme measures to increase the pro- 
duction of ammonia. 

[Concluded Next Week.] 

o 

THE HISTORY OF AXLE GREASE 

15 y 

The Whittier-Coburn Company, 

Makers of C & S AXLE GREASE and 
C & S GRAPHITE AXLE GREASE. 



While lubricants have been used on 
axles ever since the first pair of 
wheels was corved out of wood, the 
F.xle grease of the present day is of 
comparatively recent manufacture. 



Probably the first lubricant of any 
kind to be used on axles was pure 
animal fat — quite similar in every re- 
spect to the grease the housewife of 
today uses in greasing her pans. This 
met the requirements df that day and 
generation . . . and indeed, it is still 
used in some parts of the world. 

We need go no farther than Cuba, 
or Central America, where the big 
clumsy wooden wheeled, ox-drawn 
carts are still in vogue. Each carrets, 
as they are called, carries a bottle of 
grease tied to the axle, so it will be 
handy when needed. Owing to the 
poor lubricating qualities of this tal- 
low, the axles must be greased fre- 
quently. 

What a contrast between this and 
our present day methods! 

Various kinds of oils have been used 
for axle lubricants, but for the rea- 
sons, that they were too expensive, 
not heavy enough, etc., they have been 
discarded, notably Castor Oil, which is 
now prohibitive in price. 

The ideal axle grease must embody 
these points — a good lubricant — must 



not contain acids that will injure the 
axle — must be durable — of sufficient 
consistency to withstand the summer 
heat— and in wet and stormy weather 
during the winter. Axle Greace must 
be sufficiently adhesive (without be- 
ing gummy) so that the water will not 
wash it from the axles. Flake Graph- 
ite added in the manufacture to regu- 
lar Amber Colored Axle Grease makes 
a combination which is particularly 
fitted to overcome moisture, and that 
is why A GRAPHITE AXLE GREASE 
is recommended during the winter 
months. 

The labor-saving American public is 
willing to pay for anything that will, 
in the end, save them time or money. 
Although there are many cheap grades 
of axle grease on the market, the best 
brands which cost a trifle more are 
the only kind that have given satisfac- 
tion. Sensible purchasers throughout 
the world realize that quality means 
more than price, and that cheap 
greases cost more in the end. — For 
that reason, sales of high-grade axle 
greases are increasing every year. 



r 



NO RADICAL CHANGES 

The new Model 80 Ma.storpiece 
joufring cart has no radical 
changes over the Model 8 Faultless 
cart, our biggest seller for many 
years. The mechanical design is 
the .same but various details here 
and there have been improved on 
the -suggestion of our President, 
W. H. Houghton (the premier con- 
.structive genius of the turf vehicle 
world) and other thoughtful horse- 
men. The first Masterpiece stood 
a rigorous seven months test before 
the new model was placed on the 
market. Send for booklet 206, 
which tells an interesting story of 
these details. A postal will do. 
Tliank you! 

Houghton Sulky Co., 320 Lincoln Ave., Marion, Ohio 




Harpers Weekly and The Breeder and Sportsman 

$5.52 WORTH FOR $3.^ 



Breeder and Sportsman 

One Year, 52 Copies, Regular Price $3 

THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN Is the oldest 
weekly Journal devoted to the Horse west of Chicago, 
having been established in 1882. This interest, together 
with the Kennei, Gun, Fishing, Coursing and kindred 
sports receiving the most attention In Its columns; to- 
gether with Agricultural and Dairying Departments, 
under whose headings especial attention Is paid to the 
breeding, etc., of Cattle, Sheep, Hogs, Poultry, and all 
other animals connected with stock raising. 

As an advertising medium to Racing Associations, 
Horsemen, Stock Breeders, Manufacturers of Sulkies, Car- 
riages, Wagons, Agricultural and Dairying implements 
and Machinery, Sporting Goods, Fanciers, Stock Foods, 
and all others desiring to bring their wares to the atten- 
tion of the classes to whose interests the paper Is devoted 
within the field mentioned above, the BREEDER AND 
SPORTSMAN will be found Indispensable. 



Harpers Weekly 

Six Months, 26 Copies, Regular Price $2.50 

At no time has it been so evident to Americans as now, 
that the most important thing In the lives of all of us is 
the progress of the European War. 

Next to your daily bread the war Interests you most 
vitally. It may even come to be the most Important part 
of your problem of living. 

The periodical of greatest fundamental Interest to you 
today Is the one that can best report those phases of the 
war that come closest to your country and you. 

Because of connections abroad and at home, HARPER'S 
WEEKLY is that publication. 

As a critical commentary that presents Inside facts. It 
Is the necessary bridge for intelligent readers between 
the dally newspaper and the monthly review. 

You want HARPER'S WEEKLY now. You can get It 
now on trial at a remarkable reduction. 



Send Now and Get Them Both 

THIS OFFER is made to all v^ho will send us $3.25 before January 31st, 1916, whether for extension of 
subscription, renewal of subscription or a new subscription. Address: 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



P. O. Drawer 447 



San Francisco, Cal. 



V 



Saturday, January 22, 1916] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



15 



WHEN YOU SEE 





these blemishes on your horses, remember we have shown and proven 
for over 20 years, that Save-The-Horse positively cures them. 

Doubt and fear never earned — or cured anything — and delay is costly. The Horse 
Cannot Cure Itself! Money Must be Spent! The Problem is, to SPEND WISELY. 

Save-the-Horse Does Not Blister 

Does Not Discolor or Destroy the Hair Nor Leave a Scar 

Horse works as usual. 

THE RESULT IS PERMANENT. 

"It's the Most Powerful Medicine I Ever Used," 
writes W. J. Stonesefer, Route 1, Keyniar, Md. 



Eevery bottle sold with Signed 
Contract to return monuy if 
remedy fails on Ringbone — 
Thoropin — ^Spavin — or Any 
Shoulder, Knee, Ankle, Hoof or 
Tendon Disease. 



Regardless of price or any other reason, Save-The- 
Horse is the cheapest remedy known. It goes 
through and through both bone and tissue — it 
works inside, not outside — and produces a cure 
that withstands every test. No blistering, .scar or 
loss of h;iir. Horse can work as usual — winter or 
sunnner. 



But write, describing your case and we will send our — 96-page illustrated 
Book — Sample Contract and Advice — All Free (to Horse Owners and Managers). 
Druggists Everywhere sell Save-The-IIor.;e with Contract, or sent by Parcel 

Post Prepaid. 

TROY CHEMICAL CO., BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 

D E. NEWELL, Agent, 80 Bayo Vista Ave., OAKLAND, CAL. 

SAVE-THE-HORSE is sold with Contract by Druggists and 
Dealers Everywhere or we send prepaid on receipt of price. 





W. E. 



Jogging Your Horses? 

Your stallions as well as your racinR prospects are sheddini; their 
coats, or have done so. and are susceptible to t lie « rather changes. 
Have on hand your "standby" — SPOHN'S COMPOUND. It has 
stood the test for seventeen years. All druggists sell it, or horse goods 
houses. Hottlc 'lO cents and $1. Dozen $.') and SIO. 

Chemists and Bacteriologists, Goshen, Ind., U. S. A. 
Chemis'.s and Bacteriologists, Goshen, Ind., U. S. A. 



Makes Them Sound SMITH'S WONDER WORKER Keeps Them Sound 

Allays fever and iDftalcniation at once, this must be done to elTecl a cure. 
UNEXCELLED AS A REMEDY for bone and bog spavins, curbs, splints, ringbones, 
capped hocks, shoe bolls, wind puffs, thoroughpins and bunches of all kinds, liowed. 
strained and ruptured tendons, shoulder, nip and stKle lameness, weak joints, 
sweeny, cording up, throat trouble and rheumatism. Kelleves pains and soreness 
without loss of hair or a day's let up. As a leg and body wash It has no equal. In- 
vigorates and restores the distressed horse between beats and after bard workouts. 
Pric» $2.00 p*T betlU, prtpaid on receipt of price, f 16.00 per dox.; $10.00 per gal. 

DETEL8, PleaBanton Cal., Dltt-lbutlng Agent, for the Pacific Co«»l. 

W. K. SMITH & CO., Tiffin, Ohio. 



LIFE WITH THE TROTTER" price $3.00 postpaid 



NKW EDITION OF 
JOHN SPLAN'8 BOOK 

"Uf* With the Trotter" rives us a clear Insight Into the ways and means to be 
adopted to Increase pace, and preserve It when obtained. This work Is raplsta with 
Interest, and should be read by all sections of society, as It InciJcatas the doctrines oS 
kindness to the horse from start to finish." 



Address, 
P»clfle Bide. 



BREEDER and SPORTSMAN. P. 
Cor. Market and Fourth Bta. 



O. Drawer 447, ilaa lYajialMO. Oal 



S. IV. Dixon 



Frank Davey, 

Cutter 



Exclusive Tailors 
to Men 

=IMPORTERS OF 

HIGH -CLASS WOOLENS 

BANKERS INVESTMENT BUILDING 
Rooms WS and W7 

Til Market St Oeary St. 

HEALD'8 
BUSINESS COLLEGE 

trains for Buslnaaa and placaa Ka grad- 

uataa In poaltlona. 
121B Van Naaa Avonua, tan Franelaea 

BLAKE MOFFIT 6 TOWNE 



DEALERS 
IN 



PAPER 



>7-1at St., San Francisco. Cal. 
Blaka, McFall * Co., Portland. Ore 
Blaka, Mofflt and Town*. Iam AnceJea 



GUNCRAFT 



By W. A. Hruetto 



A modern 
treatise on guns, 
^ 0^ fittings am- 

,^ . Tnunitionf wing 

and trap shoot- 
ing. 

The theoretical side 
of the subject has been 
covered with a scientific 
accuracy which makes it 
an up-to-dale book of ref- 
crence, and the practical 
tide of wing shooting,, gun 
fitting, the mastereyc, dc- 
*^cctB in vision and other 
important questions have 
been treated in a way that 
will enable cither the ex- 
& pert or the amateur to de- 
termine if he is shooting with a gun that fits him and 
how to decide upon one that does. It will enable 
bim to ascertain why he misses some shots and is 
successful with others. The secrets of success in trap 
shooting, as well as the peculiarities in flight of the 
quail, the jacksnipc, the woodcock, the ruffed grouse, 
and the duck family, arc illustrated by drawings and 
described in a way that will facilitate the amateur in 
mastering the art of wing shooting. 

Cartridge board cover, $1.00; Cloth, $1.50 

BREEDER & SPORTSMAN, 
Post Office Drawer 447, San Francisco 




Five Thousand 
Gun Clubs Welcome You 



^7 IIEAliTV liaiulsake, a spirit of goodfcllowship 
and a sport that will give you a lu'w lease of 
life is offered you by 5000 gun cluhs tlirou.uli- 

out the country. 



TRAPSHOOTING 



i.s at its be.st and there's a club 
rislit in your own town where 
you can slioot to your heart's 
content. Look it up. Get in the 
game — the game that makes 
better citizens. 

WRITE FOR SPORT ALLURING 
BOOKLET 



E.I. du Pont 
de Nemours 
& Company 

Wilmington, Del. 

BRANCHES: 

KAN FRANCI.SCO: 
Ninth Floor Chronicle Bldg. 
DENVKR: 

Central Savings Bank T3\dg. 
SEATTLE: 

Maynartl Buililiiig 




TLlrd Edition Within One Year of Pub- 
licatiou. 

CARE AND TRAINING OF 
TROHERS AND PACERS 

NEVER before In tlie bistory of the 
imblisblug world lias a horse book 
none info a tlilrd edition within one 
year of lAiliIicntlon. Yet the explanation 
is siniplc — the book Alls a lonc-fclt want. 

Never before has tills suliject been 
treated In a distinct innnncr. It has been 
handled In connection witli antobiographies 
of trainers, bnt such worlds are out of 
print or out of date, for they were piil>- 
lisiit'd 20 years or more ago. Conditions 
and metliods have chanKcd since then, 
and former treatises are Just 03 much 
out of date aa the high-wheel sulkiea 
tiien In vogue. 

"Care and Training of Trotters and 
Pacers" is as modern as a 42-centlnieter 
Kun. It does not contain tlie Ideas o( 
one man, bnt of 100 of tlic leading horse- 
men of tlie liny, including TI:omas W. 
Murphy, Walter It. Cox, and Edward K. 
(Jeers, 'i'hese Ideas were converted into 
lionk form by two prominent American 
turf journalists. 

This iiook enables anyone to do his own 
caretaking and training until It Is time 
to send tlie colt to a professional trainer, 
or the o«ner can train and ror-e tlie colt 
himself. The treatise covers the details 
of n colt's life from the moment it Is 
foaled until after Its llrst year's cam- 
paign. Tlie facts are clearly presented. 
Notliing Is left to guess work. The lan- 
guage Is lucid. Holh tiieoretlcal and 
practical views ore outlined and com- 
pared. The Instructions are concise and 
easily understood. The work contains no 
odverllsenients — It is not n catch-penny 
piililliation that looks big in the adver- 
tisement but proves disappointing when 
received. 

.Many professional trainers hove pur- 
chased the Imok ond have found It In- 
teresting. Despite the war, over 300 
copies kave bewi sold In Eurojie ond Aus- 
tralia. 

Price $1.00 po«tp»ld. Cloth, 

- iUuatratcd, 176 pages, (z7 Inchoi. ^IZZ 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

366 Pacific Bldg., San Francisco, Cal 
or Post Office Drawer 447 



ALL CUTS 
IN THIS PUBLICATION MADE BY 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PHOTO -ENGRAVING CO. 

215 LEIDESDORFF ST., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Sutter 5398 



ABSORBINE 

f*- ^TRADE MARK MG.U.S.PAT. OFF. 



reduce inflanietl, swollen 
Joints, Sprains, Bruises, Soft 
I Bunches; Heals Bolls, Poll 
Evil, Ou'ttor, Fistula, or 
any unhealthy sore 

quickly 39 It is a posiiivc aniiirpde 
and germicide. Pleasant to use; doeS 
not blister under bandage or re- 
more tbe bair and you can work 
the borsc. *2 00 per botUe, ilellT-. 
ered. Book 7 K free. 
ABSORRINE. JR.. antiseptic liniment tor mankind. 
Reduced Painful, Swollen Veins. Goitre. Wen«, Straini, 
Bruises, stops pain and inflammation. I'rice tl. 00 per bottle 
•t dealert or delivered. Will (ell you more If you write. 
Manufacturcd.only by 

W. F. VOUNG, P. 0, F,, 54 Temple St, Springfield, Mast. 

For Bale by LfinRlny & MlchRel*. Han FrRnctBcc. Cullr.; 
Wooduftrd, Clark & Co , Portland Ore , CaI r^niit A Ctiem 
Co., Brunswl.it Prutt Co., Wett4rn Wholesale Diuff Co . Loi 
Aneelea, Call. Kirk. Cleory & Co., Sacramento, Calif ; 
P&clllc Drag. Co., Seattle, Wash.; Spokane Dni^ Co.. Spc 
kane, Wtuli.; Oftffln, Redioston Co., Ban Franclaco, OaL ^ 




HOUSEHOID SUPPLIES:- 

"•mith's Pay the Freight"— to reduce the 
liiKli I'ost 111 livinR. solid (iir (iiir Wholrsali' to 
Cotistimor t.'otiiloKiic. .•^initli's Ciish Store. 110-H 
• lay .Street. .San Francisco. 



Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalzlel 

Every fRclllty to give the beat of pio- 
fKenlonal grrvlres to all cnnea ot veterlu- 
ary (li^nttatry. Complicated caaea treated 
sucreB.sfiilly. Calls from out of town 
promptly reapondnd to. 

The beat work at reasonable prioaa 

IRA BARKER OALZIEL 
MO Fulton St. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm .F. EGAN. V.M.R.C.S. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 
116B Qolden Gate Ave. 
Branch HoapltAl, corner Wabatar und 
Cheatnut Btr««ta 

•an Franolsoo, Cal. 



i 



THE OFFICIAL HIGH AMATEUR AVERAGE 




FOR THE YEAR 1915 

WAS WON BY MR. WOOLFOLK HENDERSON, OF LEXINGTON, KY., USING 



Wt&B SHELLS 

He Shot at 2800 Registered Targets, Broke 2731; Percentage .9753 

Woolfolk Henderson "'"'^^ HIGHEST YEARLY AMATEUR AVERAGE ON RECORD. 

The wonderful record of Mr. Henderson in 1914, when he won the Four great amateur lionors, is still fresh in the minds of the shooting frater- 
nity. In that year he captured the Grand American Handicap, the Single Target and Double Target Championships of the United States and the 
High Amateur Average. His performance in 1915 is therefore but the continuation of a marvelous and thoroughly consistent record, made 
possible by ammunition of superlative quality. 

PETERS SHELLS have been used by the winner of the United States Hight Amateur Average (official) FIVE OUT OF THE PAST SIX YEARS 

THE PETERS CARTRIDGE CO., Pacific Coast Branch, 585-587 Howard Street, San Francisco. Cal. 



C. G. Spencer 



Ihe Big Winner In 1915 

The Interstate Association's Official High Professional Average for the season of 1915 was won by 
Charles G. Spencer, of St. Louis, Mo., with the marvelous record of 97.5% for 5620 targets. Such an 
average for such a large number of targets not only shows Mr. Spencer's great skill, but also proves the 
uniform and unequalled qualitv of 

W/ATC/fUTM 

LOADED SHELLS AND SHOTGUNS 

which Mr. Spencer used exclusively. It was this same combination that he used when he made his mar- 
velous straight run of 565 targets — the World's Record. 

Contests for the Season's Trapshooting Averages have been held 16 times and 12 of them have been won by 
yy shells or guns, or both, which is undeniable evidence of their superiority. 

Lester German, of Aberdeen, Md., who was second high for the season, and who also made the greatest score of 
the year for a single tournament — 499 x 500 — used Winchester shells in perfoniiing this great feat. 

J. Mownell Hawkins, of Baltimore, Md., shot 7,265 targets in competition during 1915, and made the splendid 
average of 95.56%, using Winchester shells and shotguns exclusively — more proof of their uniform shooting quali- 
ties. These perft)rnianccs .show the reason why WinchesliT .shell.s and guns are 

PREFERRED AND USED BY MEN OF ACHIEVEMENT 




NORTH DAKOTA Charles Brewer, Fargo. Secretary of the North Dakota Game and Fish 
_ _ Board of Control, writes: "For a number of years 1 have used Rcmrngton 

guns of different grades, and Reminpton-DMC shells. I find them an excellent 
combination, possessing high penetration and killing power. 
I can cheerfully recommend them both as being satisfactory in every respect." 



OHIO Harry R. Comstock, Tiffin, well-known Ohio sportsman. Prcsirlent of his local gun club 
Conniuniiy BatiM ^"'^ V ICC -President of the Ohio Trap Shooters' League, writes: "Have used nearly 
A«««afB( «iiK th« alt makes of shotguns, doubles and repeaters,, but maintain that wht-n I want to makc 
Winnint Combintiion the bcst scofc at the traps or on ducks, I always pin niy faith to the good old Remington 
Pump r,un and .ii drams of powder in the -Arrow or Nitro Club snclls. With this combination my gun will 
consistently lii-tter 76'"'f, an average 1 have never been able to make with my 
other guns. This speaks for itself." 



OKLAHOMA F. V. Fisher, of the Capital Gun Club, Oklahoma City, writes: "I have l>cen using 
"Th»t Sterl Linin ""^ Remington Pump Gun at every tournament and locally, for the past se\cn 
Sur«- Makci"*"*^ years, and I honestly believe it is better to-day than when it left the factory. I 
Difference" nevcr saw a gun like it. In hunting along the Canadian River, sand at times blows 

) h.ird tli.ii .1 man has to hunt cover. W hen other guns hang and clog with sand my Remington is always 
id in seven years has never hung, stuck, or failed to fire a shell. I never shoot any other, 
rjr Nitro Club shells. I find them more uniform, and I think a harder shooting shell than 



lings 



akes a dilTcrence.' 



OREGON Henry F. Wihlon, champion trapshooter, Cresham, writes: "I have used a ReminB- 
ton Pump and Nitro Club shells for the past two years, and find them very satisfactory. 
Aiiribuj.. SucccM I won tl\c State Shoot in May, the Interstate Championship. ., 

CombiMiilin' the Hom-yman State Championship, and Chingren trophy. I J 
-ittributc my success to the Remington- L'.MC combination." ^ 
PFNN«;YI VAIMIA C- A- Jobson, of the Lock H.ivcn Cnn Club, Lock Haven, writes: "The first 
r Cl-ci-i J 1 i-Y rtiiiM ^^^^^ import.int step along the route to success in sh.iotinK is the selection 

o /- . •> ^ ..< of the gun ami ammunition, whether it be for big game hunting, tr.ipshootmg, 
100 P.r Cent. Perfect ^^^^^ practice-all that is, or can be desired, is found in the Kcmington-UMC 

Red Ball combination. Your creation of the llammerless, solid breech, bottom ejection Pump Cure puts 
into the hands of sportsmen the best Pump Gun ever made, either for trap- or field shoolmg, while the uni- 
formity and effecliveness of the Arrow and Nitro Club shells make them the standard shotgun ammuni- 
tion of^the age. To try this combination means that the consistent user will alwaysstick to 
it, and the better he becomes acquainted with your goods, the more he w ill be pleased with _^wlrl~r-i_ 
• his choice. 1 consider Remington arms and ammunition as nearly nx>' perfect as it is jp^ 
possible to manufacture, and it gives me great pleasure to recommend them." 

' PUOnr IQI ANn Arthur S. Lippack, of Providence, writes: "I have been using one of your Pump 
t\n\ju^ loi^rtiiiy j,^^^ i^^j years, and think it is the finest duck and trap gun I have 

i HuiJIo. AH M Jce. ever owned. During this time I have used all kinds of loads and makes of shells 
I of Shell. and have never found one that your Pump would not handle. I h.ive owned 

1 three other makes of pumps, and have never had one besides the Remington that 
«ould do this." iOi^jr^iL^ 



PAGES 18 AND 19, FOR INSTANCE — DO YOU WANT THEM All? 

Here is a booklet of shooting and liunting talks by one representative sportsman in each State from 
Maine to California. A complete story in forty-nine chapters — some of the chapters by men you know — 
all by nationally or internationally known sportsmen.. 

If you are a beginner at the shooting sport, here is Experience ready-made for you, without cost. If 
you're a veteran, you'll want to compare notes with these "Been There" Brother Sportsmen — good fellows all. 
A postal card will bring your free copy of "LittleTalks With Sportsmen From Coast to Coast." 

REMINGTON ARMS-UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 
Woolworth Building (233 Broadway) New York City 



Paramount Parker Guns 



Look, 



Read. 



Mr. Wodlfulk ni-n(U-r.«>n. .'in aiii.-ilour. b.v scoring .'Jl'y.'.'r made tlie 

HIGHEST OFFICIAL GENERAL AVERAGE FOR 1915 

Mr. Le.ster German, a profe.«.«ionaL by .'scorinff .!l7429o made 

SECOND OFFICIAL GENERAL AVERAGE FOR SAME PERIOD 
CLEAN SWEEP ON DOUBLE TARGETS 
Messrs. Guy V. DeriiiK. S. A. HiinlUy and WiKilfolk Henderson won 

FIRST, SECOND and THIRD, 
respectively, by scoring 'jmif/c, SCGtj'i and SKuk;,. 

THE WORLD'S RECORD!!! 
At Atlantic City Sept. 15 to 17 Mr. I^cster Gt rman broke all Tournament 
Reccrds by scoring 647 OUT OF 650 TARGETS, with one run of 372 
straiglit. which is longest for the year. 

PARKER GUNS have won the tJrand American Handicap 9 times out of 
25 offers, once with 100 straight, only time made. Also 7 out of 9 Inter- 
state Championship Kvents with highest scores ever made, twice with 
198 X 200 at 18 yards rise. 

PARKER PACIFIC COAST RECORDS 

In California Mr. Henry Pfirnnann won the Pacific Coast Handicap and 
Mr. J. Foster Coiits won the Championship of California. 
In Portland, Oregon, Mr. P. H. O'Brien by scoring 241 straight made the 
record for the Pacific Coast. 
If interested in small bore guns write for instructive booklet which will be sent free 
on reqtie.>ii. For furllicr part icvilars regarding guns from 8 to 28 gauge, address 
PARKER BROS., Merlden, Conn. New York Salesroom, 32 Warren Street; 

or A. W. duBray, Residing Agent, San Francisco, P. O. Box 102 



Remember 



TRAINING THE HOUND 



A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON THE TRAINING OF FOX HOUNDS, BEAGLES, 

AND COON HOUNDS. 

The system of training advocated is simple and effective, so that anyone who car- 
ries out instructions can easily develop a foxhound, a beagle or a coon dog to the 
highest state of usefulness or organize a pack in which each hound will work independ- 
ently and at the same time harmoniously with the others. The subjects are: The 
Hound's Ancestry, History. Instinctive Tendencies. English and Native Hounds, Devel- 
oping the Intelligence, Training the Foxhound, Voices and Pace of the Hound, Quali- 
ties of Scent. Manners, Training the Coon Dog, Coon Hunting, Training the Beagle, 
Forming a Pack, i'ield Trial Handling, Faults and Vices, Conditioning, Selecting and 
Rearing Pvippies. Kennels and Yards, Diseases of Hounds and Their Treatment. The 
chapters on field trial training and handling are alone worth the price of the book, 
which is one that every man who loves the voice of a hound should read. 

The book contains 224 pages, is clearly printed, nicely bound, and handsomely illus- 
trated with bloodhounds, various types of English and American foxhounds, beagles 
and cross-bred dogs for 'possum and coon hunting. 

Price, in heavy paper cover, $1; $1.50, postpaid. 

ADDRESS: 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

p. O. DRAWER 447, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




VOLUME LXVIII. No. 5. SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAV ' VNUARY 29, 1916. SubscripUon— 13.00 Per Year 




2 



THb iJREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 29, 1916. 



$3,000 



GUARANTEED 



ONLY $2." TO NOMINATE MARE 



GUARANTEED 




Pacific Breeders Futurity Stal(es No. 16 

TO BE GIVEN BY THE 

Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association 

For Foals of Mares Covered In 1915 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old 

Entries Close February t, 1916 



$3,000 



$1600 for Trotting Foals. 
$150 to Nominators of Dams of Winners 



$1100 for Pacing Foals 
$100 to Owners of Stallions 




$700 for Three-Year-Old Pacers. 

50 to the Nominator of the Dam on whose Original Entry is named the Winner of 
Three-Year-Old Pace. 
400 for Two-Year-Old Pacers. 
25 to the Nominator of the Dam on whose Original Entry Is named the Winner of 

Two-Year-Old Pace-. 
50 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three- Year-Old Pace when 
was bred. 



Mare 



1916; 



$1000 for Three-Year-Old Trotters. 

50 to the Nominator of Ihe Dam on whose Original Entry is named the Winner of 
Three-Year-Old Trot. 
600 for Two-Year-Old Trotters. 
25 to the Nominator of the Dam on whose Original Entry Is named the Winner of 
Two-Year-Old Trot. 

50 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when Mare 
was bred. 

SPECIAL CASH PRIZES FOR STALLION OWNERS. 

Given to Owners of Stallions standing highest in number of Mares nominated in this Stake that were bred to their respective horses, divided as follows: 

FIRST PRIZE, $35; SECOND PRIZE, $15. 

Th* Above Prizes will be Paid on February 20ih, 1916 

ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS — ^$2 to nominate mare on February 1. 1916; when name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given; $5 August 1 
$10 on Yearlings January 1, 1917; $10 on Two-Year-Olds January 1, 1918; $10 on Three-Year-Olds January 1. 1919. 

STARTING PAYMENTS.— $25 to start in the Two-Year-Old Pace; $35 to start in the Two-Year-Old Trot; $35 to start in the Three-Year-Old Pace; $50 to start in the 
Three-Year-Old Trot. All Starting Payments to be made ten days before the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 

Nominators must designate when making payments to start whether the horse entered is a Trotter or Pacer. 

Colts that start at Two Years Old are not barred from starting again in the Three-Year-Old Divisions. 

CONDITIONS: 

The races for Two-Year-Olds will be mile heats, 2 In 3, not to exceed three heats, a. id if not decided in two heats, will be finished at the end of Ihe third heat and money 
divided according to rank in the summary; and for Three-Year-Olds — three heats, money divided 25 per cent to the first heat, 25 per cent to the second heat, 25 per cent to the 
tnird heat, and 25 per cent to lhe race according to rank in the summary. Money in each division 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. Should two or more horses be tied for first 
place at the completion of the third heat, such horses only shall contest in a fourth heat and money divided according lo rank in the summary at the termination of that heat. 
A horse having won the first two heats and drawn or distanced in the third heat shall net lose position in the summary. Distance for Two-Year-Olds, 150 yards; for Three- 
Year-Olds, 100 yards. 

If a mare proves barren or slips or has a dead foal or twins; or if either the mare or foal dies before January 1, 1917, her nominator may sell or transfer his nomination or 
substitute another mare or foal, regardless of ownership; but there will be no return of a payment, nor will any entry be liable for more than amount paid in or contracted for. 
In entries, the name, color and pedigree of mare must be given; also the name of the horse to which she was bred in 1915. 

Entries must be accompanied by entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $3000, the amount of the guar- 
antee, only. 

Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacing divisions. 

Right reserved to declare oft or reopen these Stakes in case the number of entries received is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors. 
Money divided in each division of the Stake 50. 25, 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division or heat than there are starters. 
Entries open to the world. Membership not required to enter; but no horses, wherever owned, will be allowed to start until the owner has become a member. 

Write for Entry Blanks to 

P. HEALD, F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 

President. P. O. Drawer 447. 366 Pacific Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



E. 



Pedigrees Tabulated 

— =Typewntten, Suitable For Framing = 
Registration Standard-Bred Horses Attended to 

Stallion Service Booiis, $1.00 
Stallion Folders 

with picture of the tiorse and terms on first page; complete tabulated pedigree 
on the two inside pages and description on back page 

Stallion Cards for Posting 

size, one-half sheet, 14x22; size one-third sheet, 11x14 

Stallion Cards 

two sides, size 3^ x 6>^, to fit envelop 
ADDRESS 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



366 PACIFIC BLDG. 
I SAN PRANCI8CO. 



Saturday, January 29, 1916.1 



xHE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
Turf and Sporting Authority on the Pacific Coast. 
(Established 1882.) 
Published every Saturday. 
F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACFIC BUILDING 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts.. San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
National Newspaper Bureau, Agent, 219 East 23rd St., 

New York City. 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco P. O. 



Terms — One year, $3; six months, $1.75; three months, $1. 

Foreign postage $1 per year additional; Canadian postage 
50c per year additional. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or regis- 
tered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 
447, San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



THE IVIUTUALS AND MR. SPLAN. 



At various times in the last year or so we have pre- 
sented ideas of our own or better men favoring the 
adoption of the pari-mutual machine as the sole 
medium for wagering on horse races, either in har- 
ness or under saddle, and now take pleasure in sub- 
mitting an excellent view of the same system from 
one of the most widely known horsemen in the world, 
John Splan of Patchen Wilkes Farm. "The Only" 
was the storm center of many a spirited discussion 
of matters relating to the welfare of the trotting turf 
at the recent meeting of the stewards of the Grand 
Circuit in Cleveland, and when the subject of betting 
rolled around for consideration, he arose and ex- 
pressed himself as follows: 

"Since mutuals w-ere made the sole system of bet- 
ting at Kentucky runnig tracks, even some ministers 
are known to play their favorite horses. Now let me 
tell how I and some of my old cronies do when we 
feel like taking an afternoon off from daily cares of 
work and business to spend it at a running meeting. 
I take out a ten-dollar bill and divide it in five twos. 
One I set aside for expenses and hold the four bills 
to bet on four races. 

"When I get to the track and buy a score card, I 
pick up my four choices, as do my friends. We 
plunge as the races come. If we land one winner we 
are about even on the day, as any winning bet, espe- 
cially for place or show, gives fair returns, but if 
all is lost, we have had a whole afternoon's outing, 
recreation, amusement and excitement, for you see, 
we practically owned four horses in four of the races, 
while the entire cost was only $10. 

"Now, for my day's vacation I paid a little some- 
thing to the train man who took me to the races, 
handed a dollar or so at the gate to help along the 
man who offered me the chance to amuse myself. 
The good people will say, 'Well, how about the $8 
you lost?' 

"I will tell you what became of it. Another good, 
honorable and law-abiding citizen who was there for 
the same recreation and enjoyment I was after made 
a better selection and took away $7.50 of my money, 
while the 40 cents went to cover the expenses of the 
man who handled the mutuals, so I could have some 
excitement and think myself as owner of four horses 
that I told you before. 

"But the dear, good man — the reformer — on the 
other hand, puts me down and the fellow who earned 
my $7.60 as a criminal for betting on horses, and let 
me tell you that he considers himself perfectly justi- 
fied by placing me outside of the pale of decent citi- 
zenship even in this age of common sense and liberal 
ideas. Is he justified? Surely not, and I can tell 
him why. 

"The man who won or earned my money was as 
much entitled to it as my tailor is to what he earns 
by making me a suit of clothes, the butcher and 
grocer who furnish my daily food, and the landlord 
who gives me a comfortable bed to sleep on in a 
warm room. As I said, the man who handled my $8 
kept 40 cents. I knew this, and he did it as honestly 
and openly as the profit my tailor made in a straight, 
honest and businesslike manner. The man at the 
gate to whom I paid my dollar or so furnished just 
what I wanted and more, and later when I met him 
and his associates it did not take me long to be con- 
vinced that they were as fine a group of gentlemen as 
I had met among any other business and profession. 

"They tell us that mutual betting is as much gam- 
bling as bookmaking, yet such statements indicate 
ignorance, as under this system you know just what 



you get in return for your investment and are no 
more dealing with a professional gambler than when 
treating your friends to a meal or some refreshment. 
You are simply paying men just what they are enti- 
tled to for serving you and waiting on you. 

"You also have the satisfaction of knowing that 
your fellow citizen who earned your money — mind 
you, I don't say 'won,' because he took no advantage 
of me — was wise enough to choose a butcher who 
could supply better steaks for his meals than the one 
I had — he picked the better horse, and therefore en- 
joyed our mutually favorite amusement more than 
I to some extent. He neither cheated me nor took 
the least advantage of me. 

"No man witii any knowledge of or experience w'ith 
racing can fail to admit that almost 100 per cent, of 
the knocks the sport has received in this country — it 
has never been damaged by other civilized peoples — 
has been due solely to the system of bookmaking, a 
feature against which much can be said, but which 
has absolutely not one redeeming aspect or excuse 
to have ever become an adjunct to the greatest and 
most enjoyable outdoor sport, pastime and recreation 
for humanity from time immemorial — the speed con- 
test among the choicest and swiftest horses man has 
bred for ages. 

"The sportsmen in charge of big line harness racing 
have done much for its present and future advance- 
ment and there are sure indications for more in the 
future, yet in my judgment none will benefit the turf 
and breeding industry more than the total elimination 
of bookmaking and adoption of the mutual system, 
the same as is the custom all over the civilized 
world." 

o 

TALKING IT OVER WITH VERNON. 



If there is anytliing in this world for which I have 
less use than a hair brush it is a rainy day around 
a race track, so when I landed at Pleasanton Driving 
Park last Saturday in the rain I was up against it. 
Making a very extensive round of the stables was 
clearly out of the question, so I decided that about 
as good a thing as I could do to pass away the time 
would be to drop around and have a little talk with 
my old friend Vernon McKinney, whom I really 
hadn't seen to speak to since 'way along in the sum- 
mer. I had been reading in a number of eastern 
exchanges that he was going to emigrate to Canada, 
or had already done so, and I wanted to see what 
he had to say about the matter. I found him very 
comfortably fixed up for a rainy day in the old famil- 
iar quarters in the first row of stalls at the Mac- 
Kenzie plant, just picking his teeth after having 
had a very enjoyable sort of a lunch. 

"Well, well, vvell," he chuckled as I stepped into 
the stall and shut the lower part of the door to keep 
out a raw wind, "look what the high water brought 
down! Say, you are quite a stranger, ain't you? If 
you wasn't looking for a stud ad you wouldn't be 
here now, I don't suppose, but sit down and stay 
awhile, anyway. A horse likes to have green things 
come in the spring, and God knows there's a whole 
lot of 'em that ain't grass." I let that sink in for 
a minute and then I told him about what the eastern 
papers said about him and Canada. He was peeved 
something awful. 

"Where do them guys get that noise, anyway?" he 
snorted, after I had explained the situation to him. 
"Canada? Why should I go to Canada? Of course, 
if Rod needed me up there I'd just as soon go as not, 
but he already sent for Joe and Quintell, and they 
ought to be enough. I ought to stay here in Cali- 
fornia for awhile yet, anyway. You see, now that 
grandpaw has been gone down east for such a long 
time and is beginning to get old, California sort of 
seems more than ever like the place where I ought 
to live always. You see, I am the fastest member of 
our whole family. Uncle Coney and Aunt Sweet 
Marie being the only ones of paw's folks to go any- 
where near my clip, while none of my cousins has 
ever got down to it yet either, and this, as well as 
having a few kids of my own growing up, has give 
me a feeling of responsibility that I didn't have at 
all in them happy days back up at Stockton when I 
was going to school to Willis Parker. I used to 
get out and hell around and go down the Grand (Mr- 
cuit and all them sort of things that a feller In my 
line does befor(> he knows any different, but now I 
don't ask anything better than to stay here at home 
and watch my kids grow up. 

"Take into consideration the number of our family 
that used to live here in California and there ain't 



such a lot of us left now, at that. Of course there 
are several uncles of mine still sticking around out 
here and all giving good accounts of themselves, 
and I've got a few cousins here that are making a 
name in the world, like that boy Wilbur down there 
at Hemet, and him and me both are going to be led 
a dog's life by them flyaway kids of ours, I'm afraid. 
One of his boys is here on this track now, and tiiey 
say he is the hot-dog speed burner of all these Cali- 
fornia two-year-old trotters, and while my boys ain't 
bothering me so much I've got a girl or .so that are 
plumb pests. That Verna thing that lives down 
there back of the Rose Hotel, now, they tell me is 
the fastest skirt of her age and gait in this whole 
country, but you got to give her some allowances. 
Her half-brother, Del Rey, used to be a wolf on 
wheels when the price was right, and then around 
a hotel is a mighty poor place to raise a girl if you 
want to keep her one of these sedate slow pokes 
that never gets out of a Sunday School jog. Believe 
me. Bill, I didn't race all over the country without 
learning some things, not me. 

"So I reckon jou just better break it easy to them 
folks down east that writes about me being in Can- 
ada to forget it, as California looks pretty good to 
me right now and always has. Now that I've been 
back home here regular for the last two or three 
years I'm getting a pretty wide circle of friends, 
especially among the ladies, and all of these things 
add to the comforts of home. Christmas and New 
Y'ears I got a lot of cards from girls that I've met that 
said they would drop in and see me along during the 
spring, and I'd hate to have any of them disap- 
pointed. I get my mail here regular and am going 
to continue to do so if anybody asks you, and if 
nobody asks you you can tell 'em anyway. You fix 
me up in that paper and send the bill to Rod. Going? 
Well, that's the way with you guys. I allowed you 
would as soon as you got the ad order. 

"Well, drop around any time, and remember me 
to any of my friends that you run across, and say, 
when you go past the end room up there stop in and 
tell that big stiff DeRyder to have the boys dig me 
up some better hay now that I'm going to have my 
name in print again regularly; this last bale is 
stemmy as hell!" and he shut the door and I was out 
in the rain again. 

o 

THE MORGAN REGISTER. 



We have recently received through the courtesy of 
the American Publishing Company, Middlebury, Ver- 
mont, of which concern the late Joseph Battell was 
the guiding spirit. Volume Number Three of the 
American Morgan Register, the accepted official pub- 
lication which performs for the Morgan horse the 
same service that is rendered the trotter by the 
American Trotting Register and the thoroughbred by 
the American Stud Book. Many Morgan horses are 
also standard trotters, and the needs of breeders in 
the main are served by the trotting register, but for 
the man who specializes in producing the horse of 
the family founded generations ago by Justin Morgan 
in the Vermont hills, the American Morgan Register 
will be found indispensable. The same care is given 
to its preparation that characterizes the compilation 
of its Iwndred works, so that full dependence may be 
placed in all statements made and pedigrees pre- 
sented, and the work is further enhanced by the 
numerous photographic likenesses of famous Morgan 
horses which appear at frequent intervals through- 
out its pages. The price of Volume Three is five 
dollars, and the publication may be ordered direct 
or through this office by breeders who desire to add 
it to their library. 



NEW AUSTRALASIAN RECORD. 



The Australasian record of 2:08 3-5 held jointly by 
King Cole and Emmeline was lowered materially 
some days since over the Metropolitan course at 
Addlngton, New Zealand, by the seven-year-old mare 
Country Belle, who established new figures of 
2:07 1-5. She was driven in the great performance 
by her breeder and owner, J. W. Moreland, and was 
accompanied by the pacemaker Kingsway, ridden by 
Freeman Holmes, who has many friends on this side 
the water. Later she was sent for the two-mile 
record and annexed this as well, going the double 
distance strongly in 4:22 4-5, a reduction of Denver 
Ihion's mark by nearly six seconds. The new cham- 
pion is a daughter of Wild Moor and Bonnie Belle 
by Lincoln Yet, a son of Irvlngton. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 29, 1916. 



Looking Over the Horses qf W. G. Durfee 

BEING TIIK LAST OF THE LOS ANCELES VISITS 



For about two weeks now I have been dragging 
you folks around in the mud at Exposition Park, Los 
Angeles, trying to give you an idea of the trotters 
and pacors that arc being wintered there, and to the 
best of my knowledge and belief we have seen about 
all of them except a few carloads in the stable of 
William G. Durfee. Since these Los Angeles stories 
began the colony there has been visited by one or two 
amateur floods, and I doubt if they have made much 
speed as yet, though some of the boys may have had 
a little practice in building skiffs or rafts. The drain- 
age in the immediate vicinity of Exposition Park is 
not the best in the world when taxed beyond a cer- 
tain limit, and I imagine that when that four and 
some odd fractions inches of water landed all at once 
a few days ago things became fairly damp both 
inside and outside the barns. However, no word of 
serious inconvenience to trainers or sickness to 
horses as a result of the visit of the storm king has 
been received here, and while the rain has persisted 
pretty steadily things down there have about gotten 
around to normal once more. The track gets In 
shape pretty rapidly when the sun once gets a fair 
shot at it, and while training operations have been 
considerably retarded ever since late in December 
the boys will soon make up for lost time when they 
once get to work in earnest. 

Last week we saw the horses of all the smaller 
strings, with the exception of those looked over the 
previous week, and the half dozen head that Durfee 
included in his first plans for a campaign down the 
big line this year. Will's horses are scattered through 
three stables and several paddocks, so if you will 
borro^y a pair of rubber boots from Little Henry or 
Big Kelley (according to the size of your underpin- 
ning) we will toddle around in tow of the deputy 
sheriff for a few moments and endeavor to get a 
line on the horses that he will probably leave here 
to race over the California circuit, as well as the 
band of young things from among which he will also 
make a strenuous endeavor to produce the winners 
of the local futurities in 1916, and the draft of babies 
whose active careers will not begin for another year 
or so but who are getting their first lessons in trot- 
ting and pacing now while their notions are yet in 
the formative period. 

Of the record horses which we have not seen there 
are an even half a score, mostly trotters and mostly 
four-year-olds or over, though four of the record 
holders yet have futurity engagements to fill as three- 
year-olds. Rags heads the trotting brigade both in 
point of age and performance, he being the only one 
of the delegation of this gait which we are inspecting 
this morning to possess a record faster than the 
2:10 mark. Always an overgrown sort of a colt, this 
fellow has developed into a veritable whale of a 
horse, big enough and husky enough to do the work 
of an ordinary drafter, from all appearances. He has 
been turned out all summer and came in for his 
winter work in excellent shape, sound and hearty and 
full of life. He has been a useful horse previously 
and Will has him set down for a lowered record this 
season. His brother in blood, Nicola B. (3) 2:18V^, 
winner of the Oregon Futurity as a two-year-old and 
contending trotter in the Panama-Pacific stake for 
three-year-olds at the June meeting, has also had a 
rest of several months and is growing into a nice 
sized horse, though not of such gargantuan propor- 
tions. They are bred quite similarly, one being by 
Del Coronado and the other by Carlokin, while their 
dam is the famous matron Atherine, dam also of 
Copa de Oro 2:01, etc. Bred as they are, it will be a 
matter of considerable interest to watch their future 
development along speed making lines, as a basis for 
comparison of the speed siring capacities of Carlokin 
and Del Coronado. At that, however, the test will 
not be an absolutely equable one, as both lads have 
had a bit of bad luck at one time or another, though 
neither shows signs of the same at present. 

Carl (3) 2:14yi, who made his record just before 
the close of the year and after he had practically 
been let down for the winter, would in all probability 
have trotted in 2:10 as a three-year-old with any sort 
of luck at all, but he was an unfortunate little scamp, 
running foul of minor troubles at different times 
through the season, none of them more than tempo- 
rary in nature but sufficiently annoying at the time 
to set him back quite a little. In his first races he 
was inclined to leave his feet for Durfee Senior, who 
had the mount behind him in his engagements, but 
later on he settled to his work like a real trotter and 
went some very nice races, being the most consist- 
ent of the fields that went down steadily before the 
prowess of AUie Lou. He was consigned to the 
Chicago sale along with the several others that went 
to that auction from the Durfee stable, but he was 
such an honest little fellow that his owner and trainer 
decided to give him another chance. At that he may 
be sold before the racing season rolls around, as 
various parties have made overtures for his purchase 
at private sale, and anything in the Durfee stable is 
let go when a \)rice is agreeable to all concerned. 
While Carl is the last of the produce of My Irene S. 
to be seen at the races, there is yet another member 
of the line in the stable at present with a record, 
the now three-year-old chestnut colt Manuelito (2) 
2:24V2, that broke into the list for the first time on 
the same day that witnessed Carl's last performance. 



Clarence Berry, who has not yet let any of the My 
Irene S. youngsters get away from him since he 
purchased Esperanza, paid Durfee a long price for 
this fellow when he was only a few days old and 
apparently has no grounds for regrets for the action. 
As a yearling, with the little education he received, 
Manuelito showed quite a turn of natural and early 
speed, but he began growing at such a rate that not 
much was done with him and he was put in the list 
last month more for the benefit of his dam than for 
the purpose of giving the public any line on his real 
quality. He is a nice color, smoothly turned, and to 
my way of thinking the making of a most attractive 
type of a trotting stallion. He is an upstanding 
fellow, with a nice crest, and a good head and eye — 
one that looks to have a lot of the things that com- 
bine to make the one word "quality." Whether he 
has that look about the head and eye that is the 
"birthright of eagles" and great horses, according 
to some critics. I am not prepared to say, but for a 
youth of his years he has a "presence" that gives 
you the idea that you are looking at a great colt. 

Byron (3) 2:l^yVi, who annexed most of the three- 
year-old money that got away from Allie Lou and 
Carl last season, has not yet begun to put on as much 
winter flesh as he might carry but he is rounding 
into nice shape gradually. He was the surprise of 
the stable as a two-year-old but did not do quite so 
well last season as was expected of him early in the 
season, but Will inclines to the idea that he will 
make an excellent trotter with a little maturity. 
Whether or not it is the intention of Mr. Erken- 
brecher to have him raced over the California tracks 
this season I am not aware, but he looks to me like 
a colt that would not only appreciate a year's let-up 
but one that would be considerably benefitted there- 
by. Miss Rico (2) 2:21i4, the Manrico— Subito filly 
that obtained her record in the race with Anvilite at 
the spring meeting at the exposition, has not made 
very much growth during the summer, but is a hardy 
looking thing and in excellent shape. She is the very 
first performer for her sire and I would not be sur- 
prised to see her break into the 2:10 list this season, 
as she has a lot of whizz. Last spring over the hard 
track at the big fair she was a little inclined to pace 
once or twice, but I don't hold that against her for a 
•minute, and she has demonstrated her real class as 
a baby speed marvel by trotting an eighth in four- 
teen and a half seconds. Hermes (2) 2:16V6, who 
represented for the stable in the fall stakes for the 
junior trotters, is another juvenile racer of much 
promise. He is a very late colt, having been foaled 
well along in the summer, and has made an excellent 
showing under all circumstances, being separately 
timed at Pleasanton in 2:15V4. He is a nicely put 
together lad, sound and smooth, and if he goes ahead 
and lives up to his early showing and his pedigree 
he will make quite a trot horse some of these days. 
He is by Carlokin and out of Miss Quealey, full sister 
to Manrico, a colt whom Messrs. Chandler, Geers, 
Cox, McMahon, Dickerson, Murphy, Andrews, Shank 
and some others may possibly recall as winner of the 
Kentucky futurity in 1912. 

Last but not least of the record trotters in the sta- 
ble is the gray gelding John Warwick (2) 2:17, whom 
Willie Durfee may possibly recall as the winner of 
the junior division of the Breeders' futurity here in 
California the following year, though the "recom- 
membrance" is perhaps more pleasing to one Charles 
A. Durfee, that being one of the most recent occa- 
sions upon which that gentleman had the pleasure of 
administering a decisive trimming to "that kid of 
mine." Warwick bears the distinction of being one 
of the two horses that ever put it over Esperanza 
during her career as a futurity trotter, Bon Courage 
being the other one, but he had a couple of seasons 
of idleness, owing to a bit of an injury to one of 
his rear propellers. He could have been trained and 
raced last season, but there was no especial call for 
his services and he was allowed to run on, coming 
up this winter with all traces of his former mishaps 
entirely removed. He is a real horse by all natural 
inclinations and early indications, and Will has him 
tagged as the coming gray ghost trotter of this gen- 
eration. His pedigree is a sturdy one that brings up 
memories of days gone by, being by Carlokin and 
out of Alameda Maid by Eros (sire of Dione 2:07i/i 
and the dams of Bernice R. 2:07^4 and The Roman 
2:0914), grandam Oakland Maid 2:22 by Speculation, 
great grandam Lady Vernon 2:29i/6, whom Chester 
credits with winning a number of races in the fifties 
and from whom comes the color carried by the pres- 
ent representative of the line, its descent through the 
dams mentioned having been unbroken. 

The record sidewheelers, aside from those previ- 
ously visited, are but two in number, and are rather 
"chestnutty" from the color standpoint, but they are 
of championship caliber, either world or season. 
Rayo de Oro (3) 2:07%, who broke the jinx that 
dogged the footsteps of the Copa de Oros whenever 
they set sail for a world's record over the Phoenix 
track, is putting on flesh in a very pleasing manner 
and has all the appearance of a gelding that will do 
to race either east or west, though he is hardly so 
rugged as his brother Pat, whom we visited some 
days ago in the Stewart stable and whose picture 
adorned our cover page last week. Rico (2) 2: 12 14, 
whose performances last season stamped him as the 



country's fastest pacing colt for the age for the 
moment, looks like a coming champion and is evi- 
dently so regarded by his new owner, Mr. Clarence J. 
Berry, as I refuse to tell you the price that Clarence 
put on him in answer to my query as to the same, I 
being of the opinion that he might prove a good 
horse for a certain friend of mine to own. Suffice it 
to say that the figures were of a proportion that 
augur well for the present and future market value of 
really good young things, and if I were Berry I would 
probably want about as much for him myself. He 
is husky as a stall fed steer of a like age, is sound 
as a piece of well seasoned oak, and has as much 
right to become a world beater as the next one. He 
is Manrico's second performer (the pair in the Dur- 
fee stable constituting that rising young sire's total 
representation to date) and his dam is a high strung 
daughter of Petigru and Subito, known as Pavlowa B. 
This mare is the first standard trotter bred by Mr. 
Berry, unless my ideas have slipped a cog some 
place, and while possessed of considerable trotting 
speed she had too much vinegar to make it of value, 
running away and cutting herself badly while being 
broken and never raced thereafter, though trialing 
close to 2:20. Rico has some notions that are not 
the most pleasing in the world and in his early work 
was inclined to be the boss of the tan yard in his 
own right, but he is getting over these little faults 
as he grows older and he races as well as any man's 
colt, being well behaved in company and game. There 
is a mighty warm bunch of three-year-old pacers to 
contest in this year's stakes, and this boy ought to 
be one of the warmest. There is one other pacer in 
the bunch that has a well developed turn of speed, 
a six or seven-year-old bay gelding by Del Coronado 
and out of Little Agnes (dam of Jupiter B. 2:12) by 
Gossiper. This fellow carries the Spanish appellation 
of Del Oeste (The Westerner) and has had a let-up 
of considerable duration, being now at a point at 
which William G believes he will stand training and 
racing. As a three-year-old he trialed in 2:09, and 
if he "comes back" and stands the gaff he will have 
been well worth carrying along. 

This tells the tale for the Durfee string insofar as 
record or developed horses are concerned, and the 
easiest way to get over the younger ones is to do 
it systematically, by ages, so we will start in with the 

THREE-YEAR-OLDS : 
Carina, bay filly by Carlokin — Atherine (dam of 
Copa de Oro, etc.) ; trotter, quarter last spring in 37 
seconds. 

Black gelding by Walter Barker 2:19V4, dam by 
Constantine 2:12^^, trotter, owned in Pasadena. 

TWO-YEAR-OLDS : 

Bay filly by Copa de Oro — Subito, pacer; Will 
remarked to me some months ago, shortly after the 
June meeting at the exposition, that this was the 
only poor foal that Subito ever had given birth to, 
but William's opinion at that time merely bears out 
the old time theory that it is impossible to tell merely 
by looking at a baby boy whether he is going to be 
a preacher, a prize fighter, a horse trainer or a law- 
yer. At any rate, that decision has been reversed 
and there is no bargain price tag hanging on the 
door of the stall occupied by this young lady. As a 
weanling and as a yearling she was a poor doer, but 
some weeks ago she began coming alive and is doing 
famously. She knows nothing but pace. 

Bay filly by Copa de Oro— Rita H. 2:12% (dam of 
Byron (3) 2:1^>%) by McKinney, double gaited but 
apparently a promising prospect when squared away 
for either gait; owned by Byron Erkenbrecher. 

Bay colt by Carlokin — Zephyr (dam of Virginia 
Barnette (3) 2:08',), not the biggest boy of his age 
in the world but horse all over. Will be a little more 
substantial than Virginia, and will trot. A late foal. 

Brown colt by Crescendo B. trial 2:12% (brother 
to Copa de Oro 2:01), dam by Zombro 2:11, a trotter; 
owned by E. E. Sherwood, Strathmore, Cal. 

Bay filly by Crescendo B., dam a sister to White 
Sox 2:0.'i%, a pacer; owned by Mr. Sherwood, who 
also owns her sire and her dam, the latter being at 
present in foal to Carlokin. 

Chestnut fllly by Copa de Oro — Pavlowa B. (dam 
of Rico (2) 2: 12 14) by Petigru 2:10%; contrary to 
what might be expected at first thought, this lass is 
a very nice trotter, rather than a pacer. 

Bay colt (full brother to Chango (3) 2:12i4) by 
Copa de Oro — Lady H. by Del Coronado; a pacer 
that will probably represent for the stable in this 
year's juvenile events, as he is at present considered 
the real goods. 

Troubadour, bay colt (full brother to Esperanza 
(3) 2:09), by Carlokin— My Irene S. by Petigru; a 
substantial fellow from whom the Durfee-Berry com- 
bination expects a good deal in the future. He is a 
nice smooth colt, of fair size, and has not yet made 
up his mind exactly what he is going to do. Most of 
the work that he has had has been on the trot, but 
he has shown some slight pacing inclinations and 
his future is still in doubt. 

Bay colt by Copa de Oro — Lilly Mac 2: 24 14 (dam 
of Gold Lily (2) 2:24%) by McKinney; a nice gaited 
pacer. 

Bay colt by Carlokin — Salonika, Copa de Oro's first 
foal, grandam Vela McKinney 2:23% by McKinney, 
great grandam Black Swan (dam of two) by Alta 
Vela, etc.; a trotter and a very nice one at that. 

THE YEARLINGS: 
There are a dozen of these little scamps up in the 
Durfee stalls at present, stabled for the most part in 
pairs. They are a bunch that are going to require 
a lot of space from turf writers in years to come, 



Saturday, January 29, 1916.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



6 



Proposed Changes in A.T. A. Rules 

- - TO BE CONSIDKKEI) FKllIU ARY l-IKTI-l-^TH 



judging from the way they are bred and their general 
appearance at this time, so they won't be sore or feel 
slighted if details are not gone into concerning them 
just now, as the typewriter tells me, for the third 
time since I started these long-winded visits with 
the Angelenos, that the space laid out for this partic- 
ular story is rapidly being filled to overflowing. For 
the time being suffice it to say that they are all 
sons or daughters of Carlokin or Copa de Oro, and 
out of the mares enumerated in other pedigrees in 
the preceding paragraphs. They are bays and 
chestnuts, mostly bays, and show that they are well 
bred and well fed. both items of vital importance in 
considering yearlings. Just now they are taking life 
very easily indeed, but before long their actual edu- 
cation will be well under way. and before many 
months have passed we will be hearing of this fellow 
Durfee winning a futurity with one of them. Don't 
you reckon so? 

* * * * 
With the conclusion of this third and last of my 
epistles of the Angelenos, I believe that I have given 
readers of the Breeder and Sportsman a pretty fair 
idea of what is going on at the track there among 
the harness horse folks, and if I have overlooked 
anybody or anybody's horse I extend assurance right 
now that it was through accident and not by design. 
I believe there are a few people who are jogging 
horses at the track who are not stabled there at this 
time, and these got by me simply because I did not 
know where to catch them. Anyone in that locality 
who has a horse in training that escaped attention in 
these stories will confer a favor upon the writer by 
sending news of the same to this office, that we may 
make a proper mention of it. Moreover, it's a long 
ways from this office to Los Angeles, the writer 
doesn't make the trip very often, and we will appre- 
ciate the co-operation of every horseman in keeping 
us and our readers advised as to what goes on there 
during the winter and spring. Nobody is barred, and 
communications are welcome at all times. Don't 
forget the number. — [N.] 

o 

GOVERNMENT LIVE STOCK REPORT. 



Washington, D. C, Jan. 18. — A summary of esti- 
mates of numbers and values of live stock on farms 
and ranges on January 1 for California and for the 
United States, compiled by the Bureau of Crop Esti- 
mates (and transmitted through the Weather Bu- 
reau), U. S. Department of Agriculture, is as follows: 
HORSES. 

State: Number, 493,000, compared with 503,000 a 
year ago and 483,000 five years ago. Value per head, 
$96, compared with ?100 a year ago and $117 five 
years ago. 

United States: Number, 21,200,000, compared with 
21,195,000 a year ago and 20,277,000 five years ago. 
Value per head $101.60, compared with $103.33 a year 
azo and $111.46 five years ago. 

MULES. 

State: Number, 70,000, compared with 74,000 a 
year ago and 71,000 five years ago. Value per head, 
$110, compared with $120 a year ago and $133 five 
years ago. 

United States: Number, 4,560,000, compared with 
4,479,000 a year ago and 4,323,000 five years ago. 
Value per head, $113.87, compared with $112.36 a 
year ago and $125.92 five years ago. 

MILCH COWS. 

State: Number, 568,000, compared with 541,000 a 
year ago and 495,000 five years ago. Value per head, 
$69, compared with $72 a year ago and $48 five years 
ago. 

TJnited States: Number, 22,000,000, compared with 
21,262,000 a year ago and 20,823,000 five years ago. 
Value per head, $53.90, compared with $55.33 a year 
ago and $39.97 five years ago. 

OTHER CATTLE. 

State: Number, 1,550,000, compared with 1,480,000 
a year ago and 1,546,000 five years ago. Value per 
head, $36.30, compared with $39.30 a year ago and 
$23.50 five years ago. 

United States: Number, 39,500,000, compared with 
37,067,000 a year ago and 39,679,000 five years ago. 
Value per head, $33.49, compared with $33.38 a year 
ago and $20.54 five years ago. 

SHEEP. 

State: Number, 2,450,000, compared with 2,500,000 
a year ago and 2,683,000 five years ago. Value per 
head, $5.00, compared with $4.50 a year ago and 
$3.59 five years ago. 

United States: Number, 49,200,000, compared with 
49,956,000 a year ago and 53,633,000 five years ago. 
Value per head, $5.17, compared with $4.50 a year 
ago and $3.91 five years ago. 

SWINE. 

State: Number, 947,000, compared with 877,000 a 
year ago and 790,000 five years ago. Value per head, 
$8.40, compared with $10.50 a year ago and $9.50 five 
years ago. 

United States: Number, 68,000,000, compared with 
64,618,000 a year rgo and 65,620,000 five years ago. 
Value per head, $8.40, compared with $9.87 a year ago 
and $9.37 five years ago. 

o 

Minor Heir l:58i^, one of the great array of pacing 
champions owned at M. W. Savage's International 
1:55 Horse Farm, Savage, Minn., has been leased for 
the breeding season of 1916 to the Tennessee horse- 
man, J. W. Alexander, and will be in service at Mur- 
freesboro. He should be both popular and successful 
in that locality. 



To Members of the American Trotting Association: 

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 2, Chapter 
12, of the By-Laws, I herewith submit report and rec- 
ommendations of the Committee on Revision of By- 
Laws and Rules, adopted by said Committee at a 
meeting held in the office of the Association, Tues- 
day, January 11, 1916. 



The American Trotting Association's Committee on 
Revision of By-Laws and Rules at its meeting on 
January 11 recommended the adoption of the follow- 
ing amendments to the rules by tlie Congress of tlie 
A. T. A. to be held in Chicago, Tuesday, February 
15, 1916: 

Rule 13. — Add to this rule the following: A mem- 
ber may elect to have but one judge, who shall be 
appointed by the American Trotting Association; in 
such case the member shall apply to this Association 
thirty (30) days before its meeting and shall deposit 
with the secretary of the Association the amount 
fixed for such service. Such judge shall not act as 
starter at the same meeting. 

Rule 13. — As amended, will read: "In every exhi- 
bition, race or performance against time over the 
track of a member, the Presiding Officer, or Manager 
of the member, shall appoint or authorize the ap- 
pointment of three men, who are familiar with the 
rules, to act as judges. He shall also appoint three 
persons who are competent to act as timers. He shall 
employ a licensed starter to start the horses, and 
appoint some competent person to act as clerk of 
the course. A member may elect to have but one 
judge, who shall be appointed by the American Trot- 
ting Association; in such case the member shall 
apply to this Association thirty (30) days before its 
meeting and shall deposit with the secretary of this 
Association the amount fixed for such service. Such 
judge shall not act as starter at the same meeting." 

Rule 23. — Add after the word "race" in the second 
line "or matinee," and after the words "public race" 
in the sixth line add "or matinee." 

Rule 23. — As amended, will read: "If a horse has 
ever performed in a public race or matinee, the last 
name under which it performed shall be given in the 
entry; and if the name has been changed within one 
year, each name it has borne during that time must 
be given; and if any horse without a name has ever 
performed in a public race or matinee, mention must 
be made in the entry of a sufficient number of its 
most recent performances to enable interested per- 
sons to identify the horse." 

Rule 39. — After the word "conditions" in the fourth 
line add "the judges' book"; and also at the end of 
the rule add the following: "All entries must be 
made to the individual members. Circuit entries shall 
not be accepted to sustain suspensions." 

Rule 39. — As amended, will read: "No suspensions 
for non-payment of entrance fee shall be lawful un- 
less ordered within fourteen days (omitting Sunday) 
of the close of the meeting, and accompanied by the 
published conditions, the judges' book, the original 
entry and envelope bearing the postmark, if transmit- 
ted through the mails. No suspension shall be im- 
posed for non-payment of such fee contracted in a 
class wherein the horse was permitted to start, ex- 
cept where credit is extended and in any case when 
the member has applied for membership subsequent 
to the closing of its entries, such suspensions shall 
be unlawful unless notice of intended membership 
has been given prior to the closing of the entries. 
All entries must be made to the individual members. 
Circuit entries shall not be accepted to sustain sus- 
pensions." 

Rule 51. — After the word "race" in the third line 
cut out: "If the same is claimed by the nominator 
when making the entry." Also add to the rule the 
following: "All time allowances, under the rules or 
I)ubl!shed conditions must be claimed at the time of 
making the entry and appear tlK-reon." 

Rule 51. — As amended, will read: "A horse with 
a record shall be allowed one second for each year, 
if raced, in which he fails to equal or reduce his 
record or win a race. Other allowances may be 
granted if so stated in the published conditions. All 
time allowances imder the rules or published condi- 
tions must be claimed at the time of making the 
entry and appear thereon." 

Rule 61. — Change so as to read: "Hopples of any 
kind or form shall not be used in races or in per- 
formances against time on three-year olds and 
under." 

"Any person or member of this Association violat- 
ing or permitting the violation of this rule shall be 
fined not less than one hundred dollars ($100), to 
which may be added suspension or expulsion." 

New rule, after Rule 72. — "The starter must not 
solicit entries, distribute entry blanks or act as agent 
for any meeting at which he is employed to act, or do 
anything that is likely to divert entries from one 
member to another." 

Rule 75. — Add after the word "score-cards' 'in the 
last line the following: "He must also preserve the 
timers' certificates and place them in the envelope 
in the front part of the judges' book." 

Riil<! 75. —As amended, will read: "The clerk of 
the course may at the retiuest of the judges assist 
in drawing the positions of horses before the race, 
or other similar duties, and shall keep a book in 
which shall be recorded the name of each driver or 



rider, and colors worn. He shall not the time when a 
heat is finished, and shall notify the judges, or ring 
the bell, at tlie expiration of the time allowed between 
heats; h(> nuiy assist the judges in placing the horses 
at th(> finish of the heat. He shall record in the 
judges' book an account of every race, in the follow- 
ing form, to-wit: 

"First, the system or plan under which the races 
ai'e held: next, all horses entered and their pedigrees, 
and the names of the drivers, or riders; next, the 
starting horses and the positions assigned them; 
next, a record of each heat, giving the position of 
each horse at the finish; then, the official time of 
each heat, and. at the end an official summary of 
the race, giving the drawn, distanced and ruled out 
horses, if any there be. He shall record all protests, 
fines, p(>nalti(>s and appeals and shall check and see 
that the colors and numbers worn by the drivers 
agree with the score-cards. He must also preserve 
the timers' certificates and place them in the envel- 
ope in the front part of the judges' book." 

Rule 89. — After the word "last" in the twenty-first 
line add the word "advertised," to conform with the 
balance of the rule. Also in the same line scratch 
out the words, "of the week." 

Rule 89. — As amended, will read: "In case of un- 
favorable weather or other unavoidable cause, mem- 
bers shall postpone to a definite hour the next fair 
day and good track (omitting Sunday), all stakes 
upon giving notice thereof; they may exercise this 
power before or after the race has commenced. Any 
purse race, or installment plan purse, that closed the 
same year in which it is to be contested, that has not 
been started by five o'clock p. m. on the last adver- 
tised day of the week to which the member has lim- 
ited its meeting during th(> months of May, June, July 
and August, and four o'clock p. m. during the balance 
of the year, shall be declared off. When a purse, or 
class race, is declared off, under this rule, the en- 
trance money shall be returned to the nominator. 
When an installment plan purse is declared off, under 
this rule, the entrance money and forfeits shall be 
divided equally among the nominators eligible to 
start. Any purse race, or installment plan purse, 
that closed the same year in which it is to be con- 
tested, that has been started or remains unfinished 
on the last advertised day to which the member has 
limited its meeting, shall be declared ended and the 
money divided according to the summary." 

Rule 92. — Scratch out the words "after starting in 
a public race" in the third line and after the word 
"and" and at the end of the second line add "if the 
horse has been registered by the American Trotting 
Register Association or has started in a public race 
or matinee." Also cut out the amount of the fine; 
and after the word "requirement" in the eighth line, 
"the winnings become illegal and." 

Rule 92. — As amended, will read: "Every horse 
shall be named and the name correctly and plainly 
written in the entry, and if the horse has been regi.s- 
tered by the American Trotting Register Association 
or has started in a public race or matinee, such name 
shall not be changed, without procuring a record 
thereof, to be made in the office of the secretary of 
this Association. For each violation of this require- 
ment the winnings become illegal and a fine may be 
imposed, together with the suspension of tho horse 
until paid, and no horse shall be thus recorded by a 
name that has been recorded for another horse. 

"Provided, that when a recording fee has been paid 
to The National Trotting Association or the change 
of name has been reciuired by the American Trotting 
Register Association for the purpose of registration, 
no recording fee shall be charged by this Association. 
Certificates from the aforesaid associations to be 
furnished that the recording fee has been paid or the 
name was required to be changed, as the case may 
be." 

Rule 117. — Add after the word "collected" in the 
first line the words, "from drivers." 

Rule 117. — As amended, will read: "All fines col- 
h^cted from drivers, by The American Trotting Asso- 
ciation, shall be deposited in a special Trust Fund 
for the benefit of disabled or needy drivers, disburse- 
ments to be made by a board consisting of one driver, 
one owner and three directors of The American Trot- 
ting Association, to be appoint("d prior to each meet- 
ing by the president, they to meet at the same time 
as th(> Board of Appeals. In an emergency the presi- 
dent may act." 

New rule, after Rule 140.— "Nothing in Rules 138, 
139 or 140 shall prohibit the judges from setting a 
horse back one or more i)laceH if, in their judgment, 
that is sufficient punishment." 

The following preamble and n-solution was unani- 
mously passed and recommended to the members for 
adoi)tion at the Congress: 

"Whereas, the American trotter and pacer, by reg- 
istration and improvement thus made feasible, has 
become the recognized highest type and best estab- 
lished family in the animal kingdom, and 

"Whereas, In racing horses for thr> greatest im- 
provement of the type, many cases of ringing and 
false pedigree have and will, until checked, cause 
trouble and large loss to honest horsemen devoted 
to the breeding and racing industry, and 

"Whereas, the most positive and available check 
upon such fraud is shown by long experience to be 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 29, 1916. 



classification and certain identification. 

"Now, therefore, be it Resolved, That the board of 
directors be and is hereby instructed and directed in 
association and concurrence with The National Trot- 
ting Association, or its board of directors, to devise 
and promulgate a system of rules and regulations re- 
quiring all horses now or hereafter engaged in trot- 
ting or pacing races, to be registered with the Amer- 
ican Trotting Register Association, as a pre-requisite 
to the eligibility of such horses to participate in any 
trotting or pacing races, under the rules of either 
of the two associations." 

W. P. IJAMS, 
THOS. H. GILL, 
W. H. SMOLLINGER, 
C. E. CAMERON, 

Committee. 

Section 2, Chapter 12, of the By-Laws also pro- 
vides: "That nothing herein shall be construed 
prevent the Congress in regular session amending 
any of these rules, if deemed necessary." 

W. H. KNIGHT, Secretary. 

o 

A CHRISTMAS TREE FOR HORSES. 



"A Christmas tree for horses? Nonsense; you're 
joking," I protested. 

"Not at all," was the reply. "It is a regular 
Christmas tree, with carrots and apples for decora- 
tions and great bags of oats and shocks of corn- 
fodder standing about the foot of it just like candy, 
oranges and nuts are stacked about the Sunday- 
school trees every Christmas eve." 

So I set out to find this newest form of Christmas 
celebration and to see for myself just what a horse's 
Christmas tree looked like. 

Sure enough, at the grounds of the National Cap- 
itol Horse Show Association within 3 blocks of the 
White House, I found the tree decked out with car- 
rots and apples presumed to be as dear to the equine 
palate as candy and oranges are to the children's. 
There also I found a bevy of women; they were 
supervising the affair with apparently as much pleas- 
ure and enjoyment as if every old, wornout plug 
that entered these grounds, hitherto sacred to the 
bluest of blue-blooded horseflesh, was indeed a Thor- 
oughbred of long pedigree. 

Postmaster General Burleson and his wife, both 
lovers of horses, were present at the opening of the 
affair and watched with interest the arrivals, Mrs. 
Burleson holding out apples and carrots to eager, 
hungry animals or else bearing down some of the 
higher branches, that the delicacies might be the 
more easily reached by those horses that were led 
to the tree to nibble a few bites direct. 

And how busy those good ladies were! Into the 
grounds came an aged Negro, one of the old time, 
leading behind him about as decrepit and ancient 
a specimen of horseflesh as ever straightened a 
trace. One of the ladies met him, directed him first 
to the watering trough and then to a vacant stall, of 
which there were over 150. One of the men em- 
ployed for the purpose followed with a paper bag 
holding a big feed of oats; the manger already was 
filled with the best of hay. Over the old veteran the 
men threw a heavy horse blanket and one tried to 
imagine what thoughts must be running through his 
mind as he found himself in such luxurious quarters 
and feeding on the best in the land, from an equine 
point of view. 

Through the gate came a constant procession of 
horses of all grades, types and conditions. Small 
darky boys rode on bareback, having left the vehi- 
cle in the street as scarcely fit for taking into such 
an arena. Several on foot were questioned, and ad- 
mitted that their parents had sent them in to spy 
out the land, the older people having in some way 
conceived the idea that it was some scheme to get 
hold of their dear old nags and either arrest the own- 
ers for cruelty to animals or else condemn the horses 
as useless. Reassured, they ran off to return later 
with horse and wagon, which had apparently been 
hidden away on some side street while the pickaninny 
was scouting for information as to the nature of this 
unheard-of offer of free horse feed. 

And what an array of horses came to the feast! 
Not all were starvelings or decrepit, but certainly 
most of them seemed to realize they were somewhat 
out of their regular orbit. There were old stagers 
unhitched from night-prowling, sea-going hacks, of 
which the capitol has many, driven by old colored 
men with ancient plug hats. I saw a flea-bitten gray 
mule, perhaps once the pride of some army team- 
ster, his knees bowed and stiff, his long ears flapping 
like the sails of a deserted ship, stumbling along 
through the gates drawing the market wagon of an 
old man who had come to town with a load of Christ- 
mas greens. One of those heavy wagons used by 
Greek vegetable peddlers pulled up outside the 
grounds. The animal hitched to the rig was a great, 
gaunt gray, his hide hanging in loose folds over his 
ugly frame like a gray blanket hung on a stake-and- 
rider fence. The long fetlocks, each bunch of hair 
now decorated with tiny balls of Virginia mud picked 
up on the country roads, betokened the possibility of 
Shire or Clydesdale ancestry. His coat, once a 
dapple-gray, was now rough and so manure-stained as 
almost to lose its original color. His hoofs were so 
cracked and split, and there was so little sound 
material in which to drive a nail that one wondered 
what held the shoes on. Perhaps one day he was the 
wheel horse in some splendid brewery six, with his 
mane and tail all plaited and decorated with red and 



blue ribbons. 

An old lady who had brought to market few dozen 
eggs drove up in a wreck of a buggy, certainly a 
reproduction of the "one boss shay," perhaps older, 
drawn by an ancient chestnut with a bald face that 
even in his old age showed signs of the bluest blood 
of Virginia. "Who knows," remarked one of the 
ladies, herself a Virginian and by that same token 
a keen judge of horse values, "who knows but what 
that old fellow once went down the line before the 
grandstand wearing the winning colors?" 

They gathered around the old lady, watched the 
men unhitch the horse — both traces tied to the 
singletree with baling wire — and then, as if she were 
the first dame in the land, they showed her to a little 
room in which she found a seat; in her hands was 
placed a tincup full of steaming hot coffee and before 
her plates piled high with fresh-baked doughnuts, of 
which she was bidden to eat as many as she possibly 
could. And what those kids, both white and black, did 
to the doughnut piles was a caution. "Worth all it 
cost," was the remark of one man who put up some 
of the money that paid for the feast, "just to see 
those kids eat, to say nothing of the animals." 

And so it went from 10 a. m. to 4 p. m. for two 
days. 

Certainly into this haven of Christmas tide drifted 
much of the flotpam and jetsam of the near-by horse 
world, the equine derelicts of the Capitol City. It 
was as great a study as the breadline in a large city, 
and equally pathetic. The animal "breadliners," how- 
ever, had no tales of woe to relate, no stories of 
ruined lives, of blasted hopes and hard-luck experi- 
ences. 

The ladies were not only providers of Christmas 

cheer but gatherers of statistics as well, as the name, 
color, sex, and residence of each owner was care- 
fully taken down, also the name and other statistical 
information concerning the animal. Looking the list 
over, the only thing like it that I could recall was the 
1890 list of 12.5 cow ponies we used on my old Arizona 
cow ranch, which I ran across in an old note book 
not long ago. The old-time cowpunchers vied with 
one another in naming their mounts, running from 
Alexander the Great, hung to a diminutive Navajo 
Indian pony, to Dolly Dimple, applied to a huge, 
overgrown, ungainly square-headed affair used only 
for a pack animal. Likewise these later names ran 
the gamut of animal nomenclature, but regardless of 
sex every mule in the District of Columbia seems to 
be named Maud. 

Nor did these good women stop at the feed offered, 
as each man was urged to carry off with him one or 
more of the huge bundles of what in this southland 
they call "long feed" — cornstalks. Those who came 
with vehicles took advantage of the offer and thus 
the Christmas cheer was prolonged to another feed- 
ing time. 

Later in the afternoon when there were no more 
arrivals at the grounds the ladies loaded their autos 
down with heavy paper bags, each holding several 
pounds of oats, and having divided up the city into 
districts they went into the highways and byways and 
sought out those that had not come to the feast, 
finding them at the city markets, on the hack, car- 
riage and express stands, and elsewhere; to every 
owner who would accept it they gave a sack for each 
animal.. 

As a seeker after information I asked the charm- 
ing lady who piloted me about the place as to the 
object of the peculiar charity. 

"Just a love for the horse," was her reply. "Many 
of us interested in the annual horse show felt that 
by this means we could arouse a certain amount of 
interest and sympathy among the class of people 
who own the kind of horses you have seen here 
today, that would lead them to take better care of 
their animals. They say that the way to a man's 
heart is through his stomach," she smiled knowingly, 
"and perhaps we may reach some of these men 
through the stomachs of their horses. Certainly it is 
bound to set some of them to thinking." 

She further explained that all the money was raised 
by subscription among men and women interested in 
the horse. No appeal was made publicly and there 
was more money offered than they could use. Nat- 
urally the question comes as to the merit of such a 
charity when perhaps thousands of men, women and 
children are starving to death in foreign countries. 
But it seems quite certain that people who would 
give willingly for such a cause would give far more 
readily to the cause of humanity and without doubt 
not one of the givers to this horse feeding fund re- 
duced his or her charities by a penny. Nor could I 
discover the names of a single giver to this fund. 
No names were s'gned to the posters which were 
distributed all over the city where they would reach 
the right people inviting the horses to the feast; at 
the bottom the simple words, "Lovers of the horse," 
hid the donors' names. 

It is a safe bet that a lot of those old plugs marked 
it down as a red letter day in their brains, lest they 
should forget the date in 1916, at which time it is 
proposed to repeat what is, so far as I can learn, the 
very first Christmas tree ever given to horses. That 
it should originate here in the capital of the nation 
seems peculiarly fitting; that it will spread to other 
cities goes without saying, for the idea appeals to 
every horse lover. — Will C. Barnes, Breeders' Ga- 
zette. 

o 

The sooner you begin your stallion advertising, the 
better the returns from it will be. 



j NOTES and NEWS \ 

T ? 



The first foal reported from any of the larger 
eastern farms is the brown fellow foaled January 5 
at Curies Neck by The Harvester 2:01, dam Roberta 
Bingen (3) 2:13% by Bingen 2:06»/4. 

The dopesters have figured up that Alonzo McDon- 
ald has marked an even thirty trotters in 2:10 or 
better. Billie Burk 2:031,4 heads the delegation, fol- 
lowed by Bob Douglas 2:04% and Star Winter 2:05. 

\\\ L. Snow, the Grand Circuit teamster who has 
been at Detroit with the horses of his various Michi- 
gan patrons since the close of the last racing season, 
ships to Memphis the first of February and will get 
ready for the frays of 1916 over the early track at 
Billings Park. 

Old Folks 2:11% and Raisin Girl, with a trotting 
trial better than 2:10, both sold by California con- 
signors to the recent Chicago sale, will be seen on 
the tracks of the Hoosier state this summer. We 
have a sneaking little notion that they will be found 
heading the summaries, or ranking second, pretty 
regularly. 

Have you sent us an order for stallion cards or a 
season announcement? You never heard of Peter 
the Great until someone told you about him or you 
read of him in a turf paper, so don't expect people to 
know all about your horse unless you boom him 
along. This watchful waiting policy will not bring 
in business for a stallion. 

The many friends of David Cahill of Lexington 
will learn with j-egret that Mrs. Cahill died recently 
at the age of seventy-three years, after an illness of 
but a very few days. Five children, three daughters 
and two sons, remain to help make things pleasant 
for their father in his old age, but Uncle Davy will 
sadly miss the one who was his steadfast partner for 
so many years, whether the going was good or bad. 

That the progression of human affairs takes the 
course of a circle is once more attested down in New 
York state. Stony Ford has been placed back on the 
map by Louis Titus, and the old Jesse Bull farm near 
Monroe, the birthplace of Blue Grass, Hamblehawk, 
Menelaus and other sons of the immortal Hamble- 
tonian 10, will again become the home of trotters, 
Herman R. Grossman having recently purchased it 
for use as a breeding farm. 

^❖<«> 

The track at Readville, Mass., idle for the last 
several seasons, was sold for taxes on January four- 
teenth and was bid in by the town of Dedham, the 
future fate of the famous course being as yet un- 
known. Many and many are the great contests that 
have been staged at Readville in the days gone by 
when the harness horse was in his full glory, and it 
will live forever in turf history as the strip of dirt 
over which the first mile in two minutes was trotted 
by Lou Dillon. 

•«>•$><?> 

Alonzo McDonald recently purchased one of the 
most promising two-year-old trotters in the Blue 
Grass in the shape of the chestnut colt by Axworthy 
(3) 2:15i/i and out of the great matron Nervolo 
Belle (dam of Peter Volo 2:02 and Volga (2) 2:07%) 
by Nervolo 2:041,4. The check that Lon wrote for 
George L. Knight was a rather healthy one and a 
portion of the money represented by the neat little 
slip of paper has already found its way to the Pacific 
coast and San Francisco, J. N. Colomb of this city 
having been Mr. Knight's partner in the youngster. 
<«>^<S> 

The heavy rains of January put a temporary 
quietus upon the meeting of the Lower California 
Jockey Club at Tia Juana, rail connections with the 
cities on the American side being put out of service 
and a certain amount of damage being inflicted to 
the racing plant itself. This, however, was announced 
to be of a minor nature, easily repaired after the 
water receded, and as rail service was expected to 
be resumed in a short time the racing will begin 
where it left off and go merrily on. Reports by both 
correspondence and visitors to the Mexican town 
have good accounts to make of the manner in which 
the racing is conducted and of the brand of sport 
furnished under handicaps of considerable moment. 

The Utah national guard's artillery corps located 
at Salt Lake City is fully prepared to cope with any 
invader that threatens that city — if the enemy army 
is mounted on on wooden horses. For Utah has gone 
ancient Greece one better. The Greeks enlisted a 
huge wooden horse which aided them to victory at 
Troy. Utah's amateur artillerymen have, not one, 
but four wooden horses, which have aided them to 
victory over all opponents — in several competitive 
drills. Battery I hitches four regulation size hobby 
horses to a modern breech-loading gun. and at their 
weekly drill the soldiers harness and unharness, 
laount and dismount, load and fire. Recently the 
squad ran the horses and gun from the armory, har- 
nessed up and were in the saddle in two minutes and 
37 seconds. It's a whole lot cheaper to drill on 
wooden horses; they don't eat and the soldiers can 
make them themselves. — Horse World. 



Saturday, January 29, 1916.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



According to some of our eastern exchanges, there 
is a probability that the fast trotting mares Margaret 
Druien 2:03Vi and Lettie Lee 2:06%, acquired at the 
recent Old Glory sale by C. K. G. Billings and now at 
his Curies Neck Farm in Virginia, may be prepared 
for a trip against the amateur record for trotting 
teams. 

Vermont horsemen are waxing enthusiastic just 
at present over the yearling colt American Harves- 
ter, by The Harvester out of Adioo Dillon 2:24',4. 
acquired by one of their number at the last Old Glory 
-sale. Adioo Dillon is the dam of that good futurity 
trotter Dillon Axworthy (2) 2:lli4, and like many 
others of the famous family to which she owns 
allegiance was bred here in California, at the old 
Santa Rosa Stock Farm. 

<$■<?><$> 

Rodney MacKenzie and his thoroughbred trainer. 
Jack Atkin, are on a trip to eastern and southern 
points, paying a visit to the races at New Orleans 
and to the thoroughbred farms in the Blue Grass. 
Buckhorn, the good son of Broomstick — Thirty-Third 
that won the Brooklyn, Empire City, Douglas Park 
Inaugural and other stakes in Atkin's hands, is doing 
stud duty at the farm of Hal Price Headley in com- 
pany with Uncle. Ivan the Terrible, Jack Atkin and 
San Vega. He will be allowed but twenty mares, as 
this is his first year in the stud, and his limited book 
is rapidly filling. 

<?><«><?> 

James Erwin. one of the best known horsemen of 
the Pacific northwest and who for a long time made 
his headquarters at North Yakima, lies in a critical 
condition in a San Francisco hospital. About two 
years ago he came to California as assistant trainer 
to H. S. Dowling. then superintendent of Woodland 
Stock Farm, but for the past year has been unable 
to perform any duties in cart or sulky and has been 
confined for tho greater part of that time at his 
home at 1214 Polk street, this city. Ervin brought 
out, among many other excellent horses, the chestnut 
gelding Mack Fitzsimmons 2:07%, now a member of 
the stable of H. H. Helman. 

C. A. Harrison came into civilization from the 
wilds of the* Puget Sound country a few days ago and 
after putting the finishing touches upon the deal 
which transferred the ownership of the property 
known as Woodland Stock Farm to Charles F. Silva 
spent several days in the vicinity of San Francisco 
bay. Early in the week he was a visitor at Pleasan- 
ton in company with A. B. Coxe, John W. Considine 
and Sven Christenson, most of the quartet taking a 
mount and doing a little jogging as a stimulant to 
their appetites. The Pleasanton track has had a 
pretty steady soaking for weeks, but was in nice 
shape for winter work at the time the above party 
was there. 

■S> <«> ^ 

That White Sox — Hal Boy race is now merely a 
matter of arranging conditions suitable to both par- 
ties. Clarence Berry has turned this end of the 
negotiations over to his trainer and racing man- 
ager. Will Durfee, and correspondence relative to 
the affair is being exchanged between that gentle- 
man and Greeley Winings, manager for Stoughton 
Fletcher. No serious difficulties are anticipated In 
the way of getting together on a basis suitable to 
all concerned and a definite announcement concern- 
ing the same will probably be made within the next 
several days. Interest in the proposition is steadily 
increasing and it should prove one of the attractions 
of the big line this summer. 

A. K. Macomber of Paicines Rancho has been a 
recent visitor in the Blue Grass, inspecting Walnut 
Hall Farm and other varied interests of the estate 
of the late L. V. Harkness. Mr. Macomber is one 
of the foremost breeders of purebred livestock in 
California and a great lover of the horse, his active 
entry into the racing game being foreshadowed by 
his recent importation of English thoroughbreds, 
selected for him by Vv'alter B. Jennings and now 
being trained by that capable gentleman at Charles- 
ton, S. C. While the future of Walnut Hall was 
problematic following the death of Mr. Harkness, no 
steps have been taken so far by the heirs that in 
any way portend a change in the old policies or the 
dispersal of the trotting stock, which are matters 
of much gratification to lovers of the horse and of 
the famous old farm. 

George A. Ryan, whose connection with the trotters 
in an editorial way dates back many years to the 
time when he was "hoss" editor of one of the Boston 
dallies, is now the proprietor of a book store in Cov- 
ington, Louisiana, (doming west some years ago 
Ryan took over the editorship of the now defunct 
Horseman and Spirit of the Times, his excellent 
work there causin;? him to be sought to fill a similar 
position on the Western Horseman, where his ability 
was properly appreciated and where in the course of 
a few years he became a substantial stockholder in 
that concern. Ill health caused him to give up his 
interests in Indianapolis some two or three years 
ago and seek a home in the south, where his health 
has improved in a most gratifying manner. He is 
one of the able turf writers of the country, and his 
recovery to a point at which he might again engage 
in the old line w-ould be welcome to countless per- 
sonal friends and a very large following among the 
readers of trotting journals. 



In answer to an inquiry from a correspondent at 
Oroville, the following information is given concern- 
ing the pacer Little Thorne 2:07',4: He was bred at 
Stockton by L. I'. Shippee, was foaled in 1893, a son 
of Hawthorne 10935 and Grace Hale by Director 
1989, second dam Nettie Nutwood by Nutwood 600. 
He was driven to his record on August 30, 1900, at 
Woodland by James Thompson. 

<$><J>^ 

Fred Johnston of Calgary, one time owner of the 
fast pacer Yedno 2:02% that threw such a surprise 
into the Grand Circuiters at Montreal, is now pinning 
his hopes to a five-year-old pacer by the California 
bred speed marvel, Ray o" Light (3) 2:08Vi, whose 
mile in that notch at Portland still stands as the 
record for the age and gait in the Pacific northwest, 
the dam of the Johnston prospect being Almota by 
Vice Regent, brother to Heir-at-Law 2:0,5%. The 
bird has not been strung for the route as yet, but last 
season paced the final fractions of moderate miles 
over a poor halfmile track in :14':i. 

We have a call from a gentleman in the central 
portion of the state for a few standard bred fillies 
by The Bondsman, from yearlings up, providing the 
prices are in keeping with the times. They are 
wanted for the purpose of putting in the breeding 
ranks only, so parties with well developed Bondsman 
trotting prospects would probably not find the prices 
to their liking. However, it is probable that there 
are a few fillies of this family scattered through Cal- 
ifornia that will not do to race, or will not be trained 
owing to the scarcity of local racing, and the owners 
of these might dispose of them to advantage at this 
time. W'e will be pleased to put such owners into 
communication with the prospective buyer, but please 
do not write letters trying to dispose of young mares 
by any other stallion, as the same will represent 
merely wasted time. Fillies by The Bondsman are 
the onlv kind wanted by this party. 

J. E. Montgomery of Davis, whose three specialties 
are raising champion pacers, high priced beef cattle 
and getting more day in and day out service out of 
an automobile than any other farmer in his neighbor- 
hood, is probably back at the old familiar quarters 
at the track at Woodland by this time, as he 
announced his intention of making the move some 
days ago. taking along the coast's ch-^-mpion pacer, 
Jim Logan 2:01%, and a considerable stable of 
younger horses. Jim will be in service at Woodland 
during the breeding season, and Elmo has his neck 
bowed to get away from the jonah that followed his 
trail last year, when practically the whole stable 
that he depended on starting was put on the shelf 
by accident or sickness. Loren Daniels with the big 
string belonging to Charley Silva was also expected 
to make the change from the state fair grounds to 
the Woodland plant, so that place will be the scene 
of considerable speed making this season. 



As the Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stakes Number 
Sixteen for foals of mares bred in 1915 close on 
Tuesday, February first — next Tuesday — we take 
advantage of this last opportunity to call the atten- 
tion of western breeders to the importance of making 
nominations in this event. Colt stakes are not only 
becoming fewer in number on this coast but the 
decline of patronage to the same, enforced through 
the decline in harness horse breeding, has caused 
them to be made for more modeSt figures, but unless 
proper support is extended they cannot continue to 
be given even on the new basis. 

Nothing adds so much to the value of the trotting 
bred colt as a liberal number of futurity engage- 
ments, and nothing contributes more to making a 
youngster of this kind a drug on the market than 
a lack of early opportunities. The demand nowadays 
is for horses that can race, and the earlier one can 
race the better the buyers like him. Engagements in 
colt stakes may be secured at such a moderate cost, 
when compared with the opportunity for profit, that 
every breeder of trotteis and pacers can well afford 
to nominate every mare bred by him in some or all 
of the local classics — better all of them than only 
some. No longer ago than last season certain owners 
right here in California saw good money won by colts 
not so good as their own, merely because their breed- 
ers had the foresight to provide them with early 
engagements, while training a colt for one race is 
merely an aggravation. You would not open a store 
until you had stocked its shelves, and you cannot 
market speed save through the medium of paid up 
entrance fees. 

The Breeders' Futurities have for so long been 
annual fixtures in the racing calendar of the Pacific 
coast that it seems scarcely necessary to go into 
detail concerning the conditions under which they 
are staged, but anyone not familiar with the same 
will find them in full on page two of this issue of 
the Breeder and Sportsman. The money is so appor- 
tioned that the stallion owner, the original nominator 
of the winner and the owners of the four horse.s 
heading the summary of each of the four divisions of 
the stake are well rewarded, and the initial cost of 
making entries is but two dollars a mare. The date 
of closing is now set so far along in the season that 



In 1914 Alonzo McDonald's brown trotter McClos- 
key won in excess of ten thousand dollars without 
getting out of the 2:30 class, which was some per- 
formance until Worthy Prince came along in 1915 
and annexed nearly thirteen thousand dollars without 
winning a heat. Both of them must be world's rec- 
ords of their kind. 

Peter Stevens 2:02V4 has been sent to the stable 
of Tommy Murphy at Poughkeepsie and will be 
raced this year by the lengthy New Yorker. Last 
year he twice showed his ability to beat 2:04 over 
halfmile tracks, so he must be given consideration 
as a horse liable to figure well up in the hottest 
kind of company in Murphy's hands. 

<$><$><?> 

Cleo Dillon (3) 2:13%, one of the most highly 
prized trotting mares on the Pacific coast, died last 
Svmday night at Bonnie Brae, the establishment of 
her owner, E. A. Gammon, in Sacramento county, as 
the rc^sult of a fatal illness following the consump- 
tion of a moderate ration of beet pulp, while her year- 
ling stud colt. The Meteor, by Peter McKlyo (3) 
2:12V^, came very nearly dying from a similar ail- 
ment. Cleo Dillon, who was a daughter of Sidney 
Dillon and the double producing matron Cleo G. (dam 
also of Easter Direct 2:09V4) by Yosemite 4906, was 
bred by Mr. Gammon and as a three-year-old in the 
hands of Schuyler Walton won both the Occident 
stake and the Breeder futurity, taking her record 
in the second heat of the latter event, raced that 
year over the old Speedway track at Chico. Some 
time afterward, Charley DeRyder, considerably im- 
pressed with the quality which the mare should show 
as a producer, persuad(>d Mr. (Jammon to allow him 
to send her to Kentucky to be mated with Axworthy, 
the resultant foa! to become their common property. 
This plan was followed out and proved most gratify- 
ing in its success, the foal being the bay filly Miss 
Axworthy Dillon, who apparently had a prior right to 
third money in all of her futurity engagements here 
on the coast last year as a two-year-old, though once 
out of her three starts she divided third and fourth 
moneys with Hermes. At Pleasanton, where she was a 
hot contender throughout the fastest race for the age 
ever trotted in California, she was separately tim(>d 
the first heat in 2:14% and came back for the sec- 
ond in 2:15, a performance all the more creditable 
when it is considered that she had been off pasture 
but about four months at this time. She is a nice 
headed thing, sound, and Mr. DeRyder regards her 
as a three-year-old that may do to take over east, 
as she is entered in every stake in the country and 
he considers her capable of trotting in 2:08 this 
season with any sort of luck. Cleo Dillon was to 
have been bred to The Anvil 2:02% next month, and 
great expectations were entertained by the owner as 
a result of this union. The loss to him is a severe 
one, and he cautions horsemen everywhere to keep 
their animals away from beet pulp. 



it should be possible for almost every experienced 
breeder to determine whether his mares are safe with 
foal, and the substitution clause affords him further 
safeguard against loss in case he does draw a blank 
from his breeding operations or the mare or foal dies, 
as there are always a certain number of people who 
do not make original entries but depend upon buying 
substitutions, so that these are generally in demand 
to the limit of the number available. The cost of 
keeping the entry in good standing i.s distributed over 
a considerable period and is not a hardship, as the 
payments are moderate and none are in excess of 
the sum of ten dollars with the exception of the start- 
ing fees. In this manner a colt may safely and eco- 
nomically be carried in the stake vmtil the time when 
it is definitely proven whether he has the quality to 
justify the owner in starting him, and in case he is 
tried and found wanting the suiji previously paid out 
in entrance and installments will not be seriously 
missed. 

Th(> Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' Asso- 
ciation, which sponsors tliis event, has for many, 
many years been recognized as the foremost factor 
in k(>(>ping trotting horse breeding and racing alive 
in this i)arl of the world. They have staged an 
annual meeting that has been one of the principal 
features of each racing season, and the present num- 
ber of their series of futurities is the sixteenth, 
nearly one hundred thousand dollars having been 
paid to western breeders through the medium of 
these stakes alone, while the amount paid out by 
them in stakes and purses since their annual meet- 
ings were first inaugurated totals a much greater 
and more impressive sum. The debt of horsemen In 
general to the association is a generous one, and you 
owe it first to yourself, then to them, to see that this 
stake fills and fills well. 

Also consider the fact that the decrease In number 
of entries means so much greater percentage in favor 
of your colt developing into a money earner in the 
stake. Entries postmarked prior to noon of VV«'dnes- 
day are legal under the rules, but we would suggest 
that you take no chances of ineligibility and make 
your nominations in ample time. The future of colt 
stakes in California is hanging in the balance, and 
it is the breeder who has the say as to whether they 
will be continued or abandoned. 



Last Call for Breeders' Futurity Entries 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 29, 1916. 



LAST CALL FOR THE DUCK HUNTERS! 



ROD. GUN AND KENNEL 



CONDUCTED BY FISHER HUNT 



ANGLERS" ASSOCIATION ELECTS OFFICERS. 



Members of the California Anglers' Association got 
together Monday night at the club rooms at 935 Mar- 
ket street for their eleventh annual meeting. All the 
boys were in good cheer and a large gathering of the 
devotees of the rod was present. 

The reports of the secretary and treasurer showed 
the association to be in a prosperous condition. 

The officers elected and who will serve for the 
ensuing year are Ployde Spence, president; Charles 
F. Breidenstein and J. J. Gorman, vice-presidents; 
George A. Wentworth, secretary; Herman Cohn, 
treasurer; Dr. L. T. Cranz, M. Uri and Wilson Bal- 
lantine, directors. 

Following the annual meeting w^as an enjoyable 
game of whist, participated in by members and 
friends present. 

The association during its existence has accom- 
plished much good work along the lines of conserva- 
tion of the game fish of California and in keeping 
the fishing waters of the State open to the people 
without hindrance of trespass laws. Through its 
efforts the State constitution was amended several 
years ago, preserving to the people the right to fish 
upon all present State public lands, whether they be 
sold and conveyed to private parties or not. 

It has been the policy of the association to lend 
its every assistance in the enforcement of the laws 
so needful for a proper conservation of the fish life 
of the State. 

o 

BIG TRAP SHOOTING SEASON FOR COAST. 



The trap shooting season on the Pacific Coast will 
soon be ushered in for what appears to be the most 
prosperous one in its history. Already preliminary 
details are being settled to line up the clubs and map 
out the programme of attractions that will be an 
inducement for the boys to make the smoke fly. 
Present plans are to start the club events the last 
of February and then the fun will continue until 
well into the winter. 

C. A. Haight, secretary-treasurer of the California- 
Nevada Trap Shooters' Association, and E. Reed 
Shaner, secretary of the Interstate Association, are 
out with important announcements for Pacific Coast 
experts, who are polishing up their shooting irons. 
Mr. Haight is calling on the members of the Califor- 
nia-Nevada Association to come forward with their 
dues and applications to hold the annual tournament 
of the organization and Mr. Shaner tells the good 
news that there will be a Pacific Coast Championship 
tournament this season. Mr. Haight writes as fol- 
lows: 

"Breeder and Sportsman: 

"We are enclosing a copy of letter that has been 
forwarded to each club, a member of the California- 
Nevada Trap Shooters' Association, and booklet of 
the Interstate Association, constitution and by-laws 
of our association, with the desire that after reading 
same you will join with us as a member of our organ- 
ization, and thereby boost California and Nevada in 
bluorock shooting, ond in this way continue the repu- 
tation that we have already acquired as a Class "A" 
organization. 

"Awaiting your reply and thanking you in advance 
for your membership, beg to remain 
"Yours very truly, 
"CAL.-NEVADA TRAP SHOOTERS' ASSN., 

"C. A. HAIGHT, Sec.-Treas." 
The letter is as follows: — 

"The annual dues of your club to the California- 
Nevada Trap Shooters' Ass'n are now due and pay- 
able in the sum of for the year 1916. It is particu- 
larly desirable that you forward the amount to the 
undersigned at as early a date as possible which will 
enable the secretary to make his report of clubs 
affiliating with our association to the Interstate As- 
sociation, this request being made to conform to the 
rules of that association. 

"The outlook for a successful trap shooting season 
is very good indeed and the continuance of the mem- 
bership of your club is earnestly requested. We en- 
close herewith a pamphlet issued by the Interstate 
Association which thoroughly covers all the benefits 
to be derived by your club and our association, in 
addition to which the California-Nevada Trap Shoot- 
ers offer special trophies to be competed for by our 
members only, at our annual tournament. 

"You will please note from the Interstate Associa- 
tion pamphlet that we are enclosing that the Cali- 
fornia-Nevada Trap Shooters' Association ranks as 
Class 'A' as regards to the benefits to be derived, 
and it is our endeavor to keep our association in 
this class, which can only be accomplished by the 
affiliation of as many clubs of the states of California 
and Nevada as is possible to have as members. 

"In view of the coming trapshooting season and 
anticipating the desire of many clubs to hold the 
tournament in the spring months we, therefore, sug- 
gest that all clubs desiring to bid for the annual 
tournament make their application for same by 



March 31, 1916. 

"This will enable the secretary to place the matter 
before the board of directors and also give time to 
the secretary to take up any minor details that may 
have to be discussed with each club, it being our 
desire to make the award of the tournament by 
March 5th. 

"Yours very truly, 
"CAL.-NEVADA TRAP SHOOTERS' ASSN., 

"C. A. HAIGHT, Sec.-Treas." 

The officers of the California-Nevada Trap Shoot- 
ers' Association for this year are: President, Colonel 
J. W. Dorsey; vice-president, G. H. Anderson; secre- 
tary-treasurer, Clarence A. Haight; directors, H. 
Pflrrmann, Los Angeles, C. A. Julian, San Diego, A. J. 
Flickinger, Vallejo, W. S. Pease, Elko, Nev., Henry 
Garrison, Modesto, F. K. Burnham, Martinez, and 
Thomas Wilkes, San Francisco. 

San Jose is the first in the field to secure the 
event. At a meeting of the Chamber of Commerce 
of that thriving city last week, O. N. Ford brought 
to attention the advisability of securing the Califor- 
nia-Nevada shoot. Mr. Ford told the San Jose Cham- 
ber of Commerce that the Garden City had an excel- 
lent chance of securing the event and that 100 people 
would be on hand for four or five days early in June. 
The city would be advertised extensively by the re- 
ports of the contests that would appear in the daily 
papers and the sporting publications. 

Mr. Ford told the directors of the Chamber of 
Commerce that the members of the Blue Rock Club 
of San Jose had raised $850 of the necessary sum of 
$1,000 to successfully promote the shoot. Within five 
minutes the directors had subscribed $50 and no 
trouble is anticipated in securing the remaining $100. 

Secretary Haight expects there will be quite a 
friendly controversy to secure the Pacific Coast fix- 
ture. New clubs are entering the trap shooting field 
and the holding of the California-Nevada shoot will 
be a feather in the cap of the lucky club that wins 
out. 

E. Reed Shaner's announcement of the decision of 
the Interstate Association to reconsider its action so 
as to give a Pacific Coast tournament this year is as 
follows : 

"Editor Breeder and Sportsman: 
"Please be kind enough to state in the trap de- 
partment of Breeder and Sportsman that the direc- 
tors of The Interstate Association have reconsidered 
the action taken by them at their annual meeting 
and have ruled to give a Pacific Coast Trapshooting 
Tournament this year. We will, therefore, be pleased 
to receive applications from clubs in Pacific Coast 
territory that desire this event to be held under their 
auspices. All applications should be sent to The 
Interstate Association, 219 Coltart Avenue, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., on or before February 10th. 
"Yours very truly, 
"THE INTERSTATE ASSOCIATION, 
"E. REED SHANER, 
"Secretary The Interstate Association." 



It is understood that the Portland Club will make 
an application for the classic. Last year the event 
was held in San Diego and it is considered only fair 
that the Pacific Coast championship should be con- 
tested in the north this year. The tentative date has 
been fixed at some time in August, although it is pos- 
sible it may be changed later on. 

The trap shooting tournaments arranged up to date 
by the Interstate Association are as follows: 

Southern Tournament at Memphis, Tenn., May 9, 
10, 11; $1,000 added money. 

Western Tournament at Omaha, Neb., June 13, 14, 
15; $1,000 added money. 

Eastern Tournament at Philadelphia, Penn., July 
18, 19, 20; $1,000 added money. 

Grand American Tournament at, St. Louis, Mo. 
August 21, 22, 23, 24 and 25; $3,500 added money. 

The Pacific Coast Tournament will be listed with 
these events as fixtures of the Interstate Associa- 
tion's programme. 

E. Reed Shaner makes further announcement for 
the benefit of trap shooters that the association's 
booklet containing the 1915 trapshooting averages 
will be put in the mails about March 1st. The book- 
let will be widely distributed at that time. 



CLOSED DEER SEASON IN CONTRA COSTA. 



The supervisors of Contra Costa county recently 
adopted an ordinance prohibiting the killing of deer 
and antelope within that county. The ordinance 
reads: 

"Every person who pursues, hunts, takes, kills or 
destroys any deer or any antelope within the county 
of Contra Costa is guilty of a misdemeanor and upon 
conviction thereof, shall be punished by a fine not to 
exceed five hundred dollars ($500) or by imprison- 
ment in the county jail for a term not to exceed six 
months or by both such fine and imprisonment." 

No limit as to the length of this closed season was 
set. The increase of deer and antelope will alone 
decide when the season will again be opened. 



On Monday next one-half hour after sunset the 
open season in California will come to a close. It 
will mark the finish of one of the most disastrous 
waterfowl seasons the hunters have experienced in 
years. Adverse weather has been almost a chronic 
complaint since the law permitted firing on October 
15th. The terrific storm which swept all sections of 
the state had a tendency to scatter the birds far and 
wide and then the rain came to bring about flood 
conditions so that the gunners could not get within 
range of the game. 




TAKING A LAST SHOT AT THE DUCKS 
Pete Ashcroft is pictured on the Suisun Marsh with 
his trusty gun, faithful dog and agreeable com- 
panion enjoying the sport just before the bars 
go up. 



An army of hunters continued to go out every 
Sunday during the bad weather but they were re- 
warded with such small bags that lately many of the 
regulars have given up in disgust and have stuck 
close to home. Records kept by the Fish and Game 
Commission show that less ducks were killed this 
past season than in years before. Fact is, it may 
turn out to be the poorest season on record when 
the commission tallies up its figures. 

With but such a short space of time to get in some 
shots the outlook is not any brighter for ducks. The 
rains during the week brought more water to the 
flooded conditions and the regulars are going to have 
trouble getting at their birds. Parties that were out 
last Sunday and during the week reported poor sport 
as a rule and the season promises to go out with but 
little bombardment. 



Frederick J. Taylor, Ira Flint and Deforrest Rio, 
a trio of rabbit hunters, of Fulton, N. Y., recently 
captured a pink hare, the first that has been seen in 
the vicinity of Fulton for years. The hare was about 
the size of the ordinary large white, or snowshoe 
rabbit, except that its ears were much longer and 
the general shape of the animal more on the pattern 
of the western jackrabbit. The hound owned by Mr. 
Rio brought the hare around for Mr. Taylor's gun. 
It took the dog nearly two hours to put the rabbit in 
a circle. The hare is thought to be a cross between 
the western packrabbit and the snow-shoe rabbit. 

* * * * 

It is said that five hundred and twenty thousand 
new shotguns were sold in this country during 1915, 
which statement, if true, shows that hundreds upon 
hundreds of novices are yearly taking up field shoot- 
ing or trapshooting as a means of healthful recrea- 
tion. To be certain that the number is not over- 
stated, suppose we drop the extra twenty thousand, 
leaving the number at five hundred thousand, and 
the number still is immense and proves that few 
other lines of sport during the year had more con- 
verts. 

* * * « 

More than 1,000,000 silver trout eggs from Lake 
Whatcom were delivered at the Washington state 
hatchery at Walla Walla a few days ago. They com- 
pletely filled the hatchery. Superintendent S. D. 
Goodell announced that they will be hatched within 
a month and can be distributed next summer. 

* * * * 

Every county in the state of Utah is to have bird 
and game sanctuaries, where it will be unlawful to 
hunt and kill, even during the "open season," accord- 
ing to an announcement made recently by Fred W. 
Chambers, state fish and game commissioner. 

Under the commissioner's plan, which will be put 
into effect as rapidly as possible, between 250,000 
and 350,000 acres will be provided as permanent re- 
treats for feathered songsters, game birds of all 
kinds and animals — all wild things except predatory 
animals. 

In carrying out this state-wide scheme for the pres- 
ervation and propagation of birds and animals. Com- 
missioner Chambers is merely enlarging upon the 
movement he began in 1913. 

* V * * 

At the annual Christmas shoot of the Spokane 
(Wash.) Gun Club A. W. Woodworth broke 109 tar- 
gets out of 110 shot at, with an unfinished run of 
106. He missed his fourth target in the first 10- 
target event and then finished the 106 with a perfect 
score. 



Saturday, January 29, 1916.] 



THE BREEDER ANL 



SPORTSMAN 



Severe Winter Kills Quail by Hundreds 



HEARD IN KENNEL CIRCLES. 



Mayor Rolph ■will show along with his famous 
string of cocker spaniels at the coining Golden Gate 
Show a pair of English fox hounds. Being the only 
representatives of the breed on the Pacific Coast, 
they are bound to attract considerable attention. 
t t t 

Horace P. Beddeau, a well known local bulldog 
fancier, has purchased the crack Scottish terrier 
champion "El Sur the Laird" from A. J. Molera. The 
latter has the largest kennel of the breed on the 
Coast. 

t t t 

Mrs. Norwood B. Smith of the Cragwood kennels 
has sold a promising Scottish deerhound puppy to 
Fred B. McCav, of Cathav. California. 

t t t 

Mrs. E. F. Brown of the Browndale collie kennels 
is getting several blue-merle puppies in condition for 
the coming Golden Gate show. 

t t t 

Charles Lange, a member of the Empire Gun Club, 
has bred his pointer bitch and a litter is expected 
shortly. 

t t t 

H. M. Robertson of Pasadena is importing several 
Scottish terriers. They are big winners and are 
booked to arrive next week. Robertson, who is the 
owner of the largest boarding kennel in the South, 
has on hand nearly a hundred dogs. The best in the 
kennel will be sent up to the Golden Gate Show. 
t t t 

Mr. Vredenburgh, secretary of the American Ken- 
nel Club, with headquarters in New York, has been 
swamped with applications for registration since the 
new law went into effect. Ordinarily only about 9000 
dogs are registered in a year, but in the month of 
December alone there were 2,000 applications. The 
secretary is working all hours to catch up, but it 
will be some time before he gets order out of the 
chaos that exists. 

t t t 

Mrs. E. Green, who at one time exhibited some of 
the finest Scottish terriers ever seen on the bench, 
has just secured a splendid Maltese colored "Pom," 
weighing only three and one-half pounds. 

t t t 

W. Ballytine of Goldfleld, Nev., one of the largest 
breeders of English bulldogs in America, has just 
added another to his kennels. The name of the new 
dog is not available at present, but we understand it 
is one of the best to be had in England. 

t t t 

Colonel J. W. Dorsey had the misfortune to have 
his setter dow jump out of a window recently and 
both front legs were broken. He is being treated 
and the prospects are bright that he will be ready to 
work again next season. 

t t X 

Mrs. Tim Callopy is a recent convert to the toy 
fancy. She has purchased Dulce, a very fine bitch, 
from Mrs. Sinclair. Dulce is by Ch. Nemo Boy ex- 
Miss Dimples, and that Mrs. Callopy intends to start 
right is shown by the fact that already she has ar- 
ranged to breed Dulce to Brother Boy. 

X X X 

Mrs. C. H. Patterson's English setter Chiquita 
whelped eleven puppies. The sire is Ch. Manzanita. 
Mrs. Harry Witts recently bred her Lady Montez to 
Manzanita. 

X X X 

Mr. Chas. Hefferman, Stockton, Cal., reports a 
litter of seven, four dogs, whelped December 7, by 
Champion Baughfell Brif^r ex Rhoma of Mirasol, and 
a litter of seven, four dogs, whelped November 19, by 
Cyprus Cadet ex Crewe So Bonheur. 

t X X 

J. Nonnemacher of North Yakima, Wash., reports 
ten young Airedales by Cermer Dr. Cook. The Cer- 
mer Airedale Kennels have sold this fine young dog 
to S. D. Chestnut of Ft. Worth, Tex. The Cermer 
Kennels have also ten young ones by this dog. 
X X X 

Mrs. Maud Dickerson of Los Angeles has sold her 
Poodle, Little Fix-It II, and has added Maltese Ter- 
riers and Japanese Spaniels to her kennels. She 
bought a pair of Maltese from Mrs. Freerkser of 
Seattle. They are little dreams. Little Snowman 
went through from puppy to winners at Los Angeles 
last November. 

o 

A. D. Ferguson has accepted the position of special 
agent of the Fish and Game (,'ommission. The Fresno 
division will be abolished on March 1st and Ferguson 
will make his headquarters in San Francisco. On 
February first Kern county, formerly in the Fresno 
division, will come under the jurisdiction of the Los 
Angeles officials and the rest of the territory will 
be included in the San Francisco division. 

* * * * 

The Fish and Game Commission, according to an 
announcement by executive officer Ernest Schaeffle, 
is going to put a stricter watch on the bay to see 
that oil and acids are not dumped into the waters 
from the factories. It has been found that much of 
the oil which can be seen flooding the bay waters 
these days comes from the rain washing it off the 
streets, through the sewers to the bay. At the same 
time the authorities want to see that the factories 
obey he law. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



The severe winter being experienced in California 
this season is proving a hardship on wild fowl, quail 
especially. Reports from the Sierra-Nevadas are 
that quail are dying by the thousands because of 
the rigors of the cold weather and their inability to 
secure food. The Fish and Game Commission is 
working industriously to relieve the situation. Work 
has been progressing in distributing grain to the 
birds and looking after deer so as to conservate the 
,gam(\ and in order to handle the task on a large 
scale the commission has asked the State Board of 
Control for $.")00 to expend in that direction. 

George Nealc, in charge of the Sacramento divis- 
ion, gives some data on the subject that will be of 
interest to sportsmen. His letter follows: 



Fisher Hunt, Breeder and Sportsman: 

While in San Francisco at the office yesterday I 
promised to send you the names of the localities and 
about the approximate number of quail it has been 
necessary to feed at this time owing to the severe 
snow storms all over Northern California. Wherever 
possible, we are having our deputies attend to the 
feeding personally, both as to the purchasing and 
distribution of grain. Many sportsmen and other 
interested persons are contributing large quantities 
of wheat, many of them going to a great deal of trou- 
ble in carrying the feed on skis and snow shoes. 
Owing to the wide distribution of these birds it will 
be impossible to reach them all, but we are attempt- 
ing to save as large a percentage as possible. Owing 
to the last few mild winters the mountain quail have 
not shown a disposition to come down as low as they 
formerly did and many thousands which have re- 
mained above their natural elevation too long have 
become caught in the snow. 

Deputy R. C. O'Connor of Grass Valley reports 
large numbers of mountain quail near Grass Valley 
and Nevada City and is making his regular rounds on 
skis, feeding these birds. 

Deputy J. S. White of Redding states that large 
numbers of mountain quail are coming into the 
towns of Dunsmuir, Delta and to places north to 
Antler, also at the INIammoth Mine and north of Ken- 
nett. Large numbers are also hanging along the 
upper Sacramento river adjacent to the Southern 
Pacific railroad. Deputy White is feeding these birds 
from a hand car, making daily trips down the road 
and feeding them wherever necessary. He states that 
large numbers of deer can be seen swimming down 
the river to the snow line. Two of our men are 
very active in this vicinity, to protect the deer from 
being killed. He also states that the last rain on 



WINNER OF NATIONAL FIELD TRIALS. 



Press reports of the National Field trials held in 
the south last week are as follows: 

Grand Junction, Tenn., Jan. 21. — The pointer John 
Proctor, owned by A. L. Curtis of Belton, Tex., and 
the setter Medford Eugene entered by Dr. E. J. 
Haines of Medford, N. J., were rated by the judges 
tonight as the best of the ten dogs which competed 
in first series heats of the National Championship 
Association and will meet in a final race tomorrow 
for the title of national field trial champion. 

Grand Junction, Tenn., Jan. 22. — The pointer John 
Proctor, owned by A. L. Curtis of Belton, Tex., won 
the title of national champion in the final heat of the 
field trials of the national championship here today. 

Field trial events scheduled for the near future 
are : — 

Texas Field Trial Association, Cypress, Tex., Feb- 
ruary 4, 1916. X. A. Denny, secretary, 502 >4 Main 
street, Houston, Tex. 

Southwestern Field Trial Association, Vinita, Okla- 
homa, February 14, 1916. A. A. McKellop, secretary, 
1801 East Broadway, Muskogee, Okla. 

Washington Field Trial Club, Tacoma, Wash., Feb- 
ruary 21. F. E. King, secretary. 

Twelftli American Field Futurity, southern Illinois, 
November 2, 1916. 

o 

Calhoun, Ala.. January 25. — John Proctor, handled 
by (". H. Babcock, won the honors of the free-for-all 
slake of tlie National Field Trial club today. Last 
Saturday John Proctor won Ww national champion 
ship slake run at (!rand Junction, Tenn. 

Gibraltar Ollie. owned by (J. S. Parsons of Ken- 
neth, Maine; D. Solo Frank, owned by A. G. C. Sage 
of New York, and Lewis C. Morris, owned by B. J. 
Rowe of Birmingham, Alabania, all ran from the 
traces in the second series of the free-for-all stake. 
John Proctor's superiority in his footwork won for 
him. 

o 

FOX HUNTING NEAR LOS ANGELES. 



Fox hunting, heralded as the king of all outdoor 
sports, within thirty minutes' distance of the center 
of Los Angeles and almost at the edge of the city 
limits, is receiving the attention of sportsmen vis- 
itors from the East. 

One day last week Attorney Andrew Park, aided 
by his pack of foxhounds, captured one of the most 
liandsoincly-marked foxes ever taken in this State 
and brought his tally for fox hunting up to forty 
foxes. In speaking of the facilities for fox hunting 
in Southern California, Mr. Park said: 



the snow had the effect of freezing the surface so 
that the deer will be able to walk over the snow. 

Deputy Warren of Taylorsville reports the loss of 
large numbers of quail from exposure. Within the 
vicinity or neighborhood of Greenville there arc ap- 
proximately 2500 in one bunch and about 500 near the 
town of Quincy. These are all being cared for, both 
by voluntary contributions and grain is also being 
purchased by Warren. 

Deputy Cady of Susanville is feeding 500 mountain 
quail near that town. Several ranchers nearby are 
feeding about 1000 and report great loss from expos- 
ure and inability of the birds to secure gravel and 
grit. 

Deputy Streuber reports large numbers near 
Weed that need attention at once. They are being 
fed by Mr. Streuber. 

Mr. Albey is feeding 400 mountain quail in the 
vicinity of Weed, donating tlH> grain himself. 

Deputy Harris says that large numbers are coming 
into Hornbrook and feeding in the barn yards and 
gardens of the residents. 

Dr. Tinsman of Adin reports that between 2500 
and 3000 quail are on the Sherer place on Pit river, 
Modoc county. Owing to the inability of our deputy 
to reach the locality we have instructed Mr. Sherer 
to take care of these birds. 

J. S. Strinnett of Keddie reports many mountain 
quail dying from exposure. He is sending two men 
on skis with feed. 

Deputy Chester Scroggs of Loomis reports large 
numbers near Dutch Flat and is now carrying feed 
to them. 

We have other reports of the same character, all 
of which are being attended to wherever it is possible 
to reach the birds. 

Reports on the deer are more favorable. The deer 
were in a very fine condition and consequently can 
withstand exposure and loss of feed until they are 
able to get to the lower altitudes, where they can 
secure browse and other feed. 

All our mountain deputies state that this is the 
most severe winter on birds and animals in their 
long experience, many of them having becm born in 
the mountains where they are located. Fortunately, 
all are practical and experienced mountaineers. 

In connection with this we would say that the 
heavy fall of snow insures fine fishing for next sum- 
mer, although it may make the season rather late 
for first class fishing. 

Very truly yours, 

GEORGE NEALE, 
Assistant, Sacramento Division. 



"I am 60 years of age and have hunted foxes for 

more than forty years, from the coast of Georgia to 
the Pacific, and nowhere in America is there better 
sport than right at our door. The hills are literally 
alive with foxes. 

"Early yesterday morning, with a party of friends, 
we started a fox within fifty feet of my lodge, where 
my kennels are located, in the Benedict Canyon north 
of the Beverly Hills Hotel. The pack chased the 
fox a distance of probably fifty miles, up and down 
the canyon, the death occurring within 100 yards of 
the starting point. 

"I have been repeatedly asked to trap foxes for 
eastern estates, where the animal is almost extinct, 
and have had letters from all parts of the country 
asking about the fox-hunting conditions here. East- 
ern men are taking up land in the canyons north of 
the city for the purpose of having a place to follow 
the hounds. Los Angeles is the only place in the 
world that I know of where one can step off a trolley 
car and find a multitude of foxes." 

Mr. Park has a kennel of sixteen hounds, five old 
dogs and the remainder yearlings, all excelh-nt hunt- 
ers. With this pack the hunters go out and when a 
fox is found the dogs are unleashed and the hunt is 
on. The California fox is one of the most artful in 
the world and it generally requires from two to three 
hours to run him down. While not so large as the 
eastern red fox, the marking is similar and the ani- 
mal has more evasive tricks than his eastern brother. 
He has one point in common with all other foxes, 
however, and that is h(> always returns to his lair 
when capture seems certain, and the death generally 
occurs within a short distance of the starting point. 

The fox pack owned by Mr. Park is also well adap- 
ted to hunt coyot(>s, and when more strenuous sport 
than fox hunting is desired the parly goes farther 
afield, knowing that an entire day will be consumed 
in the chase. 

o 

The Spokane (Wash.) Gun Club has begun a series 
of handicap shoots, for which diamond medals will 
be given. Thirteen contests will be conducted, run- 
ning through the months of January, February and 
March. It is necessary for a contestant to partici- 
pate in nine of the events in order to be eligible for 
a prize. 

• • • * 

The Widgeon Club, which has one or two members 
in Tulare, has refused to buy back the land in the 
Tulare lake region formerly used for hunting 
grounds and decided to procure new grounds. The 
original ground was bought from his brother club 
members by Kenneth Sworder of Hanford and he 
offered to sell it back at an advanced price. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 29, 1916. 



I Sportsmen's Row 1 

.-....-..gj 

All the old guard are wondering if Henry Stelling 
is still on the Reno Boat. No one has seen him 
since last season. Maybe he fell overboard. 

* * * * 

As John Potter has killed his limit of ducks so 
many times this winter the club handicapper is con- 
sidering the 23 yard mark for John. 

» * * * 

Frank Webster is going to be as busy as a bird 
dog again this year between the Golden Gate, San 
Leandro and the Bay View clubs. No wonder Frank 
won the Golden Gate consecutive trap trophy. 
■* * * * 

Bud Vallejo will try to pin another Challenge Cup 
to his collection this year. He has the best wishes 
of all the boys. 

* * * * 

Ben Baum has been working with a Try Gun. 
Wonder what the old vet is doing? 

* * * * 

Our friend Pete Ashcroft, who is manager of the 
Golden Gate Club, is more than anxious to get back 
in harness again. 

* * * * 

Clarence Haight can be sighted almost any morn- 
ing out in the Richmond District pointing his shoot- 
ing iron at the little birdies from his bedroom 
window. 

* * * * 

Big Fred Willet is going to show the boys what a 
good 20-gauge will do to the blue rocks when the 
season opens. 

* * * * 

Edgar Forester has so many shells left at his 
duck shack that if the blue rock season don't open 
soon he will have to visit a warehouse. 

* » * * 

Sam Bernard says he wishes the gang would shoot 
more and talk le.ss. Sam likes to see the game. 

* * 4: ^ 

Henry and Emil Kleversahl ought to break records 
this season, judging from the number of ducks they 
brought down. 

* * * * 

If A. G. Wilkes improves on his last season's rec- 
ords the club will enter him in the American Han- 
dicap. 

* * * * 

Bud Havens says that Friend Howard will have to 
go some this season or he will find himself in Bud's 
game bag. 

* * * * 

With his wonderful advantage of gun reach and 
pointing ability, Mr. Peet should be in the champion- 
ship class. 

* * * * 

The boys will miss Col. E. R. Cuthbert but Lieut. 
Townsend Whelen will gain some shooting partner 
if they meet in Panama. 

* * * * 

A new illustrated publication, The American 
Shooter, made its initial appearance on January 15. 
It is published on the first and fifteenth of each 
month and will be devoted to shooting. The Amer- 
ican Shooter is to be complimented on its first issue 
as it is well illustrated, written and edited. Stoney 
McLinn, a former sporting writer of Philadelphia, is 
the editor. The American Shooter is published in 
Baltimore. 

* * • * 

L. D. Hawxhurst, a scatter gun artist, showed the 
crack rifle men last season that if Uncle Sam needs 
marksmen the Golden Gate Club will furnish Len. 

* * * * 

Bill Varien, the little phenom of Pacific Grove, has 
the shooters guessing as to his intentions. Why he 
fills his gunstock with five pounds of lead is to hold 
the gun to his shoulder — or is it to keep Bill's feet 
on the platform? 

* » * ♦ 

Jim Brickell will make the boys in the Family 
Club sit up when he lays his face on that Monte 
Carlo stock of his. 

* * * * 

Andy Flickinger of Vallejo showed the crack shots 
back East what could be done with a doughnut on 
his pump muzzle when he shot in the Grand Amer- 
ican. 

* * * * 

Our own D. W. King, known to the Coast as the 
"Fudge King," has found a cure for flinching, judging 
from his wonderful scores of late. What's the pre- 
scription, D. W.? 

* * * * 

Harry Ricklefson, the well known old time Bay 
View booster, now located in British Columbia for 
the Red W., called on the shooters last week. It was 
good for the eyes to see him around looking so well. 

* * * * 

Charles Hollywood, Bob Valleau, Homer Craig and 
Al Durney were up to the Mud Hen Club at Alvarado 
last Sunday and got some birds, but not many. 

* * * * 

Henry Toft, marshal at South City, Dr. Dolly and 
Mr. Russie made a trip to Gustine during the week 
but found every place flooded. They were rewarded 
with only eighteen ducks among them for the long 
automobile ride, 



Rube Haas has been getting his share of the ducks 
this season and it augurs well for some high scores 
at the traps. 

* * * * 

Officers George Wallenschlager and, MacDonald 
shot a limit each at Mt. Eden one day during the 
week. They report ducks plentiful but hard to decoy. 
Mac says they are wise to the stools. 

* * * * 

F. D. Putzard, Roy Taber, John Rewin and Pete 
Retell secured limit bags at Dorris. The birds were 
mostly mallards and honkers. 

* * * * 

George Boehm, Leo Cuneo, Dolph Sorrila, Silna 
Lagamarcino and E. Klensahl had a successful shoot 
last Saturday at Hog Island. 

* * * * 

E. Reed Shaner, secretary of the Interstate Asso- 
ciation, has announced that gun clubs intending to 
apply for registered tournaments in the course of the 
fiscal year will receive literature explaining the 1916 
policy of the organization, and application blanks, 
this month. 



Charles Jedeau went hunting last week and killed 
a robin. It proved a costly bird. He was haled 
before a magistrate at Cloverdale and was fined fifty 
dollars, as the robin is a protected bird. So is a 
yellow hammer, under the name of "flicker." Ernest 
Curein did not kiiow it, and when he shot one of the 
birds he was arrested and fined twenty-five dollars. 
Peter Uicoletti also went hunting, and without a 
license. For this he was fined forty dollars. When 
the magistrate also learned that Peter had killed 
robins, too, he added forty-five dollars to the fine. 
The trio were arrested near the Italian-Swiss Colony 
by Deputy Game Commissioners A. L. Lea and Paul 
Smith. They paid up. 

The deputies are to be commended for making the 
arrests. All song birds are protected and no true 
sportsman wants to see them butchered for the table. 

o 

BRUNER WINS IN SHOOT-OFF. 



The inevitable happened Sunday morning at the 
Vernon Gun Club, when the twelfth fifty-bird handi- 
cap was .';laged for the W. H. Wilshire trophy and a 
second leg was annexed by one of the eleven con- 
tenders who have already won a leg on the prize. 

The strain was getting too great and had to be 
broken. Stanton A. Bruner, shooting from the 
twenty-yard mark, not only broke the strain, but 
broke forty-eight targets and tied with Dr. Fred 
Fitzgerald, who also fired from the twenty-yard 
range. In the shoot-off Fitzgerald dropped five birds 
and had to be contented with a 20x25 score, but 
Bruner broke twenty-three out of the frame and won 
his second leg. 

The shoot-off was quite exciting, both shooting 
even until the tenth bird was thrown. Both missed 
this. However, Fitzgerald missed the next one, 
which was shattered by Bruner. Two more were 
missed by Bruner in the last ten, and three got away 
from Fitzgerald. 

Manderville, L. C. Forest, Bill Dougherty, W. C. 
Poor and "Pop" Bruner constituted the first squad 
that went to the traps, and they went to the traps in 
the rain. About twenty shooters were on hand at the 
start, but as soon as the sun came out around noon 
there was an even thirty shooters entered in the 
trophy competition. 

Many good scores were made in both the trophy 
shoot and practice, competition. Fred Grewell was 
high gun on the first hundred, with ninety-five targets 
squelched. His run without a miss was forty-eight. 
Grewell was second high gun in the Wilshire shoot, 
breaking forty-seven from eighteen yards. 

A sweepstake shoot among the club's cracks fol- 
lowed the day's program and in a squad of seven 
competitors five of them broke twenty-four out of the 
frame of twenty-five. In a squad composed of Dr. 
Fitzgerald, Stanton Bruner, Frank Melius, Dr. Pack- 
ard and R. L. Hall, 121 birds met their fate at the 
hands of the quintet out of 125 thrown. 

Ed Hedderly w'as easily the small-bore champion 
of the day, breaking forty-seven out of fifty with a 
20-gauge gun, and he used No. 8 shot at that. 

Several high runs were recorded, Selby and Ed 
Mitchell scored a 47 straight; Harry Cline, 25; 
Moody, 24; Fitzgerald, 25, and Melius, 38. 

The scores follow : 

Wilshire handicap of fifty targets: 

INIanderville, 16 yards, broke 39; L. C. Forrest, 
17—45; W. T. Dougherty, 17—40; A. W. Bruner, 16— 
43; Fullerton, 17—40; W. Robinson, 17—37; Kees, 
16—36; F. Grewell, 18—42; F. Melius, 20—45; Tuck- 
ett, 18—41; W. Pugh, 18—44; White, 18—41; S. A. 
Bruner. 20—48; W. H. Wilshire, 17—44; R. L. Hall, 
20—45; Dr. Fitzgerald, 20—48; P. Peterson, 18—38; 
H. Cline, 17 — tl: Lou Melius, 18—43; C. W. Clem- 
ent, 16—39; C. E. Groat, 16—36; Dr. Packard, 20— 
44; T. P. Smith, 17—41; G. Persinger, 16—42; J. W. 
Meeks, 16—40. 

Practice shooting: Clement 45x50, C. E. Groat 
36x50, Dr. Packard , C. Moody 24x25, F. M. Bock- 
way 10x25, Hedderly 23x25, George Cline 20x25, Ed. 
Mitchell 25x25, Manderville 37x50. L. C. Forest 42x50, 
W. T. Dougherty 63x75, W. E. Poor 51x75, A. W. 
Bruner 40x50, Fullerton 66x75, W. Robinson 38x50, 
Kees 22x50. Fred Grewell 48x50, F. R. Melius 73x75, 
Tuckett 59x75, Pugh 44x50, White 24x25, S. A. Bruner 
44x50, Wilshire 42x50, R. L. Hall 73x75. Fitzgerald 
25x25. Peterson 45x50. Harry Cline 43x50, L. Melius 
59x75. 



INTERCLUB GALLERY RIFLE COMPETITION 



Quite a few Pacific Coast teams are competing in 
the National Interclub Gallery competition. The week 
ending January 8th. Bucyrus team of Ohio led in 
class A. with a score of 991. No Coasters are en- 
tered in this class. In class B. Watertown, South 
Dakota, is in front with 988. Ogden, Utah, ranks 
seventh with a tally of 981 and Tacoma, Wash., is 
twelfth with 946. In class C. the returns of the 
Olympic Club of San Francisco had not been re- 
ceived and St. Paul, Minn., led by a score of 982. No 
local aggregations are in the class D. competition. 

o 

MANY MARKSMEN AT SHELL MOUND. 



William F. Blase, world-champion rifle shot and 
king of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition 
shooting tournament, beat all competitors with a 
phenomenal score of 236 in the Golden Gate Rifle 
and Pistol Club monthly medal shoot. 

The leading shooting societies of the bay district 
were fully represented by their best talent on the 
Shell Mound range Sunday. Conditions favored ac- 
curate aim. and the results of the day's practice 
proved very satisfactory. Following were the prin- 
cipal scores: 

Golden Gate Rifle and Pistol Club, monthly rifle 
scores— W. F. Blasse. 233. 236; Ben Jonas. 215. 212. 
214; E. Schierbaum. 213, 220. 222. 221. 214, 227; 
M. W. Housner. 215, 218, 219, 212, 228; A. H. Millett, 
174, 183. 175. 154; M. F. Blasse. 216. Pistol scores: 
C. T. Sisson, 84, 80, 87; J. J. Currier, 87, 86; C. W. 
Whaley, 85, 87; W. C. Prichard, 94, 95. 94. 90. 96, 92, 
91; R. Mills, 91, 94. 94, 94. 

* * * * 

San Francisco Schuetzen Verein, monthly medal 
shoot — First expert class, George A. Pattberg, 230; 
Otto A. Bremer, 222. Expert class, A. Hubner, 207; 
champion class. H. Luneburg. 220; first class. P. F. 
Rathjens, 206 Lieutenant A. Westphal, 194; second 
class. .John de Wit. 180, 176; third class, J. F. Mues, 
206, W..H. Schuldte, 135; fourth class, P. F. Rulffs, 
172, 172. 

* * * * 

Germania Schuetzen Club monthly bullseye shoot — 
John de Wit 204, M. F. Blasse 209, Herman Huber 
249, N. Ahrens 533, B. P. Jonas 817, George A. Patt- 
berg 939. W. F. Blasse 1036, E. Hoffmann 1066, Otto 
A. Bremer 1257, G. C. Post 1461, G. C. Gunther 1598. 

* * * * 

San Francisco Schuetzen Verein monthly bullseye 
shoot: Otto A. Bremer 355, Otto Lemeke 412, George 
A. Pattberg 762, J. F. Mues 744, H. Luneburg 853. 
Lieutenant A. Westphal 1130, John de Wit 1257. 
Henry Bernholdt 1278, E. Hoffmann 1305, William 
Dressier 1234. Captain John D. Heise 1342, P. H. 
Rulffs 1345. A. Bertelsen 1400, P. F. Rathjens 1548, 
A. Huber 1753, F. Brandt 1900. Charles Oldag 2460, 
F. Atzeroth 2540. W. H. Schulte 2796. 

* * * 4: 

Veterans National Guard of California monthly 
rifle shoot: F. P. Poulter 46, C. Meyer 45, Captain 
John E. Klein 44, E. H. Slitor 43, H. C. Mayer 36. 

* * * * 

Redmen Schuetzen Company, monthly medal shoot: 
Champion class — W. Dressier 204, O. E. Rosberg 
200. C. G. Strippel 190; first class— J. Schmidt 186. 
M. Fuetscher 180: second class. A. Root 170; third 
class, A. Hugh 169; fourth class, R. Schnelle 150, 
F. Hoffman 148, .John Archut 125. 

First best shot, A. Hughli 20; last best shot, J. 
Schmidt 24. 

Bullseye scores— J. Schmidt 600, A. Hugli 700, W. 
Dressier 741, C. G. Strippel 760, O. E. Rosberg 763, 
M. Fuetscher 769, J. Hoffman 800, R. Schnelle 810, 
A. Avot 850, J. Prackel 860, John Arschut 920. 

* * * * 

San Francisco Turner Schuetzen monthly ring 
shoot— H. Schulz 214, 206; C. Tidball 156, 144; Carl 
Abraham 194, 198; H. KKiffel 188, 197; Herman Enge 
195, 185; E. Fleischer 171, 149. 

o 

AIREDALE SAVES SOLDIERS ON BORDER. 



Sergeant R. H. Fowler, U. S .A., who is on duty 
down along the Texas border, writes that he has six 
of his Airedales with him, and has had great sport 
hunting cat, both bob and leopard, and coon. Ser- 
geant Fowler writes us about a fight on the border, 
in which a handful of United States soldiers stood 
off over a hundred Mexican bandits for several hours, 
the American boys being armed with nothing but 
revolvers. One of the participants in this fight later 
wrote the following letter to Sergeant Fowler, which 
will prove interesting to Airedale fanciers: "Friend 
Fowler: I am in the hospital at San Antonio: got 
plugged in three places in the fight at Ojo del Agua, 
one of them through the arm, hence this bum look- 
ing letter. Bonnie, the Airedale bitch you sent me, 
woke me up just before the firing, or they would have 
riddled me. She comes in use shortly and I want to 
send her up to you to breed to Rex. St. Mayo was 
interviewing me about Airedales for the army and I 
have referred him to you. Adios. — Smith." The 
writer. Sergeant H. R. Smith of the Signal Corps, 
was in charge of the wireless station at Ojo del 
Agua, the night of the attack, in which four American 
soldiers were killed and several wounded. Had it 
not been for the timely alarm given by the Airedale, 
the chances are that the small number guarding the 
wireless would have been wiped out. — Kennel Re- 
view, 



Saturday. January 29. 1916.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



n 



Troubles of Pat and His Cub Bear 



TRAPSHOOTING FROM AN AEROPLANE. 



There was a time when one had to be a member 
of a sun club in order to enjoy the benefits of trap- 
shooting. That was in the days before the hand trap 
came into use. Now "the sport alluring" is enjoyed 
on the water and in the air, as well as on Mother 
Earth. 

A. B. Thaw, the aviator, has had a hand trap 
attached to his aeroplane, and. with a companion 
and his scattergun. he takes even more delight in 
shooting at the blue rocks as the airship whizzes a 
mile a minute through the air than he did when the 
pleasure was hiy on terra firma. 

It is no easy matter to smash the targets with a 
gun from a fast-flying airship. It requires a good 
eye and steady nerves to pulverize the clay boys 
when standing before the traps, but it requires bet- 
ter aim and even steadier nerves to hit the targets 
from a fast-moving airship. 

Mrs. Frank E. Butler (Annie Oakley) became cog- 
nizant of this fact while on a recent visit to one of 
the aviation stations of Uncle Samuel near Atlantic 
City, N. J. After inspecting the aeroplanes Mrs. 
Butler was induced to demonstrate the possibilities 
of trapshooting from an airship. A hand trap was 
fastened to the flier to throw the targets straight 
ahead. Mrs. Butler found that it was necessary to 
shoot very quickly, as the airship, going so fast in 
the same direction as the target, would sometimes 
pass it before she had time to get perfect aim. 

The hand trap has revolutionized trapshooting. It 
makes it possible to shoot nearly anywhere. When 
the U. S. S. Solace went tlirough the Panama Canal 
to the Panama-Pacific Exposition it carried a number 
of hand traps, so that the officers and men could 
enjoy the sport while on the water. 

licidentally, many hundreds of private yachts, and 
even some ocean greyhounds, have been equipped 
with hand traps. Seldom does a steamship put out 
from any port these days without a supply of hand 
traps and targets. The clear background and the 
absence of anything that would tend to direct the 
attention of the shooter and the wide scope of space 
permitted offer ideal conditions for the sport. Con- 
ditions are just as good in the air, but the task of 
breaking ttie target is much more difficult. 

A trapshooting tournament that was novel, to say 
the least, was recently conducted by the Edgewater 
Gun Club of Toledo, O. It was an international 
aqair, in which 1.5 nations were represented, or in 
other words, 15 overseas countries. 

Any organization that can get Germans and Eng- 
lish together these days with guns in their hands 
without shooting each other undertakes a big task, 
but that is what the Toledo club did, and got away 
with it in fine shape. Squads of five men represented 
each of these countries: England, Germany, France, 
Ireland, Hungary, Austria, Italy, Sweden, Denmark, 
Poland, Russia, Greece, Scotland and China, and 
there was one delegation that didn't have a flag, a 
Hebrew team. 

Don't overlook the mention of China having a team 
in the cosmopolitan competition. Very few can rec- 
oncile a Chinaman with a gun, but they were right 
there. It was no doubt the first time a Chinese team 
ever appeared before the traps. The Celestials, all 
young men, were quick to learn the ways of the 
greatest American sport. So if you pick up a news- 
paper one of these days and see these five names in 
the summary do not feel alarmed, for they are O. K. 
in every respect. Here are the names: Henry Yee, 
Louie Quong, Henry Get, John Sew . and Edward 
Keota. 

As far as we could ascertain, all the shooting was 
confined to the regulation attacks upon the "blue 
rocks," but the spectators, if not the contestants, 
must now and then have had in mind the possibilities 
of an interchange of hostilities in imitation of the all- 
comers' grapple on the other side of the pond — but 
the influence of trapshooting is always toward peace 
and good-fellowship. 

The Edgewater club in this many nationalities' 
shoot provided an attraction such as Americans 
never before witnessea, mid drew an immense audi- 
ence, but the greatest thing they did was to demon- 
strate the fundamental democracy of America, and 
it may be that trapshooting will act always as a 
rallying point around which this democracy may 
continually be exemplified. 

Trapshooting is steadily growing in popularity as 
a feature in country club life. Organizations perfect- 
ed for the development of other sports are turning 
to trapshooting for an all-year-round pastime. This 
is but natural, as "the sport alluring" attracts all 
those fond of outdoor pleasures. 

The Baltsurol Golf Club of Newark, N. J., is the 
latest country club to promote trapshooting among 
its members. The Baltsurol ('lub is staging weekly 
and monthly handicap tournaments, and from a mod- 
est beginning in point of entries the list is being 
lengthened each week. 

Some years ago the New York Athletic Club went 
into trapshooting on an extensive scale at its coun- 
try home in Travers Island, and now quite a lot of 
the yacht and country clubs in and around New 
York have all the modem trapshooting appliances. 

One of the largest country clubs interested in trap- 
shooting is the Pinehurst f'ountry Club, at Pine- 
hurst, N. C. From the 17th to the 21st of January 
this organization conducted a handicap tournament, 
its ninth annual affair, and behind the traps on those 
days enough wealth will be represented to make 
Croesus poor in comparison. This is a national shoot 
and attracts men in every walk of life. — Peter P. 
Carney, Phil. Public Ledger. 



There is a saying about the bear family which is 
very, very true. You may have heard it before! it 
is "that there is never any telling what a bear will, 
or will not do." You may have heard this saying, 
and yet do not believe it — well, Patrick O'Leary was 
that way — once. 

Pat first met the cup one evening in the early sum- 
mer, over on the edge of his clearing. Strangely 
enough, the cub and Patrick both made the same 
mistake. They each underestimated the other. The 
cub. then about as large as a fox terrier, had strayed 
away from its mother, and, on seeing Patrick, it 
came to the conclusion that all it had to do to escape 
was to climb a small tamarack sapling. The old 
she bear could not have been far distant anyway, 
but this world wise infant did not for one instant 
bother about calling to her. Self-confident, self- 
reliant, up the sapling went the cub. 

Patrick's mistake may have been more pardonable, 
but personally he did not see how one small cub up 
a shaky sapling could injure a big strong man with 
a rope over his arm. Ten minutes later, the cub 
safely trussed up on the ground, Pat might have mod- 
ified this last statement, or might even have admit- 
ted that for its size there was a great deal of sharp 
claws and sharper teeth about the cub. 

However he did neither — instead, he carried the 
cub across to his cabin; which really brings me to 
the beginning of my story. 

After a few minutes' work, the cub, whimpering 
softly, was chained up to a box in one corner of the 
shack, and was left to its own devices and a saucer 
of milk. I am not going to tell you that it instantly 
upset the milk, because you will have already guessed 
that. After watching the cub's struggles for a few 
minutes in order to make certain that the captive 
was securely chained, Patrick took down his rifle 
and went out into the gathering dusk to try and 
find the old bear. 

The finding itself was not dramatic. Pat went 
sneaking round one corner of his stable, and the 
bereaved mother went sneaking round the other. The 
two met on the corner. Pat stiffened in his tracks. 
The bear rose up in hers, and looking very big and 
black in the waning light, started to advance on 
her hind legs. 

There was a sound very much like that made by 
a rifle dropping to the ground — an expression very 
like "Well!" — (only it wasn't!), and the next instant 
the man was sprinting for his cabin. 

It was a magnificent race. Indeed, it was such 
a close finish that as soon as he had the door 
slammed to and locked, Pat turned round to be sure 
that the old bear wasn't in the room with him. 

He heard her stamping about outside, and felt 
a bit easier; then he felt himself, and found that he 
still had a whole skin, though for the life of him he 
could not remember what he had done with his rifle. 

"By Gosh," he said, after a few minutes spent in 
deep thought, "madder'n a whole ncstful of hornets." 
And he swore, and repeated "By Gosh" several times. 

Presently the old bear came back to the cabin, and 
put her nose down to the crack in the doorway, and 
went "snoof, snoof, snoof, snoof, sniff!" for several 
minutes. Pat says she did it for several hours, but 
then ! 

On hearing her the cub started whining and wail- 
ing, and the old she-bear grew madder than before. 
She tried to push the door in, but Pat put the table 
up against it; ii was a solidly made door else she 
would have ripped it to pieces. Next she tried the 
windows, but they proved to be too high from the 
ground; nor could she get on to the roof, else this 
story might have been a tragedy. 

Finally, hearing no sound, Pat opened the door, 
and very gingerly stuck his head outside. The old 
bear saw him and came for the cabin at the gallop. 
Pat was pretty badly scared as he barricaded the 
door up again, wondering vaguely even as he did so, 
what the bear had been doing over at the barn. 

As a matter of fact the old bear had been amusing 
herself tearing up some sacks of pig feed she had 
found there. She was so absolutely and thoroughly 
mad that destruction in its worst form was the only 
thing that appealed to her. For awhile she tri(>d to 
get into the cabin by digging away the earth from 
underneath it, but the soil was too full of big boul- 
ders and she did not accomplish much, beyond ruin- 
ing Pat's flower garden. All the tini(\ too, she could 
hear the cub, mourning and grieving inside the cabin, 
and this, you may be sure, did not put her in any 



NOTES GATHERED HERE AND THERE. 



George W. Courtwright, deputy fish and game com- 
missioner at Canby, Modoc county, is receiving 
treatment at the State hygienic laboratory in Berke- 
ley as a result of being blten by a rabid dog in the 
streets of Alturas. 

The dog attacked Courtwright and bit him on one 
leg. The head of the animal was sent to the labora- 
tory for examination. It was determined the animal 
was rabid. 

With ten minutes -to spare, Courtwright caught a 
train out of Alturas. The train was stalled in the 
snow and Courtwright was three days In reaching 
Berkeley. He will take treatment for twenty-five 
days. 

* * * * 

The preliminary examination of Robert Locke, 
Stanton Wiliams, William Chaney and Elgin Donald- 



the better temper. And so the siege went on. 

Pal's only firearm was the rifle; and the old bear 
had already made that look more like a railway acci- 
dent than a Winchester. Once he lit the lamp, but 
Pat swears with his hand on his heart that the old 
bear came back and started throwing rocks at the 
windows; and so he sat in darkness. 

Why didn't he let the cub go, and so end it all. 
The only reasons I can give are. firstly, a streak of 
obstinacy in his nature, and secondly, an advertise- 
nuMit in a paper. Pat had discovered this advertise- 
ment a week or two before; the paper itself had 
come into his life on the outside of a cheese. Briefly 
the advertisement staled that, for quick delivery, a 
Mr. William Migley would pay J.'iO for a live unin- 
jured black bear cub. It had surprised Pat. 

"By Gosh." he had said. "Fifty dollars for a b'ar 
cub. I ain't never got more'n ten dollars before." 
This partly explains why Pat had taken the rope 
across to the edge of the clearing with him; and I 
think it entirely explains why he didn't let the cub 
go. It wants a very strong heart to release fifty of 
the best after having them tied up in a corner of 
your cabin. 

The night wore on. Pat could still hear the old 
bear occasionally — once she knocked against an 
empty coal oil can over by the barn, and once she 
came and "snoof-snoofed" at the door again. 

The cub, too, had quieted down, and no longer 
strained and tugged at its tether. It seemed to be 
asleep, though Pat fancied that it was sobbing softly 
to itself. 

Pat himself must have dozed, for of a sudden he 
was on his feet, the sweat breaking out on his fore- 
head. Then came another awful s(iuealing scream 
and then, after what seemed an eternity, 
another, and by that Pat knew that his pig pen was 
demolished, and that his pigs were beyond all earthly 
aid. Witli black rage in his heart he awaited the 
dawn. 

It came at long last. There was no comfort in the 
thought that the cub whining in his corner was worth 
half a hundred dollars; nor was there, I fear, very 
much profit in it now. 

By and by, when it was fully light, Pat looked out 
of the window, and saw the old bear rooting up his 
garden. The madness in her had not yet gone down, 
and even as he watched, the bear left the garden, 
and started pulling the shacks off the side of his 
hay barn. 

There was no rage left in Pat's heart now, only a 
dull wonder as to what the end could be. Fascinated, 
he still watched; he saw the she-bear come back 
to the ruined pig sty, and drag away one of the car- 
casses into the brush. This she repeated until she 
had disposed of all three bodies. Personally I think 
she buried them, for Patrick never found them. 

The end came with great suddenness. Lying on 
the floor was the cheese scented paper containing 
the advertisement that was the cause of all the 
trouble. Pat picked it up, read Mr. Migly's offer over 
again, then idly glanced over the rest of the paper. 

Suddenly, with an exclamation he was on his feet. 
He strode across the cabin, and seizing the protest- 
ing cub by the back of its neck, so that it could 
neither bite nor scratch, Pat most soundly boxed its 
ears. Followed a wild wailing and squealing; and 
back came the outraged mother. 

Pat's mind was mad(^ up. He unchained the squeal- 
ing cub, and sent it flying through the window just 
as the old bear came charging at the door. Her 
cub restored to her, the old bear quieted down at 
once. She made a bee line for the brush, the cub 
following at her heels. Pat, standing at the open 
doorway, watched them .go. 

"Tak(> your cub, durn you," he said, "though you 
ain't left me much but ruin,' 'and as the bears reached 
the protecting brush he raised his voice, and shouted 
his last farewell: "And that advertisement was three 
years old, anyway!" He says the old bear looked 
back at him and grinned! 

Now these are simple facts of the case. Person- 
ally I believe them. You may not. This Is a free 
country. 

But whether you do believe them, or whether you 
don't, for the love of little fishes don't ever try to 
josli I'atrick O'Leary about bears. He's got a new 
rifl(>, and if you were to try and buy a bear cub of 
him — well, my gracious— he'll fill you so full of holes, 
your skin could be used for a sieve. — H. C. Iladdon, 
in Rod and Gun. 



son, charged with killing deer out of season and 
having the meat in their possession, is up before 
Justice Mulroy. The arrests were made by Game 
Warden O'Connor near Nevada CUy who was accom- 
panied to the scene by Deputy Sheriff Young. 

The young men have been living at the old House- 
man place, about three miles beyond that city. They 
denied any knowledge of the killing of deer at first, 
but when 100 pounds of deer meat was found in the 
cejiar they said that one member of the party had 
killed a buck, showing the antlers to prove their 
story. Game Warden O'Connor however, maintained 
that the meat was a doe, and that the animal was 
killed within a week. This story the young men 
deny. All are charged with the crime, as It was 
shown that all had partaken of the meal. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



IS 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 29, 1916. 



THE FARM 



a- 



THE CONTROL. OF SOIL WASHING 



Soil washing is the greatest single 
.source of loss on many rolling lands. 
It is greater than the loss of plant food 
through cropping. The washing off of 
the surface soil during a single season 
may remove as much organic matter 
as will be replaced by the turning un- 
der of two or three clover crops. A 
single rain may form gullies which it 
will require years to repair. And the 
injury to the land itself is only a part 
of the story. The filling of our smaller 
streams with silt and the great in- 
jury that is done navigation by the 
clogging of our large water courses 
with this eroded material is another 
very important phase of the subject, 
when the country as a whole is con- 
sidered. The present season has cer- 
tainly emphasized, in the minds of all 
observing farmers, the great havoc 
which is caused by soil washing. 

There would be little need of calling 
attention to these matters if it were 
not for the fact that a large share of 
such damage is preventable. The greai 
need of soil conservation is more 
strongly emphasized each year and in 
no way is greater care needed than 
in the prevention of soil erosion. While 
it is a very serious national problem. 



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it is a matter over which the govern- 
ment or the state has little control. 
It is a problem for the individual land 
owner. Public sentiment should be 
awakened to the seriousness of the 
problem and the land owner brought 
to realize the importance of persistent 
efforts of control. 

KINDS OF WASHING. 
There are two kinds of soil washing 
■ — sheet washing and gullying. Sheet 
washing is the washing of the im- 
mediate surface soil without the form- 
ation of appreciable gullies. This is 
loss noticeable than gullying, but al- 
most as injurious, since it removes al- 
most as large amounts of soil of the 
best surface layers, including large 
quantities of organic matter. Gullying 
has the disadvantage of leaving the 
field rough and a gully once started 
continues to enlarge unless remedial 
measures are adopted. Sheet wash- 



may be entirely removed on the steep- 
er slopes. If the plowing is deep, 
most, if not all, of the water will be 
absorbed and washing greatly de- 
creased. 

Insufficient Organic Matter. — One of 

the important causes contributing to 
washing is a low supply of organic 
matter in the soil. Soils with much 
oi-ganic matter absorb the water more 
rapidly and the organic matter also 
tends to bind the particles together 
and prevent washing. For this reason 
old lands, low in organic matter, wash 
worse than new lands. Likewise com 
land prepared from stubble ground 
washes worse than corn land prepared 
from sod. 

Clay Soil Absorbs Water Slowly. — 
The texture of the soil is also an im- 
portant factor in determining the 
amount of washing. A sandy soil ab- 
sorbs water rapidly and washes very 




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ing is most common in freshly tilled 
land, such as corn land, where on 
sharp slopes as much as an inch of 
the best surface soil may be removed 
during a single heavy rain. The gully- 
ing usually starts in tilled land but 
unless stopped continues indefinitely. 
CAUSES OF SOIL WASHING. 
As long as land is kept in timber or 
in thick growing vegetation, as in its 
virgin state, the rate of surface loss 
from the average soil by erosion, is 
less than the rate of accumulation by 
rock weathering. When the land is 
put in cultivation, erosion is greatly 
increased and the rate of loss is then 
far greater than the rate of soil forma- 
tion. It is, however, when the land is 
in tilled crops that the greatest loss 
occurs. Every farmer realizes the 
washing which accompanies corn- 
growing. 

Careless Culture. — Careless culture 
is undoubtedly productive of the great- 
est losses. Where washes once start 
they invariably become worse rather 
than better if the land is kept in cul- 
tivation. 

Shallow Plowing. — Shallow plowing 
ii- one of, the causes of washing which 
us-ually accompanies careless farming. 
Where land is plowed shallow the 
water quickly penetrates to the depth 
of this loose soil and if tlie rain contin- 
ues to fall more rapidly than it can be 
absorbed by the compact soil beneath, 
the run-off will carry with it sofe of 
this loose surface soil. If the rainfall 
is very heavy the shallow surface soil 



little. A clay soil, on the other hand, 
absorbs water slowly and is particu- 
larly subject to gullying. The inter- 
mediate soils such as fine sandy loams 
and silts are most affected by sheet 
washing but they will also gully badly. 

Frequent Heavy Rains. — Probably 
the most important single cause of 
soil washing is the occurrence of fre- 
quent torrential rains, particularly 
when the land is being cultivated. A 
continental climate, such as that 
found in Missouri, must invariably 
have a rainfall of unequal distribution, 
with many torrential rains, and there- 
fore a greater amount of serious soil 
erosion than occurs in those regions 
more favorably situated in this re- 
spect. 

CONTROLLING WASHING. 

In controlling washing, as in con- 
trolling disease, preventive measures 
are more important than remedies. 
Where washing has already taken 
place, of course remedial measures 
alone are left. If the washing has 
been long continued, however, the 
remedies are costly and it is rare that 
the land can be put into as good con- 
dition as it was in originally, even 
with great expense. There are few 
case's W'here the old saying that "a 
stitch in time saves nine" is more 
applicable than in the handling of land 
to prevent washing. 

PREVENTIVE MEASURES. 

A crop rotation which leaves the 
land bare as short a time as possible 
is the most fundamental preventive 



measure. Naturally corn must be 
grown on most farms but there are 
very few where corn must be grown 
over one-third of the time on the in- 
dividual fields and w-here all the stalk 
land must lie bare during the fall, 
winter, and spring. 

Winter Cover Crops. — The use of 
winter cover crops such as rye will go 
a long way in preventing the washing 
of the fall, winter and spring rains. 
The man who has never tried a crop 
like rye will be surprised at the effect 
of the fibrous roots of this crop in 
holding the soil. Other crops which 
may be used to advantage are wheat, 
barley, and — in the southern half of 

[Continued on Page 14] 

o 

SCIENTIFIC FACTS AND HORSE 
SHOEING. 



Rock Valley, Iowa, Jan. 14, 1916. 
Mr. Louis Peterson, 

Santa Ana, Cal. 
Dear Sir: — 

Your book on scientific facts, how to 
shoe speedy horses, is very interesting to 
one who has been in the granie. 

I think every man who follows the fast 
horse business would profit by readins 
your book, and following the suggestion 
outlined in same. From past experience 
in the business I know the .shoeing is 
very essential in order to get the speed 
that's in the horse. I never had a man 
who did this line of work for me that I 
had the confidence in, or got results like 
the shoeing you did. If I were going 
back in the game again I would want the 
man who did my work to read up and 
study the many good points suggested in 
your book, the title of which is Facts 
and Scientific Way of How to Shoe Fast 
Hor.ses. Yours truly, 

D. J. SCANI^AN. 

The booklet is put together in 
plain, forceful, understandable lan- 
guage. Price, $1.50. For sale by the 
author, 

LOUIS PETERSON, 

Santa Ana, Cal. 



Classified Advertising 



PERCHERON STALLION WANTED. 

Will buy, lease or trade. Must be 
blocky and registered. 

J. H. NELSON. 
Box 361, Selma, Cal. 



FOR SALE — Black McKinney stallion 
and mare — brother and sister — 7 and 8 
years old. Standard and Registered. 
Both converted to high class gaited sad- 
dle horse.s — single foot, running walk, etc. 
Lady can ride; perfectly sound. Make 
excellent cross with any highly bred 
stock. They are both ribbon winners in 
show ring. Can be seen at San Francisco 
Riding School, 701 Seventh Ave. Phone 
Pacific le.'iS. OSCAR ROMANUER. 



FOR SALE. 

BEST POLICY 42378, one of the best 
bred horses in the world. Handsome bay 
horse, small star in forehead, left hind 
pastern and left fore heel white. Has size, 
lieavy boned, stylish, pure gaited trotter, 
sr.und, and a splendid individual in every 
respect. Best Policy is by Allerton 5128, 
dam Exine 2:18V4 by Expedition, next 
dam Euxine by Axtell, next dam Russia 
by Harold 413, next dam Miss Russell, 
dam of Maud S., etc. Best Policy has 
trotted a mile on the Hanford half mile 
track in 2:12. He is ten years old and 
with little training would make a good 
game race liorse, and ninety percent of 
his colts are trotters. He will be .sold at 
a great sacrifice. For price and further 
particulars address 

BREEDER & SPORTSMAN, 
P. O. Box 447, San Francisco, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

New "Ideal McMurray" light track cart for 
niBtiiiees. workout,s. sDeediiifr and jogsing. Kirst- 
class. down to date cart, weight l.'i to f>0 pounds, 
(ireat strength and carrying power, absolute 
freedom of any hone motion. Constructed from 
the Iwft second growth white hickory, best 
guaranteed grade of pneumatic tires, handsome- 
ly linished iu rich carmine or royal blue, with 
brass screen dash, detachable, and accessoriei 
consisting of serviceable foot pump, complete 
tool and lepaii kit. wrenches, oil cun. etc.. etc. 
Weight crated 90 pounds. Itrami new and will 
be shipped to any address. For price address; 

K. W. KKI.LKV. 

HHKKHKK ami Sl'OKTS.MAN. 

HIGH-CLASS TROTTING BRED COLTS 
FOR SALE. 

No. 1. Three-year-old filly sired by All 
Style, dam Dr. Hicks. This Ally is regis- 
tered. 

No. 2. Two-year-old colt, full brother 
to the above. 

No. 3. Two-year-old filly sired by Dan 
Logan, dam a Wilkes mare who w-as a 
great n.atural pacer but unfortunately was 
crippled by a barbed wire accident as a 
yearling and was never worked. 

The All Styles are large, strong built, 
with all the style of their sire, perfect in 
action, and all three of the above colts 
should make race horses second to none. 
The Dan Logan filly is perfectly gentle to 
handle and drive and is a high-class flliy 
in every respect. Apply to or address, 
I. F. EATON, Chico, Cal. 



Saturday, January 29, 1916.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



IS 



/ 



BE/\UTIFUL BELVEDERE 



LOTS FOR SALE 



CORINTHIAN ISLAND Subdivision to Belvedere is the 
most beautiful spot on the shores of San Francisco Bay 
for a suburban home. It commands an extensive view of 
the City of San Francisco, Alcatraz and Angel Islands, 
Raccoon Straits, San Francisco Bay, Richardson's Bay, 
the Berkeley shore, beautiful Belvedere and Mt. Tamal- 
pais. It is in Marin County, directly opposite San Fran- 
cisco, and forms the eastern shore of Belvedere cove. 
It has a naturally terraced, sunny, western slope that is 
well adapted for many choice residence sites, every one 
affording most picturesque views of the bay and moun- 
tain. It is protected from the prevailing western trade winds in 
summer by Belvedere Island, and from the southerly storms in 
winter by Angel Island. The soil is fertile and part of the island 
is well wooded. 

It is less subject to fog than any other place near San 
Francisco. The summer fog, as it rolls in from the ocean, splits 
on the western slope of Sausalito, part of it flowing in a line with 
Angel Island towards the Berkeley shore, and part of it along 
the southern slope of Mt. Tamalpais, leaving Belvedere, Corin- 
thian Island and Raccoon Straits in the bright sunlight, while 
the fog banks can be seen as a white wall both to the north and 
the south. 

There is very little available land about the shores of San 
Francisco Bay that is desirable for homes, especially for those 
who love boating and kindred sports. The Alameda and Contra 
Costa shores of the bay are the lee shores and receive the full 
brunt of the boisterous trade winds which lash the shoal waters 
near the land into muddy waves, making boating both unpleas- 
ant and dangerous. To the rorth of the city and in Marin 
County the land from Sausalito to the entrance of the bay is a 
Government reservation and will never be placed on the market. 
The shores of Richardson's Bay are not at present convenient 
to boat service and, aside from Belvedere and Corinthian Island, 
there is little or no land near any ferry landing that possesses 
the natural advantages, improvements and possibilities that are 
offered on Corinthian Island. Concrete roads, pure water, tele- 
phone service and electric light wires are already installed. It is 
only ten minutes' walk from any point on the property to 
Tiburon boats, and but forty-three minutes' ride to the foot of 
Market Street. 

On the point of Corinthian Island the Corinthian Yacht 
Club has had its home for many years, and on any summer day 
the white sails of its numerous fleet add to the charming scene, 
as the trim yachts glide about the cove. Excellent fishing of all 
kinds for bay fish, including salmon, the gamey striped bass, 
rock fish and the toothsome silver smelt, is to be had in the cove. 
There is probably no spot so accessible and in such close prox- 
imity to any large city in the world that offers the attractions 
of climate, magnificent scenery, fishing and boating as will here 
be found. 



FOR MAPS, PRICES AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO 



S. L. PLANT, 

PLANT RUBBER AND SUPPLY CO., 

32 BEALE STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 



F. W. KELLEY, 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN OFFICE, 

366 PACIFIC BUILDING 

San Francisco, Cal. 



11 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 29, 1916. 



THE CONTROL OF SOIL WASHING 



[Continued from Page 12] 



the state — crimson clover. The use 
of such crops not only means a saving 
of soil but also the addition of organic 
matter or humus — a substance badly 
needed in most lands which are in- 
clined ta wash. 

Deep Plowing. — The second general 
principle of prevention is that of deep 
plowing, the object being to provide a 
deeper reservoir to hold the heavy 
rains and to cause a rapid absorption 
of the water. Fortunately, in Mis- 
souri, plowing is generally deeper than 
ill the southern states where washing 
is most destructive. There is, how- 
ever, still much room for improve- 
ment in many cases. Rolling land 
should rarely be plowed less than five 
inches deep and from seven to nine 
iriches is usually better. Land plowed 
eight inches deep can be expected to 
absorb practically twice as much wa- 
ter as that plowed four inches deep, at 
least for the first few weeks after 
plowing, and the rains which will be 
heavy and torrential enough to cause 
washing with the deeper plowing will 
be much less frequent. 

Contour Farming. — A preventive 
measure which the Missouri farmer on 
rolling land must sooner or later learn 
to apply is that of contour farming, 
that is, farming the land arounr or 
across the slope, rather than with the 
slope. Where furrows run up and down 
the slope washing is greatly increased. 
In the southern states this princle is 
almost universally practised in the 
rolling sections. Where land washes 
badly, it is more important to culti- 
vate corn across the slope only, than 
it is to check the corn and plow both 
v.-ays. The man who drills his corn 
with the slope because the field is 
somewhat longer in that direction and 
therefore increases very materially 
washing of the land is certainly not 
doing all he can to maintain soil pro- 
ductiveness. Of course, on many roll- 
ing fields, of considerable size, the 
land may slope in different directions 
in different parts of the field and un- 



der extensive systems of farming it is 
difficult to divide such fields so that 
this so-called "contour farming" may 
be practised. As agriculture becomes 
more intensive, however, more and 
more attention should be given to this 
practise. It is unlikely that the ter- 
racing of lands which is so common 
in the southern states will have a very 
important place in Missouri agricul- 
ture, but there are many farms in the 
rolling sections where such a system 
would be economical under more in- 
tensive systems of farming. 

Organic Matter in Soil. — A fourth 
general preventive measure in con- 
trolling washing is that of maintaining 
organic matter in the soil. Soils low 
in organic matter wash much more 
than those high in organic matter. 
This is due to the fact that soils high 
in organic matter absorb water more 
rapidly than those which are low in 
this material, while the presence of 
organic matter also aids in binding the 
soil particles together, thus preventing 
washing. The farmer who maintains 
organic matter by crop rotation, ma- 
nuring, and the growing of cover crops 
will suffer little from soil-washing. 
STOPPING WASHES. 

The remedies for soil washing are 
mostly included under the various 
methods of filling gullies. Many 
means are employed, different meth- 
ods being applicable under different 
conditions. Whatever method is 
adopted, however, constant care is 
necessary if the best results are to 
be secured. 

Straw for Small Gullies. — In the 
case of certain soils where small gul- 
lies persist in starting in corn fields, 
wheat fields, and even in pastures and 
meadows during the fall and winter, 
the immediate use of straw or similar 
material is necessary to stop them. In 
such cases constant attention is re- 
quired and these small gullies should 
never be allowed to reach any consid- 
erable size. This is particularly true 
in pastures or meadows, where it is 
often considered that the land is pro- 
tected by the grass and no attention 
need be given it. Gullies starting in 
drainage ways or in cattle paths on 



such fields often develop to tremen- 
dous size. 

Drag Dirt and Sow Sorghum. — In 
cultivated fields where gullies start in 
the spring or early summer, a very 
good plan is to drag in some dirt and 
sow sorghum. If the sorghum gets 
started before a heavy rain comes it 
will hold the soil and make it possible 
to harrow and cultivate across these 
gullies during the season, thus drag- 
ging in dirt which will entirely fill 
them. Gullies a foot deep and two or 
three feet wide may be quite effective- 
ly filled in this way. 

Fill, Plow, Harrow, Seed. — Gullies a 
foot or two in depth and from two to 
four feet wide can well be stopped 
with straw or debris, and dirt plowed 
on top of this during the late winter 
or spring months so as to fill them as 
nearly as possible. They should then 
be harrowed over and top dressed with 
manure containing timothy hay or 
barn floor sweepings, or if these are 
not available sow timothy seed with 
the manure. Some alfalfa, bluegrass, 
and red top seed may often be added 
with the timothy to advantage. Where 
straw or debris is not available such 
gullies may be merely plowed in, har- 
rowed, manured, and seeded to grass, 
as mentioned above, with good results. 
Sorghum may also be seeded on this 
filled-in soil to hold the land during 
the summer and fall and the grass 
seeded the following spring. 

Brush, Logs, Stumps for Large Gul- 
lies. — Gullies which are too large to 
plow in easily, offer a very serious and 
expensive problem in filling. Brush, 
logs and stumps may be used in filling 
them and where properly handled 
these prove very effective. Stones are 
also sometimes used but they are of 
little value. Brush should always be 
piled with the tops up stream. In 
the case of fine brush, particularly, it 
is best to stake it down at intervals. 
Where available, osage orange and 
cedar furnish the best of brush to use. 
If brush is mixed with straw it is usu- 
ally more satisfactory than where 
used alone and the more compact it 
can be made the better. Loose brush 
is of little value. 



Brush Dam. — The use of various 
sorts of dams in the stopping of gul- 
lies is becoming common. For small 
gullies a row of stakes driven across 
and straw piled above answers in 
some cases, but these must be contin- 
ually watched. For larger gullies a 
dfim of brush gives fair results when 
properly built. It is best to build it 
of green brush with leaves on it, if 
cedar is not available, laying the long- 
er pieces on the bottom with the tops 
up stream, then piling the shorter 
pieces on top. For best results the 
brush should be mixed with straw and 
staked down. It should be tightly 
packed and left lowest in the middle 
to prevent cutting around the edges. 

Concrete Dams. — Reinforced con- 
crete dams are quite satisfactory for 
particular locations, especially for 
those large gullies which are deep and 
narrow. Such dams should be from 
six to twelve inches thick, depending 
on the size and depth of the gully. 
The proper reinforcing of such a dam 
is very important, iron rods of good 
weight being essential in the larger 
dams and heavy wires in the smaller 
ones. The middle should be left lower 
than the edges and a spillway provid- 
ed with a concrete, stone, or brick 
apron placed in the bottom of the gul- 
ly to prevent cutting by the falling 
water. The ends of a concrete dam 
should extend well back into the ditch 
banks on either side to prevent the 
water cutting around. Any such dam 
will gradually allow the gully above to 
fill with sediment. 

Dickey System. — The use of earth 
dams for filling large gullies is very 
common in some parts of the state. 
A system known as the Dickey sys- 
tfm has recently come into some 
prominence. It consists of a dam, usu- 
ally of earth, at the bottom of which 
is placed a large sewer tile with the 
upper end turned upward by means 
of an elbow toint. The water must 
rise behind the dam to the height of 
the upturned tile before it can pass on. 
The sediment is largely deposited in 
this standing water. Extra joints are 
tlien placed on the upturned tile as 
the dirt accumulates until the gully is 



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Horsemen, Stock Breeders, Manufacturers of Sulkies, Car- 
riages, Wagons, Agricultural and Dairying Implements 
and Machinery, Sporting Goods, Fanciers, Stock Foods, 
and all others desiring to bring their wares to the atten- 
tion of the classes to whose Interests the paper Is devoted 
within the field mentioned above, the BREEDER AND 
SPORTSMAN will be found Indispensable. 



Harpers Weekly 

Six Months, 26 Copies, Regular Price $2.50 

At no time has It been so evident to Americans as now, 
that the most Important thing In the lives of all of us Is 
the progress of the European War. 

Next to your dally bread the war Interests you most 
vitally. It may even come to be the most Important part 
of your problem of living. 

The periodical of greatest fundamental Interest to you 
today is the one that can best report those phases of the 
war that come closest to your country and you. 

Because of connections abroad and at home, HARPER'S 
WEEKLY Is thai publication. 

As a critical commentary that presents Inside facts. It 
Is the necessary bridge for Intelligent readers between 
the dally newspaper and the monthly review. 

You want HARPER'S WEEKLY now. You can get It 
now on trial at a remarkable reduction. 



Send $3.25 Now and Get Them Both 

THIS OFFER is made to all who will send us $3.25 before January 31st, 1916, whether for extension of 
subscription, renewal of subscription or a new subscription. Address: 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



P. O. Drawer 447 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Saturday, January 29, 1916.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



16 



entirely filled. In order to remove the 
standing water above the dam a tile 
is often laid in a shallow ditch made 
in the bottom of the gully for a short 
distance, covered well to prevent 
washing out, and this is then either 
run into the sewer pipe or through the 
dam. 

Sewer of Good Size. — The most im- 
portant point in handling this system 
of filling gullies is to have the sewer 
large enough to carry the water of the 
heaviest rains, thus preventing an 
overflow which will cut out the dam. 
Of course the large reservoir for water 
above the dam allows considerable 
storage, until the gully is nearly filled, 
which decreases the danger of the dam 
overflowing. Such a sysetem is espe- 
cially applicable to wide and rather 
shallow gullies such as commonly oc- 
cur near the lower side of a slope but 
it may be used on any large gully. Of 
course where the slope is steep and 
the gully long, a number of such dams 
must be installed. 

Fill Hillside Gully With Debris.— 
For large hillside gullies it is usually 
much better to fill with debris of vari- 
ous kinds and plow or scrape in. Re- 
peated backfurrowing over the gully 
will gradually fill it. After it is filled, 
cover heavily with manure and work 
throughly into the surface, seeding 
down to grass with rye, oats, or other 
quick-growing ceceal which will help 
to hold the soil until the grass gets 
started. Such filling of large gullies 
is expensive, but it can be done if 
proper efforts are put forth. Land so 
gullied is practically worthless and one 
can afford to put a large amount of 
work into filling them. 

Plant Willow or Bushes. — The plant- 
ing of willows or bushes along the 
edge of a gully is often done for the 
purpose of stopping further erosion. 
AA'here they get o good hold and a 
good growth in the ditch sides and 
bottom, they aid greatly in filling it. 
This planting is best done in late win- 
ter or early spring and those washing 
out should be replaced until a perma- 
nent stand is secured. — M. F. Miller, 
University of Missouri. 



THE FERTILIZER SITUATION IN 
THE UNITED STATES. 

[Concluded from last week.] 



Another source of nitrogen is found 
in garbage. The investigations of the 
Bureau of Soils indicate that if the 
garbage of all cities having a popula- 
tion of 30,000 and over were convert- 
ed into garbage tankage, the product 
would be worth for fertilizer purposes 
at least $3,500,000. In view of the 
present situation, immediate steps 
should be taken by all municipalities 
to conserve the garbage and to make 
it available for use in the fertilizer 
trade. 

The Bureau of Soils is studying also 
the problem of the fixation of atmos- 
pheric nitrogen with a view to develop 
a method for the production of ammo- 
nium phosphate and other forms of 
concentrated fertilizers. No ammo- 
nium phosphate is being made in this 
country at the present time. If cheap 
water power, phosphate rock, coal, 
and limestone can be found in acces- 
sible localities, the possibility of mak- 
ing this material on a commercial 
scale is considered entirely feasible. 
The greatest difficulty here is to dis- 
cover cheap water power at points 
where phosphate rock, coal, and lime- 
stones are really available. The De- 
partment is making every effort to 
locate available sources of developed 
water power which can be used in the 
manufacture of ammonium phosphate 
and other fertilizers. 

It must not be understood that the 
suggestions which have been made, or 
the efforts which are now being put 
forth, will result in immediate relief 
for farmers. There are a number of 
technical problems which have to be 
solved if these fertilizers are to be 
produced on a commercial scale, and, 
even if the funds for the necessary 
plants were provided, either from pri- 
vate or public sources, considerable 
time necessarily would be required for 
the erection of the plants and for their 
full operation. 




Watch Your Colts 

For Coughs, Colds and Distemper, and at the first symp- 
toms of any such ailment, give small doses of that won- 
derful remedy, now the most used in existence. 

SPOHN'S DISTEMPER COMPOUND, 

50 cents and $1 a bottle; $5 and $10 the dozen, of any 
druggist, harness dealer, or delivered by 

SPOHN MEDICAL CO., 

Chemists, Goshen, Ind. 



Makes Them Sound SMITH'S WONDER WORKER Keeps Them Sound 

Allays fever and iDfiatnmatlon at once, this must he done to effect a cure. 
UNEXCELLED AS A REMEDY for bone and \K>g spavins, curbs, splints, rinzbones, 
capped hocks, shoe bolls, wind puffs, thoroughplng and bunches of all kinds, bowed, 
strained and ruptured tendons, shoulder, nip and stifle lameness, weak Joints, 
sweeny, cordlns up. throat trouble and rheumatism. Relieves pains and soreness 
without loss of hair or a day's let up. As a leg and body wash It has no equal, In- 
vigorates and restores the distressed horse between heats and after hard workouts. 
Pric* $2. 00 p*r bolth, prtpaid on rteeipt of prie: S16. 00 par do*. ; $tO. 00 par ami. 

E. DETEL8, Pleasanton Cal., Dlt^-lbutlna Agent, for the Paclflc Coa.«i. 

W. K. SMITH & CO., Tiffin, Ohio. 




W. 



Frank Davey, 

Cutter 



S. W. Dixon 

Exclusive Tailors 
to Men 

=IMPORTERS OF 

HIGH -CLASS WOOLENS 

BANKERS INVESTMENT BUILDING 
Rooms 405 and WT 

Jk2 Market St Oeary St. 

HEALD'8 
BUSINESS COLLEGE 

tralna for Bualnaaa and placaa Ita grad- 

uataa In poaltlena. 
1216 Van Naaa Avanua. tan Franolaoa 

BLAKE MOFFIT 6 TOWNE 



GUNCRAFT 



Ity W. A IlruBlto 



DEALERS 
IN 



PAPER 



t7-1at St., San Franelaeo. Cal. 
Blaka, IfcFall St Co.. Portland, Or*. 
Blaka, MoflHt and Town*, I^oa JUacalaa 



A modern 
treatise on gunt, 
^ 4V E"" fitting, am- 

munition, wing 

' ^ ' and trap tboot' 
ing. 

The theoretical side 
of the subject has been 
covered with a scientific 
accuracy which makes it 
an up-to-date book of ref- 
erence, and the practical 
side of wing shooting, gun 
fitting, the master eye, de- 
fects in vision and other 
important questions have 
been treated in a way that 
will enable cither (he ex- 
pert or the amateur to de- 
termine if he is shooting with a gun that fits him and 
how to decide upon one that does. It will enable 
him to ascertain why he misses some shots and is 
successful with others. The secrets of success in trap 
shooting, as well as the peculiarities in flight of the 
quail, the jacksnipc, the woodcock, the ruffed grouse, 
and the duck family, arc illustrated by drawings and 
described in a way that will facilitate the amateur in 
mastering the art of wing shooting. 

Cartridge board cover, 11.00; Goth, $1.50 

BREEDER A. SPORTSMAN, 
Post Office Drawer 447, San Francisco 




Five Thousand 
Gun Clubs Welcome You 



IIKARTV haiulsiike, a spirit of goodft'llowsliip 
and a sport that will give you a new lease of 
life is offered you by 5000 gun clubs through- 
out the country. 



TRAPSHOOTING 



is at its best and there's a club 
riKht in your own town where 
you can shoot to your heart's 
content Look it up. Get in the 
game — the game that makes 
better citizens. 

WRITE FOR SPORT ALLURING 
BOOKLET 



E. I. du Pont 
de Nemours 
& Company 

Wilmington. Del. 

BRANCHES: 

KAN FRANCISCO: 
Ninth Floor Chronicle Bldn. 
DENVER: 

Central Savings Bank Bldfr. 
SEATTLE: 

Maynard Building 




Third Edition Within One Year of Pub- 

Ikntlon. 

CARE AND TRAINING OF 
TROHERS AND PACERS 

NEVER before In the history of the 
imbllshlng world has a horse book 
Bone Into a third edition within one 
year of publication. Yet the explanation 
Is simple — tlie book (Ills a long-felt want. 

Never before has this subject been 
treated In a distinct manner. It has been 
hinulled In connection with autobiographies 
of trainers, but such works are out of 
I)i;lnt or out of date, for they were pub- 
lished 20 years or more ago. Conditions 
aiKl methods have changed since then, 
and former treatises are Just as much 
out of date as the high-whecl sulklea 
then In vogue. 

"Care and Training of Trotters and 
Pacers" Is as nio<Iern as a 42-centImeter 
gun. It docs not contain the Ideas of 
one man, but of 100 of the lending horse- 
nun of the day, Including Thomas \V. 
Murphy. Walter R. Cox, and Edward F. 
(iicrs. Those Ideas were converted Into 
book form by two prominent American 
turf Journalists. 

This book enables anyone to do his own 
caretaking and training until It Is time 
to send the colt to a professional trainer, 
or the owner can train and race the colt 
himself. The treatise covers the details 
of a colt's life from the moment It la 
fiiiiUd until after Its first year's cam- 
piilgn. The facts are clearly presented. 
Nothing Is left to guess \v»trk. The Ian- 
gunge Is lucid. Hoth theoretical and 
liinctlcal views are outlined and com- 
piircd. The Instructions are concise and 
rn^tly uiulcrstood. The work contains no 
fi'h ' I f l^^rnM iits — It Is not a catch-penny 
piiMlriillon that looks big In the adver- 
tK.iiwiit hut proves disappointing when 
ri r l ived. 

Many professional trainers have pur- 
il.nsed the book and have found It In- 
tircHtlng. Despite the war. over 300 
rnpicH have been sold In Europe and Aus- 
trulln. 

Price 11.00 postpaid. Cloth, 

■ illuitratcd, 176 pagci, &x7 Inchci, ZZIZI 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

366 P.iciric BIdg., San Franclico, Cal 
or Post Office Drawer 447 

ALL CUTS 
IN THIS PUBLICATION MADE BY 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PHOTO -ENGRAVING CO. 

215 LEIDESDORFP ST., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Sutter 5398 



SELDOM SEE 

a big knee like this, but your horse 

may have a bunch or bruise on his 
Ankle, Hock, Stirte, Knee or Throat. 



ABSORBINE 

TRADE MARK MG.ttS.PAT. OFf. 



will clean it off without laying the 
horse up. No blister, no hoir 
gone. Concentrated — only a few 
drops required at an application. $2 per 

twttle <icll»tr«i. DeKfibe your ci« tor lp«l>l Inilruclloni 
tnd Book 8 K free. ABSORBINE. JR.. iniiKptlc 
liniment lor minkind. Reduce! Pilnlul Swellinjt, En- 
Urged Clandi. Goitre. Wem. Brui»e». Viriroie Veinfc 
Viricoiitlcs. Old Soret. All«y» Piin. Price tl ind tZ • 
boitle It drueeim or delivered. Minuficiured only by 

W. F. V0UN6, P. 0. F., &4 Temple St, Springfield, Miut 

For Ml* by Langley A MlchMU, Bar FrAnciao6, Calir,; 
WoodwAjd, Clark A Co , PortUnd Or« , Cal Dmfl A Chsn. 
Co , Brniuwlg Prua Co , WMUrn WhoUtalc Drag Co., Lot 
AjusIw, Calh Kirk, C\wf A Co.. SAcranxnto, Calif; 

rug. Co.. BvAitt*. Waah.; Bpokan* Drug Co.. 8pe 



HOUSEHOLD SUPPLIES:- 

"Smith's Pay lha Fralght" to reiluce tlio 
IiIkIi (Out (il living, senil (or our WIioI)>sb1o to 
CoiLsuroor CktaloRiie. .Smith's ('bdIi .store. 110-11 
( lay .Street. .Snn Francisco. 

Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalzlel 

E>ery facility to give the beat of pio- 
feaalonal aervlcea to all caaea of vetnrlu- 
ary dentlatry. Complicated caaea treated 
aucceaar\illy. Calla from out of town 
promptly reaponded to. 

Tha beat work at reaaonabl* pricaa 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL 
ftSO Fulton at. 

San Pranclaco, Cal. 

Wm .F. EGAN. V.M.R.C.S. 

Vetarlnary Surgeon. 
11BB Qoldan Oats Ave. 
Branch HoapltAl, cornar Wabatar and 
Chaatnut Btraata. 
•an Franelaoo, Cal. 



THE OFFICIAL HIGH AMATEUR AVERAGE 




FOR THE YEAR 1915 

WAS WON BY MR. WOOLFOLK HENDERSON, OF LEXINGTON, KY., USING 



Woolfolk Henderson 



SHELLS 

He Shot at 2800 Registered Targets, Broke 2731; Percentage .9753 

THE HIGHEST YEARLY AMATEUR AVERAGE ON RECORD. 



The wonderful record of Mr. Henderson in 1914, when he won the Four great amateur honors, is still fresh in the minds of the shooting frater- 
nity. In that year he captured the Grand American Handicap, the Single Target and Double Target Championships of the United States and the 
High Amateur Average. His performance in 1915 is therefore but the continuation of a marvelous and thoroughly consistent record, made 
possible by ammunition of superlative quality. 

PETERS SHELLS have been used by the winner of the United States Hight Amateur Average (official) FIVE OUT OF THE PAST SIX YEARS 

THE PETERS CARTRIDGE CO., PaclHc Coast Branch. 585-S87 Howard Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



C. G. Spencer 



The Big Winner In 1915 

The Interstate Association's Official High Professional Average for the season of 1915 was won by 
Charles G. Spencer, of St. Louis, Mo., with the marvelous record of 91.5% for 5620 targets. Such an 
average for such a large number of targets not only shows Mr. Spencer's great skill, but also proves the 
uniform and unequalled quality of 

LOADED SHELLS AND SHOTGUNS 

which Mr. Spencer used exclusively. It was this same combination that he used when he made his mar- 
velous straight run of 565 targets — the World's Record. 

("<)titest.s for the Season's Trai).shooting Averages have been held 16 times and 12 of tiieni have been won by 
shells or guns, or both, which is undeniable evidence of tlieir superiority. 

Lester German, of Aberdeen. Md., who was second high for the season, and who also made the greatest score of 
the year for a single tournament — 499 x 500 — used AVinchester shells in performing this great feat. 

J. Mownell Hawkins, of Baltimore, Md., shot 7,265 targets in competition during 1915, and made the splendid 
average of 95.56%, using Winchester shells and shotguns t-xclusivoly — more proof of their uniform shooting quali- 
ties. These performances show the reason why Winchester shells and guns are 

PREFERRED AND USED BY MEN OF ACHIEVEMENT 




Pistol and Revolver Cartridges 
That Are Dependable and Accurate 

^^0\] selected your pistol or revolver because you expected it to give you results. 

Now, results — whether iu casual shooting — or in serious work at the target — depend 
more than you might think on the wise choice of ammunition. 

It is worth remembering that the biggest men among Pistol and Revolver Champions 
shoot Remlng ton rUMC cartridges — made for every standard make of pistol and revolver 
used anywhere in the world. 

For the right ammunition from the sportsmen's point of view, see the Remington-UIMC 
Dealer. He displays the /?ed Ba// Marfc of Remington-UMC. 

Write for two free booklets — "Straight to the Mark," about George Armstrong 
and other record holders, and "All About Metallic Cartridges." 

REMINGTON ARMS-UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 
Woolworth Building New York City 






EMINGTON 



Paramount Parker Guns 



Look. 



Read. 



ilr. AViKiIfolk Hender.son. an amateur, by scoring .9753';^ m.idf tliu 

HIGHEST OFFICIAL GENERAL AVERAGE FOR 1915 

Mr. Lester German, a profes.sional. by scoring .9742% m.Tfle 

SECOND OFFICIAL GENERAL AVERAGE FOR SAME PERIOD 
CLEAN SWEEP ON DOUBLE TARGETS 
Me.'isrs. Guy V. DerinK, .s. A. Huntley and Woolfulk Henderson won 

FIRST, SECOND and THIRD, 
respectively, by scoring *Jnii(l%. 8GGG% and S400%. 

THE WORLD'S RECORD!!! 

At Atlantic City Sept. 15 to 17 Mr. Le.ster German broke all Tournament 
Fecords by .scoring 647 OUT OF 650 TARGETS, with one run of 372 
straight, which is longest for the year. 

"tRKER GUNS have won the Grand American Handicap 9 times out of 
za offers, once with 100 straight, only time made. Also 7 out of 9 Inter- 
state Championship Kvent.s with highest scores ever made, twice with 
198 X 200 at 18 yards rise. 

PARKER PACIFIC COAST RECORDS 

In California Mr. Henry Pfirrmann won the Pacific Coast Handicap and 
Mr. J. Foster Couts won the Championship of California. 
In Portland, Oregon. Mr. P. H. O'Brien by scoring 241 straight made the 
record for the Pacific Coast. 
If interested in small bore guns write for instructive booklet which will be sent free 
on request. For further particulars regarding guns from 8 to 28 gauge, address 
PARKER BROS., Merlden, Conn. New York Salesroom, 32 W^trren Street; 

or A. W. duBray, Residing Agent, San Francisco, P. O, Box 102 



Remember 



TRAINING THE HOUND 



A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON THE TRAINING OF FOX HOUNDS, BEAGLES, 

AND COON HOUNDS. 

The system of training advocated is simple and effective, so that anyone who car- 
ries out instructions can easily develop a foxhound, a beagle or a coon dog to the 
highest state of usefulness or organize a pack in which each hound will work independ- 
ently and at the s-ime time harmoniously with the others. The subjects are: The 
Hound's Ancestry, History, Instinctive Tendencies, English and Native Hounds, Devel- 
oping the Intellisence, Training the Foxhound, Voices and Pace of the Hound, Quali- 
ties of Scent. Manners, Training the Coon Dog, Coon Hunting, Training the Beagle, 
Forming a Pack, Field Trial Handling, Faults and Vices, Conditioning, Selecting and 
Rearing Puppies. Kennels and Yards. Diseases of Hounds and Their Treatment. The 
chapters on field trial training and handling are alone worth the price of the book, 
which is one that every man who loves the voice of a hound should read. 

The book contains 224 pages, is clearly printed, nicely bound, and handsomely illus- 
trated with bloodhounds, various types of English and American foxhounds, beagles 
and cross-bred dogs for 'possum and coon hunting. 

Price, In heavy paper cover, $1; $1.50, postpaid. 

ADDRESS: 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

p. O. DRAWER 447, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




VOLUME LXVIII. No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1916. 



Subscription — $3.00 Per Year 




2 



THTb UREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 5, 1916. 



Pleasanton Driving Park 

PLEASANTON. CALIFORNIA 

offers for service for the season of 1916 the following stallions: 

THE ANVIL 2:02 3-4 

Fastest trotting stallion ever offered for service in California, and 
fourth fastest entire trotter in the world 

.Son of St. Valiant Vinctnt 2:11% (by St. Vincent 2:U\i out of the triple 
protluoer Grace Lee 2:2yVi by Electioneer 125); dam Amy Smith by Kniperor 
Wilke.s 2.20%, sire of Princess Kulalia (4) 2:091,4, etc.; grandam by Hamble- 
tonian 5;i9. 

The Anvil is regarded by Edward F. Geers as one of the very greatest trot- 
ters tnat he has ever raced. For five years the pair of Tennesseeans went to 
the races together and in that time were but twice unplaced, while winning a 
total of fifteen races, including the historic M. and M. 

As an inaividual he is mo.>:t pleasing, not too large or coarse in any way but 
smoothly and compactly made and "all horse" in every line. He is a perfect 
headed, pure gaited trotter, with the very best of disposition, and is destined 
to become a very great sire of trotting speed. His opportunities in the stud 
have been very sliglit as he has been retired from racing cmly since the close 
of 1914. and lias but three or four foals now three years old. He was selected 
to he.".d the stud at Pleasanton Driving Park not only on account of his great 
qualities as a race trotter, but becau.se one of his first foals, Anvilite (2) 2:22%. 
with a trial of ten seconds or more faster, is in every way the greatest colt 
trotter ever handled by C. L. DeKyder. The services of The Anvil are recom- 
mended to you without reserve. 

Fee for The Anvil 2:02^4, $100 with usual privilege 

Vernon McKinney 2:01 1-2 

Fastest member of the great family of McKinney 2:llJ4 
Sire of VERNA McKINNEY (2) 2:13 (his first foal raced), 
fastest two-year-old pacing filly of 1915. 

Son of Guy McKinney 3762.') (by McKinney 2:11 V4 out of Flossie Drais by Guy 
Wilkes 2:15',4); dam Maud Vernon by Mount Vernon 2:15%, sire of the dams of 
Le.ita J. 2:0:i, etc.; grandam Mag by General McClellan, sire of the dams of 
Mack Mack 2:0S, etc. 

Vornon McKinney's racing career was not an extensive one but will long bo 
remembered for the excellence of his performances, as his winnings include a 
Chamber of Commerce stake in time very near the record for that event at the 
time, and lie is the fastest of all the McKinneys. 

He is a horse of rare (lualities in the way of individual excellence, almost 
ideal in behavior and temperament in harness or out. Since his retirement he 
has been a popular horse in the stud and our cl.'iim that he would prove a very 
groat sire of pacing speed ha.s been fully substantiated, his first foal to be raced 
being the season chami)ion for the age and gait in 1915. a most excellent testi- 
monial to his potency. He is a very sure breeder, his get are uniformly endowed 
with natural speed and the physical and mental requirements of modern race 
iKir.ses ;ind find reaily sale at most gratifying prices. 

Fee for Vernon McKinney 2:0154. $50 with usual privilege 

The best of care t.'vken of mares in any manner owners may desire, but no 
responsibility assumed for accidents or escapes. Address for particulars 



CHAS. L. DeRYDER, Superintendent, 



PLEASANTON, CAL. 



DOUBT AND FEAR NEVER EARNED 




or cured anj-thinK— and delay is costly. The Horse Can- 
not Cure Itself! MoueV Must be Spent! The 
Problem is, to— sl*KM> WISKI-Y. 

Here are the reasons why you should not fail to send 
for our FREE Save-The-Horse BOOK, 

Chas. L. Lains* Hedjjeville, W. Va., writes: "We had a Korse 
four years ago with spavin. We lost his use for a year. 1 bought 
one bottle of Save-The-Horse and cured him sound. 
**lt's the Most Powerful Medicine I ever used," writes W. J, 

Slonesefer. Route I, Kcymar. Md. 

**Savc-The-Horse Cured Worst Thoroughpins I ever saw." Thos. 
Payne. Bowling Green, Ky., also writes, "and she has been all 
right for more than a year." 

* After Using Save-The-Horse For Two Weeks on a Bone Spavin 

He Does Not Go Lame. It is a great remedy." writes Albert 
StoU, 915 South 4th Ave, Ann Arbor. Mich. 

"Cured by One Bottle of Save-The-Horse.*' E. C. Walte, West 
Lebanon, N. H , also says, "the hoof is grown out and the fistulous 
condition completely healed," etc. 

"The Corns Are Gone and The Contracted Hoofs and Tendons 
Are Aii Cured," writes F. S. Reynolds. Fairplain, W. Va. 
Henry F. C. Smith, Route 8, Fremont, Ohio, writes: *'i am pleased 
to tcU you that 1 bought Savc-The-Horse for Sweeney and it did the 
work right and perfect. ^He worked every day. Refer anyone to 
me who wants to know." 

Regardless of price or any other reason, Save-The-Horse is the 
cheapest remedy known. It goes through and through both 
bone and tissue — it works inside, not outside —and produces a 
cure that withstands every test. No blistering, scar or loss of 
hair. Horse can work as usual — winter or summer, 
case and we will send our — 96-page illustrated Book — 
All Free (to Horse Owners and Managers). 



96 PAGE 

BOOK 
FREE 

Every bottle sold v Ith Sliciu-a Con- 
truft to rt'lurn luont-y If n inuOy lulls 
on Ulii'^bone — Tlioropln— Wpuvln — or 
Any Shoulder, Knee, Ankle, iloof or 
Tendon l>lbease. 

But write, describing your 
Sample Contract and Advice— 

TROY CHEMICAL CO., Commerce Ave., Binghamton, N. Y. 

Druggists Everywhere sell Save-The-Horse with Contract, or sent by Parcel Post Prepaid. 

D. E. NEWELL, Agent, 80 Bayo Vista Ave., OAKLAND, CAL. 



Catarrhal Fever 

S to 6 doses often cure. 

One 50 cent bottle SPOHN'S guaranteed to cure a case. 
Safe for any mare, horse or colt. 

Dozen bottles S."). Get it of druggists, harness dealers, 
or direct from manufacturers, express paid. 

SPOHN'S is the best preventive of all Jorms of dis- 
temper. 

SPOHN MEDICAL CO,, 

Chemists, Goshen, Ind. 



Makes Them Sound SMITH'S WONDER WORKER Keeps Them Sound 

Allays fever and iDflatnmatlon at once, this must be done to effect a cure. 
UNEXCELLED AS A REMEDY for Ixine and bog spavins, curbs, splints, ringbones, 
capped bocks, sboe bolls, wind puffs, thoroughpins and bunches of all kinds, bowed, 
strained and ruptured tendons, shoulder, nip and stitle lameness, weak Joints, 
bweeny, cordinc up, throat trouble and rheumatism. Relieves pains and soreness 
without loss of hair or a day's let up. As a leg and body wash It has no equal. In- 
vigorates and restores the distressed horse between beats and after bard workouts. 
Price $2.00 per bottle, prepaid on receipt of price, f 16.00 per dox.; $10.00 per gmU 

DETEL8, Pleasanton Cal.. Dlt^-lbutlng Agent, for the Pacific Coaal. 

W. K. SMITH A CO., Tiffin, Ohio. 





Pedigrees Tabulated 

Typewritten, Suitable For Framing = 

Registration Standard-Bred Horses Attended to 

Stallion Service Books, $1.00 
Stallion Folders 

with picture of the horse and terms on first page ; complete tabulated pedigree 
on the two inside pages and description on baclc page 

Stallion Cards for Posting 

size, one-half sheet, 14x22; size one-third sheet, 11x14 

Stallion Cards 

two sides, size x 6>^, to fit envelop 
A D D RESS 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



366 PACIFIC BLDC. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Saturday, February 5, 1916] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
Turf and Sporting Authority on the Pacific Coast. 

(Established 1SS2.) 
Published every Saturday. 
F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACFIC BUILDING 
Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
National Newspaper Bureau, Agent, 219 East 23rd St., 

New York City. 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco P. O. 



Terms — One year, $3; six months, $1.75; three months, $1. 

Foreign postage $1 per year additional; Canadian postage 
50c per year additional. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or regis- 
tered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 
447, San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



STALLIONS ADVERTISED 



ANVIL, 2:n2?i C. L. DcRyder. Pleasanton 

VERNON McKINNEY 2:01% . .C. L. DeRyder, Pleasanton 



THAT FAIR ASSOCIATION. 



During the fall meeting at the Panama-Pacific Ex- 
position a number of persons directly interested in 
the future of the district fair on this coast met in 
this city and formed a new organization known as the 
Pacific Coast Fair Association. Attendance at the 
two meetings was good, enthusiasm ran high, and 
the ball was started rolling in very good shape. From 
lack of action of any description on the part of the 
association or its officers, however, "the ball" would 
seem to be of the snow ball variety, as it has evi- 
dently melted or hit a post and gone to pieces. Our 
assumption in the matter may be entirely erroneous 
and we will be pleased to have it so proven, as there 
is a great need for concerted action on the part of 
trotting horse breeders and campaigners in behalf 
of the welfare of their industry. There are very 
many applicable axioms which could be quoted in the 
present instance such as "the Lord helps those who 
help themselves," etc., and if horsemen expect the 
sport of trotting to be popularized and perpetuated 
on this coast they themselves must take the initia- 
tive in the matter. 

There was a need for the organization that was 
effected, and a most excellent field for its activities, 
as by a little real hard work done in their behalf the 
situation of the small fairs in California w-ould be 
very greatly improved. The new body and its aims 
were given a good deal of favorable publicity by the 
daily papers and numbers of the country publications 
at the time its organization was effected, and the 
proposal to boost California fairs, with horse racing, 
was well received in many quarters. Certain locali- 
ties expressed their intention of giving a fair and 
solicited the co-operation of the new concern, while 
breeders of the saddle horse and the thoroughbred 
signified not merely their willingness but their eager- 
ness to join hands with the trotting horse breeders 
in an effort to set the fairs upon an enduring and 
profitable basis. 

Business affairs engaged in prior to his selection as 
secretary caused the absence of Secretary Smith 
from California for some weeks, an absence prolonged 
through the sad and regrettable death of a member 
of his family, but he was expected to begin opera- 
tions immediately upon his return to the state, which 
was effected some weeks ago. Mr. Smith is helpless 
without adequate funds, and at this writing we 
have had no word of any steps having been taken 
in any way by the association, and very respectfully 
suggest to all its members and prospective members 
that prompt action must be taken if the body is to 
accomplish anything of a beneficial nature this sea- 
son — and this season is the proper one for making 
their start. The subscription and membership cam- 
paign must be renewed with vigor, and the canvass 
of the state that will enable horsemen to know 
exactly what fairs will be held, and when, must be 
made without further delay. There are a number of 
local associations that will give events of more or 
less pretensions, but these should be welded into a 
harmonious circuit, with consecutive dates, uniform 
conditions and an itinerary for economical shipping, 
for there are a good many miles between points in 
California and the purses will not be large enough to 
justify campaigners in covering the same route more 
than once. 



W e especially urge that .subscriptions to the funds 
of the organization be made good, and .^imgost that 
the matter of subscriptions be taken up with present 
and prospective meinbcrs on a new basis. The fig- 
ures aimed at before wore entirely too high, and, in 
our estimation, in exces^.s of the amount required for 
the accomplishment of a great deal of good. It is not 
necessary that enough be raised to finance a number 
of meetings, for in the first place there are not the 
idle plants available for the giving of many Independ- 
ent affairs, or new events. The fairs that will be 
given will be sponsored by the old local associations 
in almost every instance, though perhaps a few new 
ones might be provided for were the horsemen to 
back them largely. These are practically negligible 
quantities, and the manner in which the greatest good 
may be accomi)lishod lies through a close co-opera- 
tion between the horsemen's organization and those 
already in existence at various points throughout the 
state. 

The volumns of this paper are open to the discus- 
sion of all questions relating to this matter and we 
will be glad to hear the views of any of our readers 
concerning the same. 

o 

THE REVIEW RACING GUIDE. 



Volume Four of the Horse Review Racing Guide 
arrived on the Pacific coast last week and has been 
eagerly welcomed by those who had subscribed for 
the same earlier in the season. The appearance of 
this number of the series was slightly delayed owing 
to sickness late last year in the ranks of the Review 
staff, but the matter contained within its covers is 
of the kind that will merely increase in value with 
the passing of time and the inconvenience of getting 
along without it for a few weeks has merely added 
warmth to the welcome it received when it did arrive. 

The Guide, while not an official publication of 
either of the parent associations which govern the 
affairs of the trotting turf in America, is in certain 
respects far superior to any of the other statistical 
works of a similar nature insofar as filling the re- 
quirements of the casual delver into trotting lore. 
In reality the use of the words "of a similar nature" 
is largely in error, as there are no books like it save 
in a few respects. While of necessity failing to 
include within its covers a certain portion of the 
detailed information presented in the official works, 
it goes a great deal farther in other very interesting 
and important respects and presents a vast fund of 
authentic matter, condensed and easily accessible, 
that is not to be gleaned from the official statistics 
save by long research on the part of one highly con- 
versant with the use of the Year Book and possessed 
of a complete issue of the same. 

The popularity of the Guide since its inception has 
made the trotting horse public very familiar with its 
general makeup, and Volume Four possesses all the 
important features of its predecessors, to which new 
and welcome additions have been made. The statis- 
tical tables of an unusual nature that have proven 
so useful and popular previously have been enlarged 
and brought down to date, while the added matter is 
of a nature that greatly enhances the scope and value 
of the publication. Only by a thorough inspection 
can all its good points be realized, and we take 
pleasure in recommending it to the library or office 
of every horseman. 

• o 

HANFORD IN LINE FOR 1916. 



The directors of the Kings County Fair Association 
held a meeting at Hanford last Saturday and after 
a thorough discussion and review of conditions as 
they exist today in California, it was decided to hold 
the customary county fair along the same lines that 
made it popular and successful in the years prior to 
1915. For sixteen years in a row the "Little Kingdom 
of Kings" had put on one of the very best small fairs 
in the west until the exposition came along and broke 
into the series, and now the work will be taken up 
where it was left off and the fair will be made bigger 
and better in every way. 

Kings county, in the heart of a ready money sec- 
tion where prosperity is assured through a highly 
advanced and successful system of agriculture in 
which the adequate production of livestock plays a 
very important part, has every natural advantage for 
the upbuilding of a really great agricultural fair. It 
owns its own fair grounds, which are fairly well 
Improved, and the country surrounding It Is well 
settled and provided with good roads. The grounds 



are well provided with shade trees that make the 
old-fashioned system of going to the fair for the day 
and eating a picnic dinner on the grass an enjoyable 
one, and while most of the buildings have weathered 
the storms of several years (hey are in good repair 
and of a capacity adequate to the demands which 
have been imposed upon them in previous years. The 
track is of the two-lap variety but is a safe one to 
race over, and the association plans not only to 
improve their buildings considerably but also to 
increase their track to the regulation mile dimen- 
sions. A condemnation suit now pending will be 
settled in ample time for the construction of the 
mile course for use at this year's fair, if the decision 
is favorable to the county, but whether or not the 
new track is built, the directors promise the best 
fair in the history of the association. 

Dates were not claimed at the meeting Saturday, 
but efforts will be made to have arrangements per- 
fected that will enable Kings county to stage her 
exhibition during the last week of September. 

Now that Hanford has set the pattern by declaring 
herself, we will be pleased to hear of similar action 
on the part of some eight or ten other associations. 
The time is ripe to get together and arrange dates 
for the entire sea.son in such manner that there will 
be no conflicts. 

Who will be next? 

o 

TO STALLION OWNERS. 



With mares that were bred during the early portion 
of 1915 already beginning to drop foals, it behooves 
the stallion owner to get a hustle on himself and go 
out after the business. Breeding operations are not 
as heavy as in former years but there will be more 
mares mated to good horses this year than was the 
case last season, we are confident, and dull business 
in any line of mercantile activity is no sign for the 
easing up of the spirit of competition. Stallion 
owners are inclined to say "What's the use?" under 
the same circumstances that set the merchant to 
scratching gravel just a little bit deeper and going 
after what trade there is just so much harder. The 
man who gets the trade that keeps him going in dull 
times is the man that has the most to offer for the 
money and is most successful in keeping the public 
apprised of this fact. The sheriff's sign appears 
with the greatest frequency upon the doors of estab- 
lishments that kept only mediocre goods and then 
made but a half-hearted effort to dispose of them. 

The best mediums for setting the wares of the 
stallion owner before his customers, the owners of 
brood mares who do not support private stallions, 
are the announcements of service in the columns of 
the turf paper covering his particular section of the 
land, and the card or folder giving the pedigree of 
his horse and a summary of the performance of his 
get, if he be already a proven sire, or a synopsis of 
the grounds for the belief that he will become a sire 
should he be a youngster yet untried in this respect. 
The Breeder and Sportsman offers service of both 
kinds to its patrons, and recommends the use of its 
columns and its compiling and printing facilities, 
secure in the knowledge that money so invested by 
breeders and owners has been returned fo them with 
interest and profit for a period of thirty-tour years. 
Only a cursory glance through our files is needed to 
show that the most successful horsemen have been 
liberal users of printer's ink as exemplified by our 
advertising pages and reading columns. 

There has never existed greater incentive to the 
production of trotting speed than afforded by the 
immediate future, for the shortage in aged perform 
ers, caused by the falling off in breeding operations 
for the past few years, is beginning to make Itself 
manifest in no uncertain way. The great sales com- 
panies of the east are facing a shortage of aged con- 
signments to their auctions, and the young things are 
coming largely from Kentucky and Virginia. There is 
in California a great array of well bred mares, capa- 
ble of producing performers of the highest degree of 
excellence, that have not been bred for the last 
season or so owing to local conditions, and stallion 
owners should make every effort to secure the book- 
ings of every one of these matrons this season. 
Most of them will be well bred, and the greater por- 
tion of them will be mated to the stallions that are 
best kept in the public eye. 

The reasons for this are both numerous and patent. 
If your horse is not worth advertising there Is a 
strong probability that he is not worthy of patronage. 
Have we your ord(?r for either cards or a se.ison ad., 
or both? 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 5, 1916. 



The Horse for Modern Demands 

THE LIMITATIONS OF THE TROTTER'S PRESENT FIELD OTT ST^wyinF 



Among the interesting communications that have 
found their way to the office of the Breeder and 
Sportsman during the early portion of the present 
year is one from a stallion owner in California who 
has found business fairly satisfactory in the face of 
the slump that has existed for the last several sea- 
sons. His horse has made three seasons in the 
same locality, his colts have found a ready market 
at fair figures, and a number of good mares have 
been booked to him for the present breeding season. 
After telling of the business as he finds it in his 
own case, he makes the following observations con- 
cerning the situation in general: 

"In conclusion, it is my opinion that the owners of 
standard bred stallions are to blame more than any- 
one else actively associated with breeding for the 
slump in this class of horses, largely by keeping 
stallions entire and in service that have nothing to 
recommend them but a pedigree of speed inheritance. 
The pedigree is all right, but the farmer cannot race 
his horse or go to market or plow with him on that 
alone. He must have size, compact form and intelli- 
gence. A rattle headed horse is nearer nothing than 
anything a man can own, no matter what other good 
points he may have. Castrate more of these light 
boned, nervous stallions and offer the farmer breeder 
a horse of the 'Zomblack' type. Then, if he doesn't 
get a race horse, he will have a good serviceable 
animal to drive and work, one with a kind, tractable 
disposition, and one that the owner is proud of. 

"I find the small breeder a good customer when 
you can show him you have a useful horse to breed 
to. I remember when the saddle horse was down at 
the bottom of the ladder, wasn't worth his oats. 
Result: A few sensible admirers got together and 
by judicious breeding have made the saddler the most 
profitable of all light horses. 

"With the standardbred, speed will always be one 
of the most important considerations; combine this 
with compact foi-m and .intelligence and you have the 
most useful horse in the world. 'Size enough for the 
plow, style enough for the carriage and speed enough 
for the race track' form the requirements of the horse 
the breeder should endeavor to raise, not speed alone. 
When this becomes the universal practice, the stand- 
ard bred will soon push his heavier rivals to the wall 
and occupy his rightful place, the peer of all horses. 

"Give us the county fair, smaller purses, overnight 
entries, and every trainer in California will be busy 
and every man that owns a fairly good horse will 
have a chance to make money." 

While we agree unreservedly with our correspond- 
ent that there are a great many stallions retained in 
service which should be subjected to the process of 
castration for the benefit of the breed in general, 
and while we admit that his views concerning the 
type of horse which breeders should endeavor to 
produce are applicable to the situation in many local- 
ities, the horse which he advances as the ideal type 
that will save the business and assure it of a long 
lived prosperity, possessing "size enough for the 
plow, style enough for the carriage and speed enough 
for the race track," is not one whose production will 
ease the burden upon the American breeder as a 
whole, for a number of reasons which are readily 
apparent to the man who has been trying to market 
his output of horseflesh for the last several years. 

There was a time, of course, when the demand for 
carriage, road and general utility horses afforded a 
ready market for all trotting bred horses of a certain 
amount of substance, soundness and docility, whether 
or not they would do to race, and there are yet com- 
munities where the horse of this class is in demand 
and plays a very important part in the daily life of 
the resident of those sections. Through the advent of 
the inexpensive motor car and the gasoline driven 
tractor of many types, the field of endeavor of the 
general purpose horse and the roadster has been 
very greatly reduced and the market price of the 
same very materially affected, in spite of the fact 
that the breeding of the light harness horse family 
has constantly improved and its inherent qualities 
of general usefulness have been enhanced. The 
breeder who has produced, during the five years 
last passed, the trotter of a generally serviceable 
type has found himself "out of pocket" as the result 
of his operations at the end of the year, while the 
one who has made speed his prime consideration, 
and has succeeded in producing the same to a certain 
degree, has been able to find a fairly ready market 
at figures that enabled him to break even or a little 
better. 

While California offers many wonderful natural 



advantages for the production of the horse in an 
advanced stage of perfection, the expense attached 
to the operation is such that the selling of the 
finished product of the farm of the breeder of the 
trotter at the average market price prevalent 
throughout the state leaves no margin of profit. In 
many localities the grazing season is not of long 
duration, though in certain sections horses may for- 
age for themselves for by far the greater portion of 
the year. In other sections breeders depend largely 
upon alfalfa, which is plentiful and but moderately 
costly, but a continuous diet of alfalfa is not condu- 
cive to the production of a horse that will stand up 
under any sort of prolonged and extreme exertion, 
though intelligently fed as a balance for the daily 
ration it is most excellent and beneficial. A famil- 
iarity with conditions in widely scattered portions 
of the state leads the writer to the opinion that the 
man who produces trotting horses and "gets off" at 
an average cost of ten dollars a month per head for 
horses not in training is doing fairly well. These 
figures are excessive for some localities and are 
none too high for others, as will he attested upon 
application to breeders whose operations are con- 
ducted on a scale that necessitates the close keeping 
of costs and the employment of strict business meth- 
ods. 

On government estimates there are in the state of 
California at present approximately 493,000 horses 
of an average value of .$96, as compared with 483,000 
of an average value of $117 five years ago. Grazing 
and agricultural lands are increasing in value rather 
than decreasing, and in the face of these figures 
where does the trotting breeder who produces the 
average horse "get off"? As stated above there are 
localities where the all purpose horse is yet in strong 
demand and in these sections the breeder comes out 
with a profit even if his horses will not do to race 
save in occasional instances — and by the way these 
same localities are as a rule the ones in which the 
horse may be bred and brought to a serviceable age 
under the most economical conditions. On rare 
occasions a trotter or a team is bought for park use 
or show ring purposes at a fair price, but the demand 
is limited and the market over supplied. There re- 
mains this one alternative for the breeder of the 
trotter, taking the situation as a whole: "THE 
PRODUCTION OF HORSES THAT WILL RACE." 
These have earning capacity in excess of the average 
horse that justifies the public in paying an enhanced 
price for them to an extent that returns the breeder 
a living profit. 

In spile of the hard game that horsemen have 
bucked here on the coast of late years, there are 
a few who have made breeding and racing their sole 
business and have made a living and something over 
for the "rainy day." The writer can do no better for 
the fraternity at large than to relate to them the 
ideas of one of the most successful of these gentle- 
men just alluded to, advanced at different times dur- 
ing the past several months when the future of the 
trotting industry was the foremost topic of conver- 
sation. For the sake of brevity and conciseness the 
gist of many such little talks may be presented as 
follows: 

"I have been estimating my costs pretty carefully 
for the last few years and find that they have been 
constantly increasing until now, if I give brood 
mares or other pastured horses proper care and 
attention, they cost me not less than ten dollars per 
head a month, possibly a little more. This, of course, 
means the cost of labor, grass, hay and grain when 
needed, interest on the capital represented on a con- 
servative valuation, and minor items that would be 
prime considerations of any man engaged in an ordi- 
nary business pursuit — and my business is breeding 
and racing horses. I have been at it a good many 
years, and while the demands for road and business 
horses formerly furnished a most welcome outlet for 
all of my products that would not stand the gaff or 
lacked the speed required to go to the races, my aim 
has always been to breed the race horse. Now that 
the market for the 'by-product' of my establishment 
has been curtailed the race horse is more than ever 
my aim — and not merely that, either; his production 
is a necessity, absolutely. This puts my operations 
entirely upon a race horse producing basis, and with 



speed I require the attributes of intelligence, sound- 
ness, and general individual excellence that play such 
important parts in the makeup of the campaigner 
that can be expected to be a success today. I want 
size enough to guarantee strength and stamina, but 
above that I am not particular. 

"To get my affairs on this basis has required a 
good deal of culling and selecting. I own a number 
of mares and stallions, and breed both to my own 
horses and to the best sires owned in the west when 
I consider that I have a filly that would produce 
better, for reasons largely based upon pedigree and 
performance, to some horse other than my own. My 
stallidhs do public service, and the fact that I mate 
my own mares to them is their initial recommenda- 
tion to the breeding fraternity, their second recom- 
mendation, and most conclusive one, being the record 
of the performance of their get as found in the sum- 
maries of the season's races. I do not use a horse 
myself or put him in service unless I have the best 
of grounds for the belief that he will sire horses that 
will race, for under present conditions those are the 
only kind that it pays me or my patrons to raise. 
If I am mistaken in a horse, I am the first person to 
acknowledge the error and retire him from service. 
My brood mares have been selected in the same way 
and additions to their ranks are made on probation 
only. I limit the band of mares I am to maintain to 
a very moderate number and the older ones are in 
every instance proven producers of race horses, most 
of them for two or three generations. The younger 
ones are selected from lines which have been produc- 
tive in the past, but if they themselves do not prove 
prolific, or even if their produce are fast and game 
but of the unlucky variety, as sometimes happens, 
their term of life in my pastures is short. They go to 
market "as is," and whatever sum they bring is 
accepted without complaint on my part. My horses 
of both sexes must do more than merely promise 
results — they must accomplish them. In spite of my 
precautions I get a certain number of foals that do 
not mature into horses that will race (and sell them 
at a loss), and every other breeder finds himself in the 
same boat; but I do get a sufficiently large num- 
ber that will race and that will win money or sell for 
many times the price of the average horse to make 
my operations both pleasant and profitable. I may 
add, incidentally, that it is a source of much gratifica- 
tion to know that I am steadily producing a larger 
percentage of horses that will and do race and fewer 
of the other kind. 

"Without indulging in any egotistical comment or 
meaning to throw boquets at myself for applying 
common business principles to my operations and 
thereby avoiding some of the hardships that have 
befallen some of my brother breeders, I believe 
firmly that mine is the only system that will pay the 
trotting horse breeder a profit year in and year out, 
and I mean not only the stock farm proprietor but 
the man who owns one or two mares and patronizes 
public stallions. Unless your mares produce race 
horses after a fair trial, discard them; unless the get 
of your stallions or those you patronize stand the test 
of today on the race track, seek elsewhere for the 
proper mate for your matrons. The man who fails 
to conduct his operations upon such a basis has small 
grounds for complaint if the same are productive of 
loss in place of profit. Take a good long whiff of 
gasoline and make up your mind to breed trotters 
that will race. Then you can buy more gasoline. I 
use it myself and I like the results attained in the 
way of pleasure and quick transportation. The exact 
date on which I last drove a horse and buggy on the 
road save in a purely professional manner has slipped 
my mind. There are a lot of other good horse breed- 
ers and horse lovers who are in the same fix, and if 
we ourselves will not use our own best products for 
the conduct of our every-day affairs and the pursuit 
of pleasurable recreation, why rail against the gen- 
eral public for forsaking the leather line in favor of 
the steering wheel? 

"Me for the trotter that will trot!" 

These opinions are the result of a good many years 
of successful endeavor, and will be found most 
timely at this moment, when the breeding season is 
beginning. 



Saturday, February 5, 1916] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE "SWIPE"— FROM THE INSIDE. 



It was well past four o'clock, one afternoon last 
week, when a bunch of tired, cold and hungry 
grooms, swipes or caretakers, were "stalling around" 
(after being "on the job" from 6:30 a. m.), waiting 
for the "head jock" to vacate the warm and cozy 
office, and beat it home to his steam-heated "shack," 
so that they could get a chance to warm up their 
shins; and thaw out their numb fingers and toes. 

After shaking up the fire and getting up a good 
blaze, all huddled around the stove, and one of them 
grabbed up the Horse Review and started to read out 
loud some of the items that would interest an ordi- 
nary "swipe." 

When he .got to "Marque's" story. "Grooms as Fac- 
tors in the Sport," a vote was taken, and it was 
decided to postpone the reading of it until after "bean 
time." 

Well, after putting away under our belts the one- 
twenty-first part of a four-dollar-a-week meal ticket, 
we hustled back to the stable and finished up our 
chores, such as watering, bedding and taking care of 
a few suspicious "fingers." This being done, we next 
made up our "flops." "Now, get the Review and read 
that 'Groom Dope* to us," was the word, so it was 
done. 

After the story was re-read several times, we de- 
cided that the first four paragraphs were O. K. But 
the fifth — "There are good and bad grooms," it read. 
Here an old-time groom who is "guideless" this win- 
ter, spoke up and asked the question, "What is the 
difference between a good and bad groom?" Some 
said one that could keep up a cripple or bad-legged 
horse; some said one that could and would only take 
care of one horse; still another said, "One that could 
take care of a 'livery stable string.' " 

"You are all wrong," said the old-timer. "I know 
what I am talking about, too. Here is the difference 
in a nut-shell. A good, high-class groom gets one 
dollar a day and his feed. A second-class groom, or 
rather, one that is employed by a second-class train- 
er, receives eighty-three and one-third cents per day 
and his beans. So you see, the actual difference be- 
tween them is, practically and financially speaking, 
sixteen and two-thirds cents per day, and his beans. 

"Take that case of Johnnie Clark, receiving a 
check for a thousand dollars as a present for taking 
care of Peter Scott. This will, no doubt, drive a lot 
of 'Johnny Plows' into the ranks of the 'swipes.' They 
don't realize that this is a world's record tip for a 
groom. We occasionally hear of some 'big hearted' 
jock divorcing himself from a hundred-dollar bill 
after grabbing off a five or ten thousand-dollar stake, 
but these cases are rare, indeed; and I'll bet that I 
can count all the names of the grooms that were 
lucky enough to grab off a hundred or more during 
the past ten years, on the fingers of my two hands. 
So, let me impress the fact upon the future would-be 
groom that the above cases are generally classed with 
the l-to-10,000 shots, and instead of receiving any 
tip at all, after rubbing a winner all season and 
living upon a 'six-bit' allowance in an endeavor to 
save the eighty-three and one-third cents that is 
dished out at the end of the month, so that he can 
buy a cheap suit, or pair of shoes to carry him over 
the winter, he generally has his shoes pulled off at 
the last meeting, be it a hundred or a thousand miles 
from home, to rustle or beat his way back there 
again. 

"That there are no unions or regular hours of work 
we all know. We are on duty like a bunch of sol- 
diers — sleep when you can and eat w-hen get a 
chance. Of course, we will all have to admit that it 
would hardly be possible to have any regular hours. 
But it would be possible, if the boys would all stick 
together, to have a uniform scale of wages. Of 
course, all of the Grand Circuit stables pay their boys 
one dollar a day and allow them enough so that they 
can eat three square meals a day. But there are a 
great many so-called high-class stables shipped 
around the country that expect a groom to deliver 
the same class of goods as they do down the 'Big 
Ring,' and also keep on a respectable front, on the 
old-time scale of eighty-three and one-third cents, 
with a two-bit allowance for meals. 

"Boys, it can't be done, if you ever expect to save 
a nickel. How would some of our top jocks feel if 
they had to load a car of horses and the pile of junk 
that every stable carries, and then, after you are red 
hot and covered with perspiration, go to some cheap 
eating place and try to get the wrinkles out of your 
bread basket on a two-bit lay-out, while the boss, who 
probably don't do a stroke outside of stand around 
and look wise, goes to some high-class dump, takes a 
bath, changes clothes, has some liquid refreshments, 
and then a feed that costs a couple of bones; then 
says, 'Now I feel pretty fair,' and jumps aboard a 
Pullman and beats it for the next town. He gets 
there in the morning and waits for the poor, tired- 
out swipes to blow in with the horses and junk. 
Probably the train Is several hours late, and conse- 
quently we don't get a thing to eat or drink until we 
arrive at the track; this, oftentimes, after we have 
led our horses several miles from the railroad station 
to the track. Do we eat then? Oh, no! We have 
got to feed and water our horses first. By this time 
the van carrying the trunks, junk and sulkies arrives 
and this has got to be unloaded and placed in order. 
An awning has to be put up and the sulkies and carts 
put together. And all this time the top-jock is wait- 
ing for us to get one ready to jog. It may be getting 
along toward noon, but he never asks us whether we 
have had any breakfast or not; and if we ask him 




Story of LT.2:12i-^ 



-SIRE OF THE DAM OK PETKK M.\C 2:0:!;i;:: 



Away back in 1890 there arrived in Tacoma, from 
what part of the world I do not now recall, a young 
man named Jinson James. The boy had a great love 
for horses and procured for him.self a job at the 
Stony Oak Stock Farm, owned by Dr. Wintermute, 
where James Hickey was at that time the trainer. 
Like many another young man, Jinson James had 
hopes that he would some day own a great race 
horse, and after a season at Stony Oak Farm he 
decided that he would go to California, which was at 
that time the world's greatest breeding center for the 
light harness horse. A few members of the family 
of Dexter Prince had been racing around Tacoma 
and had impressed young James by the excellence of 
their general qualities, so he picked out Lodi as his 
objective point and hied himself for that little city, 
in due time procuring a job at L. M. Morse's Live 
Oak Farm, at that time the home of Dexter Prince. 

For about a year the youngster stuck to his job as 
farm hand at Live Oaks, feasting his eyes meanwhile 
upon the horses owned by his employer, but one day 
he decided to quit and called for his time. Morse 
at the moment was evidently a bit short on coin of 
the realm (something that has happened at various 
times both before and since to a good many folks in 
the trotting horse business) and asked James if he 
could and would take a colt as part pay. Jinson 
found this proposition acceptable, and as he had a 
pretty good line on the horseflesh then on the farm 
he lost little time in making his selection — a very 
elegant three-year-old bay stallion of good breeding, 
with black points and a beautiful flowing tail. Taking 
this colt at a valuation of three hundred dollars and 
getting the balance of his wages in cash, James 
said goodby to Lodi and started back to the north- 
west, eventually, by means of boat and road, arriving 
at Tacoma with the horse in excellent condition. 

Many is the time that Jinson James sat and told 
me of the good points of his bay stallion, and that 
his name was J. J., sired by Live Oak Hero, a crip- 
pled son of Director and Nelly Grant by Santa Claus; 
that his dam was a mare named Ada Dy Dexter 
Prince, his grandam Ida W. by Abbottsford, his third 
dam by Winthrop, and his fourth dam a daughter of 
Chieftain. We who were friends and admirers of 
Jinson James and his three-year-old colt were sure 
that J. J. would be a great horse, as he looked the 
part in every particular and was a grand, bold-going 
trotter. 

Before leaving California with his most prized pos- 
session, James had started the colt in a three-year- 
old race at Napa which he had won in straight heats, 
defeating a field of five and taking a record of 2:26. 
After arriving at Tacoma he effected a combination 
with a trainer from Kansas named Wickersham and 



who was at that time training horses over the mile 
track at Tacoma, the basis of the agreement being 
that Wick would train J. J. in return for poor James' 
services as caretaker to the other steeds in the 
stable, and by this sacrifice on the part of his owner 
J. J. was enabled to have his education at the trot 
continued. 

Well, in due time Wickersham started east via 
Montana and Colorado points, taking with him Jinson 
James and his bay stud. As J. J. he acquired a record 
of 2:18Vi but met with no great amount of success 
as a race horse, and I notice that before he took his 
fastest record his name had been changed to J. T., 
probably for registration purposes. James sold him 
to some folks in Michigan, and I think it was after 
this sale that he took his record — anyway it was 
after he had gotten out of Wickersham's hands, 
for a man named Hall gave him his mark of 2:12i/4 
as J. T. at Terre Haute in the fall of 1900. The day 
is one that a good many folks remember well to the 
present time, as on the same day that the one-time 
pride of Jinson James' heart trotted in 2: 12 '4, The 
Abbott and Ed Geers set the world's trotting record 
at 2:03Vt, and the California bred pacer Coney, 
driven by Ed Gaylord of Denver, set the amateur 
pacing record at 2:03%. 

For a season or so prior to this time (as well as 
for some years subsequent thereto) J. T. did stud 
duty in the neighborhoods of Vassar and Bay City, 
Michigan, and it was during the year preceding the 
one in which he took his record that John Rhyland 
sent to his court the bay mare Letitia 2:18%, the 
result of this service being the great race trotter 
Lillian R. 2:04i/^, now the dam of Captain David 
Shaw's sensational stallion Peter Mac 2:03%, re- 
garded by almost every horseman who knows him 
well as the most logical candidate for two-minute * 
honors in training today — and in looking at the pic- 
tures of Peter Mac it seems to me that I have cheated 
old Pappy Time out of about a score of years and 
am again out at the old stables at Tacoma, gazing 
with admiration at the beautiful bay colt J. J., 
brought here by the poor boy Jinson James. 

Many and many is the time I wonder what has 
become of Jinson James. He was a nice boy and a 
real horse lover, and it is through his love of a good 
horse and his excellent judgment of one that the 
horse world of today is singing the praises of Peter 
Mac. I hope he is alive and prosperous and able to 
enjoy reading of what his first horse produced by 
siring Lillian R., for the satisfaction of knowing that 
his judgment as a selector of a stallion was sound is, 
I think, about all that Jinson James ever got out of 
his ownership of a grand trotter and a beautiful 
horse. C. A. HARRISON. 



for the price of a meal, he is mighty apt to ask us, 

'What in the h did you do with that dollar I gave 

you yesterday morning?' By the time he conies across 
and you, tired, dry and hungry, head for the grand 
stand for a bite to eat, you will find it mighty hard 
to get by the 'thirst emporium' without having at 
least one drink. You have got to be quite a financier 
to make your six-bits last all day, but you figure like 
this: I missed my breakfast, so I will spend one- 
half of it for a drink, and add the other half to my 
dinner money; eat a good feed and then wear the 
'muzzle' the balance of the day; or get a sandwich 
and a beer for supper. Yea, bo — It's some life!" 

"What 'Marque' says about .50 per cent, of us bring 
laid off in the fall should road, 80 per cent. And 
where he says that a boy is often handed three head 
to take care of during the winter, is the worst 'pipe 
dream' I ever heard him spring. Ten, twelve and 
fifteen head is a closer and safer <>atimate, and at that 
the poor groom is often forced to put in the winter 
at reduced wages, and also help carry along a few 
of his less fortunate 'Knights of the Rag.' " 

There is no sentiment lost between the average 
owner, trainer and groom. It matters not how faith- 
ful they have been, when they are laid off they are 
thrown upon their own resources. 

I know of one old-time groom that had charge of 
a now retired champion, and after spending the bet- 
ter part of his life doing so (during which time the 
owner realized close on to a hundred thousand dol- 
lars, going exhibition miles), and then this poor old 
groom was handed six or seven colts to take care of. 
This was quite a task for a man who was in the 
habit of rubbing only one, even if he was a cham- 
pion. Consequently when he was offered another 
position to rub a champion in a distant part of the 
country, he decided to take it, and notified the owner 



that he would leave the day before the first of the 
following month. This gave the owner ten days' 
notice to get sonH> one in his place, and it would give 
the groom a chance to go to work on his new job 
on the first of tlie month. Now he had worked for 
this man faithfully for eight or ten years and had 
never missed a day, but still when he received his 
final clieck he was "docked" for that one day. 

Still, some of us say that sentiment plays an Im- 
portant part in the game! — Libertyville, in the Horse 
Review. « 



AN "IMPORTED" HORSE STORY. 



One incident of many is worthy to relate. In the 
2: If) pace at Salem in 1!)13 Yedno was in a race with 
Hal (Jray. Red Rock, Hal Chief, J. C. B. and Uncle 
H., Mac N. and Lady Vorton.- Hay Gray, then owned 
in Calgary, won two heats in 2:09 and 2:10'/^, when 
his owner. Fred Johnston, who was i)assing through 
the paddock, noticed a few fellows drinking In Yed- 
no's stall from a bottle. Strange as it may seem, 
after her owner, trainer, driver and friends took a 
drink, they immediately proceeded to pour the bal- 
ance of the bottle into Yedno's throat, an operation 
she made no resistance against and in fact acted as 
If she liked it. The owner of Hal Gray then pro- 
ceeded over to his own horse's stall and informed his 
train<'r of the circumstances and warned that driver 
to be careful to keep away as far as possible from 
what he expected would be a drunken horse and 
driver. The next and concluding heat was called 
immediately afterwards and, hard to believe, Yedno 
finished second practically guideless, as she really 
got no assistance from her driver in his condition, 
and the final quarter of that mile she stepped in 29% 
seconds, and was only beaten a neck In 2:11: — Cal- 
gary Herald. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 5, 1916. 



BIG PERCENTAGE OF NOMINATIONS KEPT 
GOOD IN KENTUCKY FUTURITY. 



A total of 763 colts and fillies have been kept Rood 
in the Kentucky Futurity for foal.s of 1915. While 
not the highest figure yet attained in the futurity, 
tliis number represents the highest percentage of the 
original entry list ever recorded in any colt stake for 
trotters, as only 842 mares were nominated in April. 
Two hundred and sixty-four nominators are repre- 
sented and 33 have named five or more each, or a 
total of 433. Walnut Hall Farm, Donerail, Ky., con- 
tinues to hold first place with 71, sired by the farm's 
coterie of great stallions, Manrico, Walnut Hall, 
Moko and San Francisco. Patchen Wilkes Stock 
Farm, Lexington, Ky., is second with 41, the most of 
them by Peter Donna and the balance by I'eter the 
Great and the farm's other stallions. J. R. Magowan 
of Mt. Sterling, Ky., is third with 23, all but two being 
sired by his popular young sire, J. Malcolm Forbes; 
Allen Farm, of Pittsfield, Mass., is fourth with 21, thv. 
majority of which are by Pingara. The following is 
a list of nominators with five or more entries: 

Walnut Hall l'"arm, 71: Patchen Wilkes Farm, 41 J. 
R. Magowan, 23; Allen Farm, 21; Curies Neck Farm, 
21: C. C. Watts, 16; J. E. Madden, 16; Hillanddale 
Farm, 15; D. M. Look, 14; John R. Thompson, 14; 
A. 15. Coxe, 13; Empire City Farms, 12; H. J. Schles- 
inger, 12; L. E. Brown, 10; U. G. Saunders, 10; J. O. 
Winston, 10; W. F. McAllister, 9; Midway Stock 
Farm, 9; Dromore Farm, 9; Mike Bowerman, 9; Beau 
Ideal Farm, 8; Hudson River Stock Farm, 8; R. L. 
Nash, 8; John L. Snyder, 8; Paul C. Wilson, 6; C. B. 
Shaffer, 6; Charles E. Dean, 6; Forest Park Farm, 6; 
F. E. Masland, 5; Empire Farms, 5; Cruickston Farm, 
5; II. N. Bain, and Comsewogue Farm, 5. 

One hundred and fifty-four stallions have sired the 
list of eligibles and 22 sires are represented by 10 or 
more weanlings, or 476 altogether. The list is again 
headed by Peter the Great, with 52. One of the 
features deserving of special mention is the remark- 
able showing by the young stallion, J. Malcolm 
Forbes 2:08. half-brother of Peter the Great, and 
Manrico 2:07Vi, which was one of the greatest three- 
year-old colt trotters that ever lived, which hold sec- 
ond and third positions, with 46 and 35 respectively. 
Peter Donna is fourth and he is followed by the two 
Walnut Hall stallions, San Francisco and Moko. 
Twelve of the select list have records of better than 
2:10, sixteen better than 2:15, nineteen better than 
2:20, and two are without records, namely Moko and 
Bingara; but this is not because they failed to pos- 
sess speed. The following table is the select stallion 
list: 

Peter the Great 2:07V,, 52; J. Malcolm Forbes 2:08, 
46; Manrico 2:07i4, 35; Peter Donna 2:08, 32; San 
Francisco 2:07%, 31; Moko, 25; General Watts 
2:06%, 24; Axworthy 2:15>^, 24; The Harvester 2:01, 
22; Walnut Hall, 2:08V4. 21; Bingara, 21; Northern 
Man 2:06V^, 17; Azoff 2:14%, 17; Justice Brooke 
2:091/^, 15; Morgan Axworthy 2:17, 14; Siliko 2:11%, 
13; The Exponent 2:11%, 13: Guy Axworthy 2:08%, 
12: BinjoUa 2:17%, 11; Dillon Axworthy 2:11%, 11; 
Beirne Holt 2:lli,4, 10, and Peter Wood 2: 19 14, 10. 

It is always interesting to know where the entries 
come from — which sections continue to maintain 
their breeding interests. Thirty-three states and 
Canada have furnished the entries. Kentucky leads 
with 274, an increase of 50 over last year; New 
York is again second with 109; Ohio takes third 
place with 57, Illinois fourth with 54, and Massachu- 
setts fifth with 45. In 1914, 698 weanlings were kept 
in the futurity as against 763 in the futurity just 
closed. These figures ought to be encouraging to 
trotting interests for they indicated marked confi- 
dence in tlie future among breeders. The following 
table gives the entries by states: 

Kentucky, 274; New York, 109; Ohio, 57; Illinois, 
54; Massachusetts, 45; Pennsylvania, 38; Indiana, 
28; Michigan, 21; West Virginia, 18; Wisconsin, 18; 
Nebraska, 17; Virginia, 14; Tennessee, 11; Califor- 
nia, 8; ('anada, 7; Alabama, 6; Maryland, 4; Con- 
necticut. 4; Iowa, 4; New Jersey, 4; Louisiana, 3; 
New Hampshire, 3; Missouri, 2; Georgia, 2; Minne- 
sota, 2; Oklahoma. 2: Utah, 1; Rhode Island, 1; Flor- 
ida, 1; District of Columbia, 1; Kansas, 1; South Car- 
olina, 1, and Vermont, 1. 

Prominent among the foals are those of Uhleen, 
Norvolo Belle, Harvest Girl, Notelet, dam of The 
Harvester, and Markala, dam of Walnut Tree. The 
stake book will be published following closing of 
entries to the futurity for foals of 1916, April 1. — 
Western Horseman. 

o 

My Irene S. (2) 2:28% is maintaining her record 
as one of the most prolific young matrons in the 
land, having recently given birth to a bay colt by 
Carlokin 2:07i/i, hence a full brother to that good 
futurity trotter Esperanza (3) 2:09. Iran Belle (dam 
of Old Folks 2:11%) by Iran Alto 2:12V,, dam the 
triple producer Anna Belle 2:27V^ (dam of Robert 
I. 2:08%, etc.) by Dawn 2:18% has ahso foaled a bay 
colt to the cover of Carlokin, while Reta H. 2:12V^ 
(dam of Byron (3) 2:15V^) by McKinney 2:11% and 
Subito (dam of White Sox 2:05%, The Lark (4) 
2:09%, etc.) by Steinway (3) 2:25% are both suck- 
ling new born foals by Copa de Oro 2:01, the former 
a bay filly and the latter a chestnut colt. Each of 
the four mares will be bred back to the sire of her 
present foal, and the indications are that both Carlo- 
kin and Copa de Oro will be kept busier this season 
than ever before. 



• • 

i NOTES and NEWS i 

;i..„,..^.,„......._.....^.,^......^.....,.,..^.,..._^,^..^..^,.,.^ 

Good-by to racing at Tia Juana for the present. 

The meeting deserved a better fate, as from all 
we can learn at this distance it was very well con- 
ducted. 

Have you ordered a season announcement for your 
stallion yet? The man who does the best stallion 
business will be found advertising both early and 
often. 

<S><S><?> 

Send us a memorandum of the foals as they are 
born. Start them off in life with the benefit of a 
little publicity that costs you nothing and interests 
your friends. 

Directum I. 1:56% and Etawah 2:03, both of whom 
have in all probability raced their last competitive 
affair, will be prepared for exhibitions and possible 
new records this season. 

The stewards of the Great Western Circuit have 
been summoned to meet February 15 at the Audito- 
rium Hotel in Chicago, Secretary Smollinger having 
issued the call. 

That "Clean and Slippery" axle grease manufac- 
tured by the Whittier-Coburn Company of this city 
will add life to the bearings of all kinds of vehicles 
and farming implements. Try it once and find out 
its good qualities for yourself. 

«><«><$> 

Zona B. 2: 25 14 by Zolock 2:05%, dam the double 
producer Hytu by Happy Prince 10546, has been 
sent to Los Angeles from Globe, Arizona, by A. W. 
Sydnor and will be bred this season to W. G. Dur- 
fee's great sire of pacers. Copa de Oro 2:01. 
<?><$><$> 

The Moko family annexed another nice record a 
few days ago when Dayspring won the 2:30 pace over 
the Mount Royal track at Montreal in 2:11, 2:10% 
and 2:13'/^, the three fastest heats ever witnessed on 
the frozen footing. His dirt track record is only 
2:14%. 

«>4><$> 

The Canadian Sportsman is the latest of our ex- 
changes to print the picture of Vernon McKinney as 
th(? fastest horse that ever stood for service in the 
dominion, giving Winnipeg as the scene of his activi- 
ties for the present season. Our advertising columns 
mav enlighten them on the matter. 

<J><8><S> 

The brood mares Yolanda 2:14% by McKinney 
2:111/4 and Mary Gordon 2:09% (dam of Onward 
McGregor (3) 2:23%) by Gordon, recently purchased 
from J. N. Colomb of this city by Bert Baker, the 
San Diego county horseman, are at Pleasanton and 
will probably be mated With The Anvil 2:02%. 

The Fasig-Tipton company is complaining of a 
shortage of aged horses for the forthcoming mid- 
winter auction, though there is a fair supply of year- 
lings, mostly from Kentucky. It is not improbable, 
from present indications, that the event will be 
confined to two or three days instead of the custom- 
ary four. 

<S><J><» 

The Sacramento folks have been indulging in a bit 
of bartering in trotters of late, S. H. Cowell securing 
fromJohnny Quinn the good gelding Albaloma 2:08%. 
while the Silva stable has received an addition in 
the shape of the former Fresno trotter Con Brino 
2:14V^, who is reported as being one of the oily kind 
for the coming season. 

<$> <S> ^ 

Tuesday, February fifteenth, will be a busy day in 
Chicago for the trotting horse fraternity, the day's 
events including the meeting of the stewards of the 
Great Western Circuit, the assembly of the represen- 
tatives of state fairs and expositions, the biennial 
congress of the members of the American Trotting 
Association and, at night, the convention of the Turf 
Journals Association. * 

The rains have deterred training operations all 
over the state, but California horses will be ready 
as usual when the bell taps. It looks like a big year 
for the stock grazers and the grain men who had 
their land seeded before the long wet spell set in. 
Consequently there will be that much more incentive 
to excellent and numerous exhibits of all kinds at 
the fairs this fall. 

■^'$><$> 

Charley DeRyder was one of those "fleeting visi- 
tors" in our midst one day this week, having brought 
the ladies of the household to the city for the day, 
and dropped in at this office long enough to notify 
us that the bookings to The Anvil 2:02% began 
to loom up, and that he believed the great trotter 
would serve fifty or more mares this season, which 
will be a most excellent patronage in the light of 
existing conditions. If the MacKenzie youngster, 
Anvilite (2) 2:22%, may be taken as a fair speci- 
men of his get he is going to prove a wonderful sire 
of speed and individuality. 



The twenty-seventh annual renewal of the Ken- 
tucky futurity is announced under the same condi- 
tions that governed number twenty-six of the same 
series and will close on April first, for mares bred in 
1915 and due to foal this .season. California breeders 
desiring to patronize the stake may obtain all partic- 
ulars by addressing Secretary J. W. Williams of Lex- 
ington. 

Locust Jack 2:06i^, now fifteen years of age, made 
a reappearance in harness in the final event of the 
ice meeting at Montreal a few days ago. The old 
gray hero won the first heat in 2: 2514, the fastest 
time of the race, but gradually faded and was di.s- 
tanced in the fourth and final heat. He was one good 
trot horse eight or nine years ago and it is remark- 
able that he should be in shape to make even as good 
a showing as he did at this late date. 

<S><S><S> 

At the recent meeting of the Kentucky Trotting 
Horse Breeders' Association the former officers were 
elected as follows: Ed A. Tipton president, R. C. 
Estill and J. R. Hagyard vice-presidents, J. W. Wil- 
liams secretary, and Miss Gertrude Matlock assistant 
secretary, while the board of directors is composed 
of Ed A. Tipton, R. C. Estill, J. R. Hagyard, J. D. 
Grover, A. B. Coxe, R. C. Estill, J. R. Allen and 
David M. Look. 

<S> <S> <S> 

The Review Racing Guide made port some days 
ago, considerably behind her customary schedule, but 
that other famous landgoing liner, the Year Book, 
has not yet been reported outside the heads and 
grave fears are entertained for her safety. However, 
there has been a strong play on her on the overdue 
boards at Lloyds' at the Marine Exchange so there 
must be some foundation for the belief that she will 
eventually cast anchor In Horselibrary Cove. 
<S> <8> 

F. B. Dupree of San Diego has sent the double- 
gaited mare Axnola to be bred to Carlokin 2:07l^ 
and the cross is one that should be productive of 
speed to a gratifying extent. Axnola was bred by 
A. J. Molera of this city and is by Excel (a son of 
Axtell (3) 2:12 and Lady Simmons by Simmons) and 
out of Nola (dam of three) by Nutwood. She was 
raced originally as a pacer and took a mark of 2:15 
at that way of going and was then shifted to the trot 
and won in 2:19% at Seattle in 1913. 

Five horses named Peter Pan, four of them wig- 
glers, were racing in 1915. This makes things easy 
for the compilers of statistics, especially when the 
owner or trainer fails to give the sire when making 
entries or the clerk of the course leaves out this 
information in his hurry to wind up the afternoon's 
duties and make the run to the beer stand. A sum- 
mer afternoon's thirst has caused more than one well 
bred horse to go into the books minus either sire or 
dam or both. 

Magnus Flaws, who in addition to being a first- 
class presiding judge, starter of runners, authorita- 
tive turf correspondent, teller of Scotch stories and 
christener of babes, is a horse salesman of consider- 
able resource in season, has recently sold to Presi- 
dent E. J. Curtin of the Great Western Circuit the 
diminutive pacer Major Ong 2:03'^, raced for the 
last couple of seasons by Tommy Murphy. Mr. Curtin 
has his eye on those free-for-all paces on the two- 
lap tracks in the west and will have the little fellow 
pointed for them by Joe McLaughlin. They are liable 
to be hard to beat. 

Ed Best of Minneapolis, who purchased Madam 
Mac 2:07% from Charley DeRyder last season, de- 
clares her to be one of the best and most satisfactory 
pacers he has ever owned for use on the ice, free 
legged, good headed, nice to drive in every way and 
fast enough for any company he meets. Several days 
ago he staked his friend Bundy to the Madam while 
he himself piloted Kid Riley, and although the Kid 
proved the winner, with Jerry H. second, the former 
California mare won the fourth heat of the five in 
the fastest time of the event, one minute and four 
seconds. 

<?>•«>■$> 

America's foremost patron of the trotting turf, 
C. K. G. Billings, accompanied by Mrs. Billings and 
a party of friends including Mr. and Mrs. Fred Stev- 
enson and Mr. and Mrs. Fi^d Johnston, has been 
a guest at the St. Francis hotel in this city several 
days of late, the party arriving the latter part of 
last week. Mr. Stevenson, president of the United 
States Frield Trials Club, and Mr. Johnston, Mr. Bil- 
lings' partner in his thoroughbred operations, have 
been the guests of local sportsmen at various little 
events during the week, but Mr. Billings himself 
has been confined to his apartments the greater por- 
tion of the time owing to the after effects of the 
injury he received some weeks ago when his saddle 
horse fell with him. The party proposed going south 
as soon as conditions were improved along the line 
of weather and transportation, and will probably 
again visit San Francisco before departing on their 
journey east. Mr. Billings is much pleased with the 
condition of affairs at Curls Neck Farm and is confi- 
dent that the get of The Harvester will sell for 
higher prices every year for some seasons, as he can 
see nothing ahead but success for that family and 
also anticipates a strong upward trend in the general 
run of prices for well bred trotters that can go to 
the races and bring home their fair share of the 
purse and stake money. 



Saturday, February 3, 1916] 



THE BREl!:UER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



The Buffalo County (Neb.) Asrricultural Association 
held a meeting at Kearney, Neb., Jan. 10, at which 
time all the old directors and board of managers 
were re-elected, as follows: F. F. Roby, president; 
G. E. Haase, secretary; H. A. Webbert, treasurer; 
J. A. Boyd, general superintendent of agriculture, 
and E. D. Gould, superintendent of speed. The mat- 
ter of a summer and fall meeting resulted in dates 
being announced for July 3-5 and Sept. 19-23. The 
speed program has not been agreed on in full yet, 
but it will be similar to or better than last year. — 
Western Horseman. 

L. L. Pope of Cleveland, who as manager of the 
Lawrence-Williams Company supervises the distribu- 
tion of that sterling veterinary remedy, Gombault's 
Caustic Balsam, arrived in San Francisco Monday 
morning, some days behind his original schedule 
owing to the storms that have so thoroughly disrupt- 
ed rail service on the coast since the first of the 
year. His car was derailed between this city and 
Los Angeles, without serious damage or injury to 
passengers, and it was with considerable relief that 
he arrived at the end of his land journey. Mr. Pope 
makes occasional trips of considerable duration on 
pleasure bent, and sailed from this port today, accom- 
panied by Mrs. Pope and a niece, for Hawaii, Japan 
and other lands on the far side of the globe. 

William Sinnock of Santa Ana reports the death 
on January 27. from impaction of the bowels, of the 
black mare Santa 2:25"^ by Ellerslie Wilkes 2:22%, 
dam the double producer Santa Marie Second by 
Hylas 831, the rugged old lady being twenty-seven 
years of age at the time and yet a splendid speci- 
men of the standard bred mare. At the Santa Ana 
fair last season Mr. Sinnock exhibifed her in two 
events, one for standard bred mares only and the 
other for mare and two of her produce, also standard, 
and in good company in both rings she was awarded 
first premium. The members of her family shown 
with her were her last foal, a mare called Athelo, 
and an older black gelding known as California Chief, 
the latter a green trotter of considerable capacity. 
On July fifth at the driving club matinee at his home 
town he was a winner over three pacers, trotting his 
best mile in 2:231,4, while the following week he 
worked the same track in 2:20il, performances the 
more creditable owing to the fact that he had been 
about three weeks off the ranch at the time. 
•«><«><$> 

Horsemen who race on the ever popular Michigan 
Short-Ship Circuit will have a longer season than 
ever before if the tentative plans adopted by the 
Stewards of the line in a recent meeting at Detroit 
are made permanent. The Ohio points formerly hold- 
ing dates with the organization have been dropped 
from the schedule and South Bend, Indiana, has been 
added, the dates as at present arranged being as fol- 
lows: Monroe, June 19-23; Port Huron, June 26-30; 
Saginaw, July 3-7; Bay City. July 10-14; Jackson, 
July 17-21; South Bend, Ind., July 24-28; Port Huron, 
July 31-Aug. 4; Monroe, Aug. 7-11; Mt. Clemens, Aug. 

14- 18; Owosso, Aug. 21-25; Ithaca (fair), Aug. 28- 
Sept. 1; Detroit (Michigan state fair), Sept. 4-8; 
Jackson county fair, Sept. 11-25; Charlotte fair, Sept. 
18-22; Marshall fair, Sept. 25-29; Saginaw fair, Oct. 
1-5; Detroit Driving Club, Oct. 8-12; Kalamazoo, Oct. 

15- 18; Monroe, Oct, 22-26. The executive committee 
composed of President H. C. Knill, Jr., of Port Hu- 
ron, Vice-President Frank W. McQueeney of Detroit 
and Secretary Thomas F. Morris of Saginaw will 
meet shortly and arrange the dates permanently as 
well as make provision for the classes for the stakes 
and purses. Colt races will be a feature of every 
program. 

<S><S><S> 

Great is the power of the beef and dairy cow in 
this broad land of ours! Twenty-odd years ago Palo 
Alto was the greatest speed nursery in the world, 
and now there is scarcely a vestige of its old glory 
remaining and a large acreage of the famous old 
place has been leased by a coterie of local capital- 
ists and will be operated as a dairy farm. In the 
early nineties William O'B. Macdonough paid well 
over a hundred thousand dollars for the great thor- 
oughbred stallion Ormonde and brought the son of 
Bend Or to San Mateo county and established near 
Redwood City the farm which was to become known 
around the world as Ormondale. Here were assem- 
bled many matrons of high degree, and their produce 
to the cover of Onnonde and his sons went forth and 
did battle right royally and successfully with the best 
the land had to offer. Came at last the death of the 
master, the falling of racing into the slough of dis- 
repute, and year by year the number of horses at the 
one-time home of the "sire of the century" was 
reduced, until a few months ago the last of them 
went to find new homes on other western farms. 
Some weeks ago the Ormondale Company began 
stocking the iilace with the best of .Shorthorn beef 
cattle obtainable in the west, and now in Ormonde's 
old stall in the stud bam there stands a sire of 
another type — the bull Golden Goods Junior, pur- 
chased at the stock show at Portland for the sum of 
twelve hundred dollars. In other stalls are found 
ten cows and calves of high degree from the herds 
of A. D. Dunn of Wapato, Washington, and a couple 
of prize winniui; calves purchased here in (California 
at the auction of the holdings of the Gibson Estate 
Company, and from this nucleus it is the purpose of 
the present owners to establish the grandest herd of 
Shorthorns in the whole length and breadth of the 
Golden State. Thus passeth the old order. 



Theodore Sterneman of Milwaukee, who raced 
Hal S. 2:04^4 for two seasons before si-lling him to 
Tommy Murphy without ever finishing behind the 
money, has repurchased the roan son of Hal Chaffin 
and will race him this season over the halfniile 
tracks. Unless Theodore has a key to this bird that 
he failed to include witli the bill of sale to Murphy 
the writer does not envy him his job as pilot. From 
the way he raced for Murphy here last fall he should 
be a valuable acquisition for any man witli land to 
clear, as he could pull stumps by the bit, without any 
assistance of a mechanical nature. Magnus Flaws 
engineered the deal. 

<?><«><S> 

One of the most attractive stallion folders which 
we have seen in a long time has just come to hand 
from Cranwood Park Farm, Cleveland, of which Guy 
H. Heasley is manager. It is a beautifully printed, 
nicely illustrated little booklet of sixteen pages exclu- 
sive of cover and sets forth in a concise and con- 
vincing manner the excellent qualities of that good 
son of McKinney. Prince Ingoniar 2:12'i, whose rec- 
ord was made in the third lieat of a winning race 
over the two-lap course at Rockporf. Were the 
Prince able to talk he would undoubt(>dly express 
considerable gratification over the course taken by 
his owners in putting him before the public, and their 
method is one that can be followed with profit by 
the owners of really good stallions wherever they be 
found. 

<$> <$> 

Charley DeRyder's crew of assistants are handling 
among others about a dozen mighty pleasing year- 
lings, belonging to various owners but mostly the 
property of R. J. MacKenzie. They are a fine husky 
lot, largely the get of Joe Patchen II. 2:03V4 and 
Vernon McKinney 2:01i/^, and in every case they are 
out of mares of very high quality. With one excep- 
tion they are California bred, the odd one being the 
black follow by The Northern Man, dam by General 
Forrest, brought from the Blue Grass by Mr. DeRy- 
der when he shipped home after the meeting at Lex- 
ington last fall, and the Californians compare more 
than merely favorably with this son of Kentucky. 
One of the huskiest scamps of the bunch is the bay 
colt by Zomblack 2:10i/4 out of Martha Spy, the dam 
of the good MacKenzie colt trotter Anvilite (2) 
2:221,4. 

<S><$>^ 

While the Arkansas legislature stepped on the 
pari-mutual bill and squashed it last winter, the resi- 
dents of Hot Springs have not given up their efforts 
to bring back thoroughbred racing to their midst, and 
there is a strong probability that a meeting will be 
staged there for the thirty days beginning March 10, 
backed by the Business Men's League and conducted 
after the fashion prevalent and successful in New 
Orleans. Out of a total of nearly four hundred votes 
cast by members of the league on the proposition 
some days ago the sentiment was unexpectedly 
strong in favor of holding the meeting, only thirteen 
votes being recorded as opposed to the project. 
President Strauss of the league is the man actively 
behind the gun and arrangements have been made 
with Louis A. Cella for the use of Oaklawn track 
if plans for the event are perfected. The manner in 
which the racing at New Orleans is being conducted 
is doing much to rehabilitate the thoroughbred in 
public esteem. 

<$> <S> <«> 

After the Lower California Jockey Club had ov(>r- 
come all sorts of obstacles in their efforts to estab- 
lish thoroughbred racing at the town on the border 
near San Diego, Tia Juana, and had things running 
in tiptop shape and a meeting fli progress which was 
steadily increasing in popularity and success, the 
weather man stepped in and called a halt in a manner 
totally unforeseen. The location of the plant was 
chosen on account of the prevalence of good racing 
weather and the absence of rains of any extent, and 
then comes a flood that washes away a portion of 
the track. With the damage done by the waters at 
the time of their first visitation practically com- 
pleted, rail connections resumed and the meeting on 
the eve of being again put under way, a second flood 
more destnictive than tlie first one nianif(>sts itself, 
with the result that the buildings on the fiat, with the 
exception of the grand stand, and practically all of 
the course itself, were obliterated. Rail connections 
with the towns on the American side from which the 
plant drew its greatest patronage will in all prob- 
ability not be in operation for a period of sixty days, 
while it will 1)(> even longer before the county roads 
will be repaii'cd to the i)oint where aulos may travel 
thf>m in safety. Thus cut off from the world, the dis- 
continuance of the present meeting was Inevitable, 
and no attempt will be made to resume operations 
within the time originally selected for the club's 
inaugural event. It is now planned to commence the 
rebuilding of the course and the necessary structures 
as soon as the flood waters recede and materials can 
be secured, and have everything in readiness for a 
midsummer meeting, to follow those of Denver and 
Reno, the regular winter session being scheduled to 
commence on Thanksgiving day. The stables, most 
fortunately, were erected on high land and were not 
reached by the water, so no damage was inflicted 
upon the horses in attendance. The patronage ac- 
corded the club during the few weeks of its active 
operations has convinced its members thai they are 
on a i)aying proposition under normal conditions, and 
when their plant is reopened it will be more adequate 
and comfortable in every way than was the case 
when the first meeting was commenced. 



DEATH CLAIMS NOTED HORSEMAN. 



Herman B. Duryt-a, who won the Kpsom Derby of 
1914 in England with Durbar II.. died on January 25 
at Saraiuic Lake, N. Y. Mr. Duryea had a violent 
attack of grippe in London in th(> early autumn of 
1911, which left him in a thoroughly weak and run- 
down condition and from which he never fully recov- 
ered. Mr. Duryea was a member of llie Jockey Club 
and frequently acted as deputy sttnvard for that or- 
ganization. He was also a member of the I'nion 
Club, the Meadow Brook Club, the Turf and Field 
Club, the Brook, Racquet. Tennis and other clubs, 
and various racing asocial ions. He was one of the 
foremost all around sportsmen of America, his suc- 
cesses in yachting, shooting and other sports being 
pronoimced. 

Mr. Duryea became identified with the turf shortly 
before the death of the late William C. Whitney, 
when his first horses of reputation were Acefull, 
Whorler and Irish Lad. On the death of Mr. Whitney 
all his horses were leased to Mr. Duryea and raced in 
his nam(> and colors during the year 1901 (Arlful's 
Futurity year). After tliis Mr. Duryea raced his own 
horses on the American turf with marked success. 
He owned and raced such horses as Irish Lad, Ben 
Ban, McKittridge, Dreamer, Mediant and many oth- 
ers. 

After the passage of legislation adverse to the in- 
terests of racing in America, Mr. Duryea shipped his 
stable to France and located a breeding and racing 
establishment there. He was one of the most suc- 
cessful American sportsmen who ever raced in for- 
eign countries. He raced horses largely of his own 
breeding, including Sweeper II., winner of the Two 
Thousand (Guineas and favorite for that year's Derby 
Later on he won the Derby of 1914 with Durbar II., 
another of his own breeding. Besides these the 
famous horses raced in England and France included 
Mediant, winner of the Stewards' Cup at Goodwood; 
Banshee, winner of the French Thousand Guineas; 
Blarney, Frizzle, Hickory, Boyne, Shannon and many 
others. 

o 

MISSOURI SADDLE HORSE BREEDERS MEET. 



The Saddle Horse Breeders' Association met Wed- 
nesday afternoon of Farmers' Week at the Missouri 
College of Agriculture. A number of the speakers 
dwelt upon the judging problems of interest to exhib- 
itors of light horses. E. E. Ilolman divided judges 
into three classes, (1) honest but incompetent, (2) 
competent men who undertake to distribute premiums 
on some basis other than superiority of horses, and 
(3) men who are both honest and thoroughly com- 
petent. 

Porter Taylor, a prominent Missouri judge of light 
horses presented the judge's point of view by empha- 
sizing the seriousness of the judge's work. There 
are few men, he believes, that do not appreciate the 
honor and responsibility of the task of judging live 
stock and the judge is entitled to the same courtesy 
and respect from the exhibitor which the exhibitor 
demands for himself, particularly in the matter of 
care in the comments made upon the work. The 
discussion of these two papers unquestionably 
brought an exchange of different points of view which 
will be very helpful in eliminating the unpleasant 
differences of opinion that sometimes arise at horse 
shows. The Saddle Horse Breeders* Association 
should actively i)romote the riding of horses in both 
city and country, in the opinion of Rufus Jackson, 
who calls attention to the men who want riding 
horses for business or pleasure, and the office man 
who must have some such exercise as riding affords 
in order to retain his health. 

The old officers w(>re re-elected as follows: James 
Houchin, Jefferson City, president; E. A. Trowbridge, 
Columbia, vice-president, and Curtis P. Caulhorne, 
Mexico, secretary. 

o 

YEARLINGS PLENTIFUL AT LEXINGTON. 



Visitors to Kentucky can see at this time more 
tlian one coming prospective stake winner among the 
yearlings being prepared for the sales to be held next 
month. The colts and fillies at the track, by J. Mal- 
colm Forbes 2:08. General Watts 2:06%. Morgan 
Axworthy 2:17, Peter the Great 2:07'.i, and Axworthy 
2:15V^, furnish a degree of excellence rarely seen in 
trotters of this age, while at Walnut Hall Farm the 
most r(>markable collection of young speed marvels 
ever produced at that nursery for futurity winners is 
on exhibition. A shrewd observer, capable of select- 
ing the best, would reap a rich harvest by purchasing 
a few from among the many really high-class year- 
lings now taking their daily lessons over the roads 
at the Lexington track and in the long stable at Wal- 
nut Hall Farm, and by giving the youngsters a chance 
to develop before asking of Ihem the supreme effort. 
These yearlings have received no injury from their 
schooling and are invariably sound, well mad<^ and 
full of quality. Among the one hundred or so year- 
lings are several capable of speeding a 2:30 shot, 
while at least a dozen can brush considerably faster. 
A great opportunity, truly, for a discriminating buyer 
to seh'Ct racing material, colt trotters with extreme 
speed and perfect manners. When the practice of 
forcing yearlings to supreme effort has been aban- 
doned, just sucii colls and fillies as can now be seen 
in Kentucky will furnish the- winners of a majority 
of the futurities and purses offered during a season's 
campaign. — American Horse Breeder. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 5, 1916. 



ROD. GUN AND KENNEL ' 



CONDUCTED BY FISHER HUNT 



n • • • • ' 

STATE GAME FARM TO BE DISCONTINUED. 



Sacramento, February 1. — The State Board of Con- 
trol announced today that it would discontinue im- 
mediately the wild game farm established over two 
seasons ago at Hayward, Alameda county, where a 
large tract of land was leased to be used exclusively 
In the further development of the game resources of 
the State. 

It is announced that the expense is too great. The 
farm has devoted much of its time to the study and 
care of the mountain valley quail. It was sought to 
instruct people how pheasants and all game birds 
could be raised artificially. 



The Fish and Game Commission outlined the work 
done last season and was looking forward to success 
in liberating game this coming season. 

Although no attempt was made to rear large num- 
bers of pheasants at the State Game Farm in 1915, 
yet a number of birds have been planted in different 
parts of the State. Over one hundred ring-necked 
pheasants were liberated near Sacramento and a 
like number in the river bottoms near Edgewood, Sis- 
kiyou county. Very favorable conditions exist in the 
latter locality and ranchers of the vicinity have prom- 
ised to give the birds careful protection. Especially 
good results are therefore expected from this plant. 
The Santa Clara Valley was restocked in several 
places and seventy-five birds were sent to Calistoga, 
Napa county. Fifty pheasants were planted near 
Lake Chabot. In all 581 ring-necked pheasants were 
liberated. 

As an experiment twelve golden pheasants, ten 
silver pheasants and forty-four valley quail were lib- 
erated on Goat Island, in San Francisco Bay. The 
pheasants placed on the island several years ago 
have increased and there is every reason to believe 
that these new birds also will thrive. The very best 
protection is afforded them on the island and at sea- 
sons when food and water are scarce, these are sup- 
plied. About three hundred valley quail reared at 
the State Game Farm were liberated near the farm in 
Hayward. 

o 

THE DUPONT TRAPSHOOTING SCHOOL. 



The mere mention of a trapshooting school will 
cause sportsmen to sit up and take notice, as the 
saying goes, for while there have been and still are 
places where tennis, golf, and other sports are taught 
novices, this country has never boasted anything in 
the form of a shooting school. Anticipating the many 
queries which will follow the announcement of the 
starting of the trapshooting school, E. I. duPont de 
Nemours &Company send out the following infor- 
mation concerning same: 

The school will be operated at Atlantic City, N. J. — 
the greatest year round pleasure resort in the world 
—and a place annually visted by more sportsmen 
than any other city. The convenience of the sports- 
men has been considered in determining the location 
of the school, which will be right in the center of 
activities, on Young's Million Dollar Pier, at the end. 

The purpose of this new shooting school is three- 
fold, viz.: to teach the proper care and use of fire- 
arms, to instruct men and women in the art of trap- 
shooting, and to provide a place where the thousands 
and thousands of "gun bugs" who yearly visit Atlan- 
tic City may enjoy their favorite sport, engage in 
trophy contests, team races, etc., in a place easily 
accessible and at a moderate cost. 

The school will be in operation about March 15th, 
or by April 1st at the outside. The equipment will 
consist of one Ideal Leggett, and one Western Mc- 
Crea, automatic trap, standard targets being used, 
twenty gauge guns of practically every make, and 
competent men in charge. The targets will be thrown 
against a background of water, targets and shot 
falling into the Atlantic ocean. Standard trap loads 
will be on sale, but only twenty gauges may be used. 
The targets will be thrown about 40 yards. A person 
desiring to use his own gun may do so, but only fac- 
tory loaded ammunition can be shot on the range. 

The services of Henry Hewgill Stevens, famous 
professional and known to every one in the trap- 
shooting game as "Hank," have been secured and he 
will be in charge of the school as manager, and will 
act as personal instructor at no cost whatever to 
any one desiring his services. Mr. Stevens has been 
shooting since 1888, and nearly 30 years ago com- 
peted on the trapshooting team of Rutgers College, 
of which he is a graduate, against the Princeton, 
Yale, and other college teams. In the year 1903 Mr. 
Stevens turned professional, going first with the 
DuPont Powder Co. and later representing one of the 
leading Eastern gun and ammunition manufacturers, 
traveling for them in practically every section of the 
country. He is now back with his first employers. 

In inaugurating this new school, the DuPont Com- 
pany believes that it will prove a boon to every 
sportsman who visits Atlantic City, and will also fill 
a long-felt want on the part of those who have desired 



to learn to shoot under the tutelage of a competent 
instructor, such as Mr. Stevens. From time to time 
events will be arranged for groups of shooters who 
may be at the seaside resort, and team races and 
trophy events staged. Local shooters will also have 
events arranged for them, or may arrange their own 
events, and shoot them over the school traps. In 
fact Mr. Stevens will see to it personally that every- 
thing possible is done to make the visit of sports- 
men to Atlantic City as pleasant as possible, and 
sportsmen and sportswomen everywhere are extended 
a cordial invitation to call and see him at Young's 
Million Dollar Pier after March 15th. 

o 

COAST FIELD TRIAL EXPERTS EXPECT BIG 
THINGS OF KENWOOD SAM IN THE EAST. 



On our cover page this week we take pleasure In 
presenting the likeness of the California setter Ken- 
wood sam that will shortly be sent to C. H. Babcock, 
the well-known handler, to be entered in practically 
all of the elite Eastern trials next season. Kenwood 
Sam is a small white, black and tan setter that has 
performed in very promising style in limited com- 
petition. 

Experts who witnessed his impressive victory in 
the derby stakes of the Pacific Coast Club's trials at 
Bakersfield last December are enthusiastic over the 
prospects of Kenwood Sam making a name for him- 
self on the big circuit. He is only a twenty-months 
old puppy by Old Forester out of Caesar Keepsake, 
and his sterling performance in the Derby was his 
his first and only field trial competition. 

Kenwood Sam is owned by Mrs. A. G. Wilkes, of 
San Francisco, who is an ardent devotee of outdoor 
sports. Besides knowing the qualities and fine points 
of dogs, Mrs. Wilkes has earned a reputation as a 
crack shot. During the past open season she fre- 
quently accompanied her popular husband, A. G. 
Wilkes, who is president of the Pacific Coast Field 
Trials Club, on hunting trips and has many limit 
bags to her credit. Mrs. Wilkes also makes a beau- 
tiful figure before the traps and finished up 1915 
with a creditable record of 86 per cent. 

Followers of Pacific Coast field trials will watch 
the performances of Kenwood Sam in the East with 
a deal of interest. Mrs. Wilkes also intends to send 
another of her crack dogs, Melrose Rod, to Mr. Bab- 
cock. It is the first time in recent years that Cali- 
fornia will be represented on the big circuit. 

— 

SCHUET2EN CLUB AWARDS PRIZES. 



The Germania Schuetzen Club, at its annual meet- 
ing, awarded medals and prizes won during 1915. 
Following are the winners in the most important con- 
tests: Five best centers during the year, first prize, 
George A. Pattberg, Huber diamond medal, 801 
points; Ben J. Jonas 1188, William F. Blasse 1564, 
Otto A. Bremer 1679, Martin Blasse 2015, G. C. Gun- 
ther 3916, George C. Post 4218, C. M. Henderson 
4709, John de Wit 4807, Eugene Hoffman 5509, Cap- 
tain John E. Klein 6847. 

Medal winners — First expert class, William F. 
Blasse, 2306 rings; second expert class, George A. 
Pattberg, 2294; first champion class, G. C. Gunther, 
2042; second champion class, John de Wit, 2004; 
first class, George C. Post, 1859; second class, Saul 
Heino, 1856. 

The following officers were elected for the current 
year: President, Herman Huber; vice-president, J. 
William Goetze; secretary, G. C. Gunther; treasurer, 
T. P. Shuster; trustees. Captain Ludwig Siebe, Cap- 
tain J. D. Heise and E. H. Goetze; shooting masters, 
Ben J. Jonas and Martin F. Blasse. 

o 

MOUNTAIN LION KILLED NEAR MANZANITA. 



The first mountain lion in years was seen and 
killed in Marin county last week, according to Dep- 
uty D. H. Hoen. It was a small one, measuring only 
five feet four inches, and was brought down near 
Manzanita. 

» * * • 

H. L. Priscott, a game deputy, made an extended 
trip to Del Norte and found a herd of elk estimated 
all the way from 45 to 90 head, on a narrow strip of 
the Coast country. He reports that the elk are 
prospering. 

* * * * 

Deputy Oyer of Pacific Grove makes a unique 
report. He says that on December 28th near Jack's 
Ranch he saw a doe with two spotted fawns, appar- 
ently two weeks old. This is causing the game ex- 
perts to wonder how the doe caught out of season. 



FISH AND GAME IN NATIONAL FORESTS. 



Rangers are submitting their reports of fish and 
game in the National Forests in California with their 
customary thoroughness. Statistics on the past hunt- 
ing season and suggestions for remedying some pres- 
ent conditions are set forth to the Fish and Game 
Commission. On the whole, fewer deer were killed 
in 1915 than in previous years but the prospects are 
considered bright for a banner trout fishing season. 

In the Sierra forests beavers were seen in a deep 
canyon In Mariposa county in September. Grouse 
and sage hens were also in evidence. Observations 
of the spawning of trout in Chiquito creek, elevation 
4,000 feet, is that they spawn in the small creeks in 
May, June and July. At Whiskey Creek, 5,500 eleva- 
tion, the spawning period is in July and extends into 
August. 

Not many fish were lost by receding water or wash- 
outs of beds. The fish were hindered, however, by 
natural obstructions, from reaching the headwaters. 
Leeches in the gills of fish has been a complaint in 
the San Joaquin river. They killed off fish by the 
hundreds, continues the report. About the falls at 
the junction of Fish Creek and the main river the 
stream is alive with trout for four miles. 

In the Santa Barbara forest 404 deer were killed, 
which is smaller by 32 than in 1914 and 21 less t\an 
in 1913. The reason advanced for this is that there 
was less camping, due to the people taking in the 
expositions. The law prohibiting the killing of 
spiked deer also held down the record. Mountain 
lions are numerous and destructive to deer. Eagles 
are also plentiful and play havoc with wild birds. Fish 
are reported plentiful in the streams. The limit and 
the season are considered about right by the forest 
authorities of this district, as they set forth that 
April 1st was a bit too early and May Is will fit in 
nicely for the opening of trout activities. 

In the Stanislaus forest, 191 deer were killed as 
against 247 in 1914. Quail, doves, wild pigeons and 
cottontail rabbits are reported as scarce. Many moun- 
tain lions were killed last season. No beavers and 
only a small number of grouse are in this district. 
A recommendation is made that many of the streams 
be restocked with fish. No fish are said to be in 
Emigrant Lake, which was once a favorite angling 
spot. 

Plumas forest officials state that no beavers, sage 
hens, pheasants or wild turkeys are in evidence. 
Grouse are plentiful but are prevented from increas- 
ing more rapidly by the work of hawks and var- 
mints. Deer are almost extinct. They complain that 
at Balsam Valley country 75 were killed in their 
winter refuge. 

Rainbow trout in the west branch of the Feather 
River spawn in June, July and August in the streams 
and from Februarly to April in the lakes. Obstruc- 
tions are hindering the fish in some sections. 
o 

TWO THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND THIRTY- 
TWO RABBITS KILLED IN HUNT. 



In the annual rabbit hunt at Corder, Mo., which 
was participated in by more than 186 hunters, and 
which began on Christmas Day and lasted until the 
evening of January 6, the men being divided into two 
teams, one captained by John Smith and the other by 
A. F. Noltensmeyer, 2,432 rabbits were killed, one 
jackrabbit being among the number, and yet it is 
said that rabbits are not as plentiful in Lafayette 
county this year as they were a year ago, when only 
1,640 were killed. The team scoring the greater num- 
ber was given an oyster supper and rabbit fry by the 
losing team. 

* • * * 

At a recent hearing conducted by A. S. Houghton, 
secretary of the New York forest, fish and game 
commission, in the city hall at Saratoga, it was 
decided to ban night fishing in Saratoga Lake for 
pike. The number of lines allowed will be limited in 
an effort to stop the slaughtering of pike by "game 
hogs." The hearing followed the request of the 
Saratoga Lake Association asking protection for 
pike and other fish. The commission will take the 
matter up at once and upon favorable action the new 
ruling will go into effect after thirty days. 

* * * * 

At the present time, according to Deputy Game 
Warden P. W. Nelson of Livingston, Mont., who re- 
cently returned from Gardiner, there are thousands 
of elk, deer, antelope and mountain sheep in the im- 
mediate vicinity of that town. He estimates that 
there are 1,000 elk, an equal number of deer, 100 
head mi mountain sheep and 200 head of antelope 
being fed by government scouts just opposite the 
town of Gardiner and on the road from that town to 
Fort Yellowstone in the national park. All this 
game, which is in the finest shape, has been driven 
down from the high points in the park due to the 
deep snow. The animals are unusually docile, even 
not resenting the intrusion of automobiles. Speak- 
ing of the immense herd congregated in that section, 
Mr. Nelson said: "A prettier sight man never be- 
held. To anyone who has not had the pleasure of 
seeing such vast quanaities of game, it is a real treat 
and well worth ti-aveling miles to see. The animals 
are unusually tame and elegant pictures can easily 
be secured." At the present time, it is said, there 
are several parties there capturing elk for shipment 
to eastern and southern states. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Saturday, February 5, 1916] 



THE BREEDER ANL SPORTSMAN 



NEWS OF KENNEL DOINGS. 



When the Westminster Kennel Club show opens in 
New York on Washington's birthday, over three 
thousand dogs of every known breed will be on exhi- 
bition. Over twenty judges will officiate. The fol- 
lowing are the names of the local fanciers who intend 
to leave here to attend the show : John M. Williams, 
Walter W. Stetteheimer and O. F. Vedder. 

t t t 

Candover Lady, a bull bitch recently imported 
by Mrs. Anita M. Baldwin of Santa Anita, Califomia, 
had a litter of seven puppies by the famous English 
winner, Irish Peace Maker. Three of the puppies 
died at birth. Mrs. Baldwin has named the four 
living ones as follows: Candover Irish of Anoakia, 
Lady Peacemaker of Anoakia, Candover Lass of 
Anoakia and Irish Peacemaker of Anoakia. 

t t t 

Two of the four Airedale terriers that were pur- 
chased in England by Mrs. Baldwin several weeks 
ago arriv?d at the kennel last week. They are 
ch. Stockfield Nina and Ebbo I'rincess. The former 
has a large number of wins to her credit. 

t t t 

An important bit of news which has happened in 
the dog game hereabouts, is that Jack Bradshaw — ■ 
one of the best known dog men in the business — 
whose kennels in San Francisco have been an objec- 
tive point for fanciers, is moving to San Mateo, to 
reside permanently. Mr. Bradshaw has a tract of 
about five acres, and has constructed kennels, and 
otherwise fitted the place as an ideal spot for his 
famous dogs. Mr. Bradshaw has left for the east to 
remain away several months, and, while gone, expects 
to buy about thirty of the best dogs the east has to 
offer. 

t t t 

Mrs. M. Colverd, of San Francisco, is feeling 
mighty fine these days, for her lovely Skepton Lassie, 
an old English sheep dog, has whelped seven big 
husky babies to her English sheep dog. Rags. Skep- 
ton Lassie was best, opp. sex, in the exposition show. 
Five of the children are males, two, females. Mrs. 
Colverd states that this litter is the first to be born 
on the Pacific Coast. 

i t t 

Two thousand seven hundred dogs have just been 
shipped by train from Paris to various parts of the 
front, says the London Chronicle, for the purpose 
of combatting the plague of rats that has recently 
troubled the French trenches. Soldiers have been 
noticed about with useful-looking terriers — small 
Welsh ones, chiefly — and these were supposed to be 
mascots. The mystery is now explained. We hear 
that numbers of ferrets are also being sent to the 
trenches. 

t t t 

Anoakia Kennels has the following matings to its 
credit: J. W. Castanien's Airedale bitch to King 
Oorang; H. C. Redwell of Whittier sent his bitch 
Letty Heart, also, and Bilmer Sunbeam, owned by 
Ray Taylor of San Francisco, Crewe Bonheur, owned 
by Chas. Heerman of Stockton, have all been bred to 
Cypress Cadet. 

t t t 

Mr. Albright is on his way to the sunny clime of 
California, so it is quite likely that he will accept 
one of the big offers made for Wycollar Boy, that 
arrived safely at his kennels the other day and with 
whom the Bauglifell owner is very much impressed, 
considering him the best fox terrier he ever saw, 
and probably the best terrier he ever laid eyes on, 
so that it is a pleasure to have him around. He will 
be, of course, shown at New York, but Mr. Albright 
will not attend the big show. He also hints that the 
greatest Airedale pup of the year, Polam Maxim, may 
shortly find a new home on this side, and several 
good judges have sent word he is a hummer. Well! 
t t t 

Since the first of the year all English dogs must be 
licensed or rather every person who keeps a dog 
must be licensed as many times as he or she has a 
dog. The license there is personal and not on the 
dog, nor is there any "lumping" it, each individual 
dog being taxed $1.85 — no kennel license or breed- 
er's license as with us, allowing any number of dogs 
to be kept. Furthermore if one keeps a dog for a 
friend who has already licensed the dog, one must 
take out a license to keep that dog. Hounds un- 
entered (under 18 months old), sheep and cattle 
dogs, and blind men's dogs, are exempt. The Inland 
Revenue office has no compunctions over making 
the most of the national love of sport and dogs and 
even the man who is doing his bit in the trenches 
must pay for the dog he left behind him, which is a 
bit tough and the fund "Our Dogs" is getting up to 
pay these very hard cases, now amounts to over $200. 
t t t 

Salt Lake's first dog show In seven years will be 
held March 2, 3 and 4 at 17 East First South street. 
The show is being promoted by the Utah State Ken- 
nel Club, recently organized with W. Mont Ferry as 
president. George A. Cranfleld, a bench show judge, 
will handle the details of the show. Cranfield states 
that the proceeds will be devoted to some charity, 
such as the Red Cross society or a similar organiza- 
tion. 

t t t 

Mrs. Kitty Carlin of London, who arrived in this 
country recently, bringing a number of high class 
dogs, states that owing to the war, which has caused 
a falling off of shows in London, breeding is not being 



carried on extensively on the other side, and that the 
dog game in general has been very much curtailed. 

t t t 

Mrs. Noble Lovering of Watsonville, has lost by 
death her English setter. Noble Jack. The dog, 
which was a blue-ribbon winner at the Panama- 
Pacific exposition, developed distemper, which ulti- 
mately caused its dea